Managing Within Networks

Author: Robert Agranoff
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 9781589013650
Size: 65.44 MB
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The real work of many governments is done not in stately domed capitols but by a network of federal and state officials working with local governments and nongovernmental organizations to address issues that cross governmental boundaries. Managing within Networks analyzes the structure, operations, and achievements of these public management networks that are trying to solve intractable problems at the field level. It examines such areas as transportation, economic and rural development, communications systems and data management, water conservation, wastewater management, watershed conservation, and services for persons with developmental disabilities. Robert Agranoff draws a number of innovative conclusions about what these networks do and how they do it from data compiled on fourteen public management networks in Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Nebraska, and Ohio. Agranoff identifies four different types of networks based on their purposes and observes the differences between network management and traditional management structures and leadership. He notes how knowledge is managed and value added within intergovernmental networks. This volume is useful for students, scholars, and practitioners of public management.

How Information Matters

Author: Kathleen Hale
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 158901748X
Size: 19.56 MB
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How Information Matters examines the ways a network of state and local governments and nonprofit organizations can enhance the capacity for successful policy change by public administrators. Hale examines drug courts, programs that typify the highly networked, collaborative environment of public administrators today. These “special dockets” implement justice but also drug treatment, case management, drug testing, and incentive programs for non-violent offenders in lieu of jail time. In a study that spans more than two decades, Hale shows ways organizations within the network act to champion, challenge, and support policy innovations over time. Her description of interactions between courts, administrative agencies, and national organizations highlight the evolution of collaborative governance in the state and local arena, with vignettes that share specific experiences across six states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, and Tennessee) and ways that they acquired knowledge from the network to make decisions. How Information Matters offers valuable insight into successful ways for collaboration and capacity building. It will be of special interest to public administrators or policymakers who wish to identify ways to improve their own programs’ performance.

The Oxford Handbook Of Public Management

Author: Ewan Ferlie
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199226443
Size: 14.87 MB
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The public sector continues to play a strategic role across the world and in the last thirty years there have been major shifts in approaches to its management. This text identifies the trends in public management and the effects these have had, as well as providing a broad overview to each topic.

Collaboration

Author: John M. Kamensky
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 0742573974
Size: 40.39 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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As government faces more complex problems, and citizens expect more, the way government delivers services and results is changing rapidly. The traditional model of government agencies administering hundreds of programs by themselves is giving way to one-stop services and cross-agency results. This translation implies collaboration—within agencies; among agencies; among levels of governments; and among the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. The first part of this book describes what networks and partnerships are. The second part presents case examples of how collaborative approaches have actually worked in the public sector, when they should be used, and what it takes to manage and coordinate them.

Collaborating To Manage

Author: Robert Agranoff
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 1589019172
Size: 18.50 MB
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Collaborating to Manage captures the basic ideas and approaches to public management in an era where government must partner with external organizations as well as other agencies to work together to solve difficult public problems. In this primer, Robert Agranoff examines current and emergent approaches and techniques in intergovernmental grants and regulation management, purchase-of-service contracting, networking, public/nonprofit partnerships and other lateral arrangements in the context of the changing public agency. As he steers the reader through various ways of coping with such organizational richness, Agranoff offers a deeper look at public management in an era of shared public program responsibility within governance. Geared toward professionals working with the new bureaucracy and for students who will pursue careers in the public or non-profit sectors, Collaborating to Manage is a student-friendly book that contains many examples of real-world practices, lessons from successful cases, and summaries of key principles for collaborative public management.

Collaborative Public Management

Author: Robert Agranoff
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 1589012984
Size: 26.67 MB
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Local governments do not stand alone—they find themselves in new relationships not only with state and federal government, but often with a widening spectrum of other public and private organizations as well. The result of this re-forming of local governments calls for new collaborations and managerial responses that occur in addition to governmental and bureaucratic processes-as-usual, bringing locally generated strategies or what the authors call "jurisdiction-based management" into play. Based on an extensive study of 237 cities within five states, Collaborative Public Management provides an in-depth look at how city officials work with other governments and organizations to develop their city economies and what makes these collaborations work. Exploring the more complex nature of collaboration across jurisdictions, governments, and sectors, Agranoff and McGuire illustrate how public managers address complex problems through strategic partnerships, networks, contractual relationships, alliances, committees, coalitions, consortia, and councils as they function together to meet public demands through other government agencies, nonprofit associations, for-profit entities, and many other types of nongovernmental organizations. Beyond the "how" and "why," Collaborative Public Management identifies the importance of different managerial approaches by breaking them down into parts and sequences, and describing the many kinds of collaborative activities and processes that allow local governments to function in new ways to address the most nettlesome public challenges.

Public Administration Evolving

Author: Mary E. Guy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131751453X
Size: 57.59 MB
Format: PDF
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Public Administration Evolving: From Foundations to the Future demonstrates how the theory and practice of public administration has evolved since the early decades of the twentieth century. Each chapter approaches the field from a unique perspective and describes the seminal events that have been influential in shaping its evolution. This book presents major trends in theory and practice in the field, provides an overview of its intellectual development, and demonstrates how it has professionalized. The range from modernism to metamodernism is reflected from the perspective of accomplished scholars in the field, each of whom captures the history, environment, and development of a particular dimension of public administration. Taken together, the chapters leave us with an understanding of where we are today and a grounding for forecasting the future.

Creating Effective Rules In Public Sector Organizations

Author: Leisha DeHart-Davis
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 1626164479
Size: 18.99 MB
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Rules in public sector organizations are both indispensable and disliked. Rules direct an array of critical tasks such as managing employees, controlling public finances, and structuring interactions with citizens. Yet scholars and practitioners alike tend to focus on the consequences of bad rules, such as inefficiency, rigidity, or unintended consequences. This focus on bad rules overlooks the need to craft the right rules. This book provides a comprehensive portrait of rules in public organizations, and it explains the characteristics of beneficial rules that help public organizations function effectively, what the author calls "green-tape." Drawing on a decade of original research and interdisciplinary scholarship, DeHart-Davis builds a framework of three perspectives. The organizational perspective, which sees rules as a tool for achieving managerial goals and organizational functions; the individual perspective, which examines how rule design and implementation impact employees; and the behavioral perspective, which explores human responses to the intersection of the first two perspectives. The author uses this framework to analyze a local-government case study of non-union employee grievance policy. The book concludes with summarizing key findings for practitioners as well as suggesting directions for future research.

Organization Theory And The Public Sector

Author: Tom Christensen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134080255
Size: 47.37 MB
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Public sector organizations are fundamentally different to their private sector counterparts. They are multi-functional, follow a political leadership, and the majority do not operate in an external market. In an era of rapid reform, reorganization and modernization of the public sector, this book offers a timely and illuminating introduction to the public sector organization that recognizes its unique values, interests, knowledge and power-base. Drawing on both instrumental and institutional perspectives within organization theory, as well as democratic theory and empirical studies of decision-making, this text addresses five central aspects of the public sector organization: goals and values leadership and steering reform and change effects and implications understanding and design. This volume challenges conventional economic analysis of the public sector, arguing instead for a democratic-political approach and a new, prescriptive organization theory. A rich resource of both theory and practice, Organization Theory for the Public Sector: Instrument, Culture and Myth is essential reading for anybody studying the public sector.

Ethics And Management In The Public Sector

Author: Alan Lawton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136204849
Size: 27.25 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Grappling with ethical issues is a daily challenge for those working in organizations that deliver public services. Such services are delivered through an often bewildering range of agencies and amidst this constant change, there are fears that a public service ethos, a tradition of working in the public interest, becomes blurred. Using extensive vignettes and case studies, Ethics and Management in the Public Sector illuminates the practical decisions made by public officials. The book takes a universal approach to ethics reflecting the world-wide impact of public service reforms and also includes discussions on how these reforms impact traditional vales and principles of public services. This easy-to-use textbook is a definitive guide for postgraduate students of public sector ethics, as well as students of public management and administration more generally.