Miami And Erie Canal

Author: Bill Oeters and Nancy Gulick
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467112534
Size: 73.44 MB
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In the 1800s, the United States was a nation obsessed with finding a form of transportation that was the fastest, cheapest, and most reliable; at the time, canals were the answer. Canals broke through vast, open countryside, forested woodlands, and rolling hills to expose the heart of the nation to development. They took passengers and goods off of dusty or muddy roads and delivered them to their destinations faster and cheaper than by any other means. From Toledo to Cincinnati, the Miami and Erie Canal provided western Ohio with that sorely needed waterway and became part of the 1,000 miles of Ohio canals contributing to the national network of canals. Today, with the help of government, corporations, and citizens, many parts of the Ohio canal system have been preserved or restored and can be visited and experienced. Watered sections of canal quietly reflect a bygone era and lead an explorer down the towpaths of history.

Tippecanoe To Tipp City

Author: Susan Furlong
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738594458
Size: 54.44 MB
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Tippecanoe started as a tiny stop on the Miami-Erie Canal in 1840, but instead of stagnating as many early towns on the canal did, it flourished. This was thanks to enterprising and hardworking men and women who took advantage of the modern transportation and then stayed for generations. Numerous businesses, factories, and families have come and gone since the canal was abandoned, but by making the most of every new method of travel and technology, Tippecanoe/Tipp City continues to thrive. The name change came in 1938 because of mail delivery mix-ups with another Ohio town of the same name, but that did not change the fact that its founding people have made Tippecanoe a great place to raise children and build a future. In Tipp City today that tradition continues, as it has always been a place where "people were so busy living their lives that they didn't know they were living history."

Wyoming

Author: Rebecca Strand Johnson
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738540030
Size: 19.69 MB
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Years ago, rivers, canals, roads, and railways carved paths through the woodland that would eventually become the Cincinnati suburb of Wyoming. The Miami and Erie Canal first attracted developers to this part of the Mill Creek Valley, creating one of Cincinnati's earliest bedroom communities for big-city industrialists. Wealth allowed them the privilege of living beyond the soot of their own factories and the means to protect this community from industrial sprawl. Smaller homes that now surround the stately Victorian mansions reflect the rise of a solid middle class, which followed the trains and streetcars out of Cincinnati and into the new suburbs. Wyoming's early interest in historic preservation has further established the city's suburban reputation of having tree-lined streets, quiet neighborhoods, and impressive architecture.

Middletown Ohio

Author: Roger L. Miller
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738597034
Size: 78.91 MB
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Over the years, Middletown has grown from a simple village of 50 people to a city of over 50,000. Located along the Great Miami River, Middletown developed from a farming community into an industrial city located on I-75, a major national highway. The Miami-Erie Canal helped speed Middletown's progress and provided a link between northern and southern Ohio. The canal allowed for further industrial growth with such businesses as grist and saw mills, porkpacking plants, and paper and tobacco plants. Today, Middletown is a steel-producing community with many other important industries. The construction of railroads and new roads and highways also played an important role in Middletown's growth. This work recalls many of the people that brought this success and development to Middletown. The everimproving cameras and the rise of the art of photography allowed much of this town's history to be captured on film. Many of these images, taken by both professionals and amateurs, are recorded in Middletown, Ohio. Join Mr. Miller and Mr. Crout in celebrating a community rich in history and heritage.

The Cincinnati Subway

Author: Allen J. Singer
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738523149
Size: 65.53 MB
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Cincinnati emerged from a tumultuous 19th century as a growing metropolis committed to city planning. The most ambitious plan of the early twentieth century, the Cincinnati Subway, was doomed to failure. Construction began in 1920 and ended in 1927 when the money had run out. Today, two miles of empty subway tunnels still lie beneath Cincinnati, waiting to be used. The Cincinnati Subway tells the whole story, from the turbulent times in the 1880s to the ultimate failure of "Cincinnati's White Elephant." Along the way, the reader will learn about what was happening in Cincinnati during the growth of the subway-from the Courthouse Riots in 1884 to life in the Queen City during World War II.

Ohio Oil And Gas

Author: Jeff A. Spencer
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738551715
Size: 18.45 MB
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Forty-five years before the drilling of the famous 1859 Colonel Drake oil well in Pennsylvania, oil was produced and marketed from salt brine wells dug in southeast Ohio. The oil was bottled and sold as a cure-all medicine, Seneca Oil. In 1860, one of the first oil fields in Ohio was discovered approximately 10 miles southeast of these wells. The 1885 discovery of the giant Lima-Indiana oil field set off the oil boom of northwest Ohio, a period of land speculation and rapid oil field development that lasted over 20 years and propelled Ohio into the leading oil-producing state from 1895 to 1903. John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil of Cleveland built storage tanks, pipelines, and a refinery near Lima. The Ohio Oil Company, now Marathon Oil, was active in the area and still maintains an office in Findlay. The Bremen oil field was discovered in south-central Ohio in 1907, setting off another oil boom, which included drilling within the city limits.

Cincinnati S Over The Rhine

Author: Kevin Grace
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439614644
Size: 16.66 MB
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Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine captures a fascinating urban neighborhood in vintage photographs. For over 150 years, the culture, politics, and architecture of Over-the-Rhine have influenced Cincinnati's development. Early German immigrants gave the neighborhood its moniker, after the bordering Miami-Erie canal, and also contributed to its beautiful architecture. Appalachian and African American citizens later contributed to the cultural diversity. Today, a vibrant arts scene co-exists along with revitalizing social programs that aid its underprivileged residents. Over 200 images reveal Over-the-Rhine's urban characters, street life, and architectural landmarks, including Music Hall, Findlay Market, and St. Mary's Church.

Bryan

Author: Walter E. Grunden
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738598585
Size: 12.71 MB
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Founded by John A. Bryan in 1840, the modest village bearing his name soon came to be known as the "Fountain City" for its many artesian wells bubbling with clear, cool water. As roads and rail began to crisscross the Midwest, Bryan, the seat of Williams County, grew in local and regional significance as a bustling locale where politics, agriculture, and industry intersected with profit. Perhaps most famous for internationally known products such as the Ohio Art's Etch-A-Sketch and Spangler Candy's Dum Dums pops, Bryan is also the hometown of several notable natives, including a silent screen star, an astronaut, professional athletes, prominent academics, and nationally known authors. Recently named one of the 100 best small towns in the United States, Bryan still reflects the culture and values of traditional America.

Lost Cincinnati

Author: Jeff Suess
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625851081
Size: 20.98 MB
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Cincinnati earned its nickname of "Queen City of the West" with a wealth of fine theaters and hotels, a burgeoning brewery district and the birth of professional baseball. Though many of these treasures have vanished, they left an indelible mark on the city. Revisit the favorite locales from old Coney Island to Crosley Field. Celebrate lost gems, such as the palatial Albee Theater and the historic Burnet House, where Generals Grant and Sherman plotted the end of the Civil War. Along the way, author Jeff Suess uncovers some uniquely Cincinnati quirks from the inclines and the canal to the infamous incomplete subway. Join Suess as he delves into the mystery and legacy of Cincinnati's lost landmarks.

St Bernard

Author: Marjorie N. Niesen
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738582849
Size: 56.54 MB
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In 1793, John Ludlow settled and built mills along Mill Creek in a hilly, forested area 10 miles north of Fort Washington, Cincinnati, and the Ohio River. The Ludlows survived Indian raids and military incursions, and when the family later sold their land to William Cooper Procter and James Gamble, Ludlow Grove became Ivorydale, where industrial innovation and ingenuity fostered the development of global products that changed the world. The adjacent hilltop was platted and named St. Bernard in 1850 by John Bernard Schroeder. It became home to hardworking German immigrants who created farms, churches, cemeteries, saloons, and shops. The turnpikes, Miami and Erie Canal, and the railroads provided employment, goods, services, recreation, and profits. St. Bernard was established as a village in 1878, boasted waterworks and a light plant in 1895, and incorporated with Ludlow Grove/Ivorydale in 1912 to become a city in 1912. Today Interstate 75 artery brings motorists from north and south through St. Bernard to Cincinnati and beyond. The city remains a great place to live, work, raise, and educate families--some for generations.