Made In Africa

Author: Arkebe Oqubay
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198739893
Size: 69.44 MB
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Made in Africa provides new evidence and arguments that will help readers to understand the realities of, and prospects for, an 'African Renaissance'. It draws on original research by a senior government official with direct policy experience in the field into the performance of three sectors in Ethiopia: cement, leather, and flowers. The design and practice of industrial policy is explored, as are the reasons for different policy outcomes in the threesectors. Also examined are the industrial structures and global value chains in associated industries in order to demonstrate the challenges African firms face in international markets. The book emphasizes thevalue of learning from failures and from successes, and challenges conventional wisdom among economists and international organizations, including those recently claiming to champion a 'new industrial policy'. If African countries are to achieve sustained increases in living standards, they must expand manufacturing. To achieve this, a more interventionist state is needed than is generally accepted by development economists.

Made In Africa

Author: Arkebe Oqubay
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191060437
Size: 71.39 MB
Format: PDF
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Made in Africa presents the findings of original field research into the design, practice, and varied outcomes of industrial policy in the cement, leather and leather products, and floriculture sectors in Ethiopia. It explores how and why the outcomes of industrial policy are shaped by particular factors in these industries. It also examines industrial structures and associated global value chains to demonstrate the challenges faced by African firms in international markets. The findings are discussed against the backdrop of 'industrial policy', which has recently found renewed favour among economists and international organizations, and of the history of thought about and practice in industrialization. The book seeks to learn from the failures and successes in the three sectors, all of them functioning under the umbrella of a single industrial strategy. It argues that an effective industrial policy requires a more interventionist state than most development economists would accept, including those recently claiming to champion a 'new industrial policy'. Moreover, it argues that success lies in the interactions among policy, specific industrial structures, and institutions. Specifically, a successful policy, he posits should maximize linkage effects, but will founder in the absence of a clear understanding of the political economy of each sector.

Made In Africa

Author: Arkebe Oqubay
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191077801
Size: 12.67 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 7553
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Made in Africa presents the findings of original field research into the design, practice, and varied outcomes of industrial policy in the cement, leather and leather products, and floriculture sectors in Ethiopia. It explores how and why the outcomes of industrial policy are shaped by particular factors in these industries. It also examines industrial structures and associated global value chains to demonstrate the challenges faced by African firms in international markets. The findings are discussed against the backdrop of 'industrial policy', which has recently found renewed favour among economists and international organizations, and of the history of thought about and practice in industrialization. The book seeks to learn from the failures and successes in the three sectors, all of them functioning under the umbrella of a single industrial strategy. It argues that an effective industrial policy requires a more interventionist state than most development economists would accept, including those recently claiming to champion a 'new industrial policy'. Moreover, it argues that success lies in the interactions among policy, specific industrial structures, and institutions. Specifically, a successful policy, he posits should maximize linkage effects, but will founder in the absence of a clear understanding of the political economy of each sector.

Industrial Policy And Economic Transformation In Africa

Author: Akbar Noman
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231540779
Size: 48.80 MB
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The revival of economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa is all the more welcome for having followed one of the worst economic disasters since the industrial revolution. Six of the world’s fastest growing economies in the 2000s were African. But with the exception of Ethiopia and Rwanda, the growth of these African nations was largely fueled by discoveries and the rising price of oil. Deindustrialization has yet to be reversed and structural transformation remains limited. This book explores the vital role that industrial policies can play in bringing about a transformation of African economies. Such policies pertain not just to industry. They traverse all economic sectors, including finance, information technology, and agriculture. More accurately understood as a package of learning, industrial, and technology (LIT) policies, they aim to bring vigorous and lasting growth to the region. This collection features case studies of LIT policies in action in many parts of the world, examining their risks and rewards and what they mean for Sub-Saharan Africa.

Made In Africa

Author: Carol Newman
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 0815728166
Size: 67.48 MB
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Why is there so little industry in Africa? Over the past forty years, industry has moved from the developed to the developing world, yet Africa’s share of global manufacturing has fallen from about 3 percent in 1970 to less than 2 percent in 2014. Industry is important to low-income countries. It is good for economic growth, job creation, and poverty reduction. Made in Africa: Learning to Compete in Industry outlines a new strategy to help African industry compete in global markets. This book draws on case studies and econometric and qualitative research from Africa and emerging Asia to understand what drives firm-level competitiveness in low-income countries. The results show that while traditional concerns such as infrastructure, skills, and the regulatory environment are important, they alone will not be sufficient for Africa to industrialize. The book also addresses how industrialization strategies will need to adapt to the region’s growing resource abundance.

Light Manufacturing In Africa

Author: Hinh T. Dinh
Publisher: World Bank Publications
ISBN: 0821389742
Size: 20.14 MB
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This book argues that light manufacturing can offer a viable solution for Sub-Saharan Africa, given potential competitiveness based on low wage costs and an abundance of natural resources that supply raw materials needed for industries.

Manufacturing Transformation

Author: Carol Newman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198776985
Size: 52.87 MB
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While it is possible for economies to grow based on abundant land or natural resources, more often structural change-the shift of resources from low-productivity to high-productivity sectors-is the key driver of economic growth. Structural transformation is vital for Africa. The region's much-lauded growth turnaround since 1995 has been the result of making fewer economic policy mistakes, robust commodity prices, and new discoveries of natural resources. At the same time, Africa's economic structure has changed very little. Primary commodities and natural resources still account for the bulk of the region's exports. Industry is most often the leading driver of structural transformation. Africa's experience with industrialization over the past thirty years has been disappointing. In 2010, sub-Saharan Africa's average share of manufacturing value added in GDP was ten per cent, unchanged from the 1970s. Actually, the share of medium- and high-tech goods in manufacturing production has been falling since the mid-1990s. Per capita manufactured exports are less than ten per cent of the developing country average. Consequently, Africa's industrial transformation has yet to take place. This book presents results of comparative country-based research that sought to answer a seemingly simple but puzzling question: why is there so little industry in Africa? It brings together detailed country case studies of industrial policies and industrialization outcomes in eleven countries, conducted by teams of national researchers in partnership with international experts on industrial development. It provides the reader with the most comprehensive description and analysis available to date of the contemporary industrialization experience in low-income Africa.

Jimmy Carter And The Horn Of Africa

Author: Donna R. Jackson
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786483725
Size: 36.96 MB
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When Jimmy Carter ascended to the U.S. presidency in 1977, he stepped into an office still struggling with the aftermath of the Vietnam War and the Watergate scandal. As president, he had to administer his foreign policy and fight the Cold War within the limits imposed by both. With the option of traditional military recourse essentially closed to Carter, he redirected American foreign policy to challenge the Soviet Union on a moral level, emphasizing regionalism and human rights. A careful examination of his policy shows that his approach was similar in other parts of the world. Particularly representative were his actions in Ethiopia and Somalia. This analysis of President Carter's foreign policy in the Horn of Africa demonstrates Carter's consistent approach to foreign affairs throughout his administration. It follows the president's deliberate designing of his overall policy and his attempt to regain for the presidency the trust and confidence of the American people. It discusses the ways in which this policy dealt with such issues as human rights abuses, Cold War concerns including a strong Communist bloc presence, and the violation of international law. Finally, the book examines the changes that occurred at the end of Carter's administration and the corresponding changes in policy--but not in motivation.

Green Industrial Policy In Emerging Countries

Author: Anna Pegels
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136024085
Size: 79.60 MB
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For decades, governments have tried to foster industrial competitiveness and economic growth. Many instruments are known to work, and many lessons have been learned. However, humanity is increasingly feeling the effects of natural resource depletion. The rate of this depletion is deeply unsustainable, and it is – as of yet – inextricably linked to economic growth and development. To preserve acceptable living conditions for future generations, while at the same time creating these conditions for millions of poor in the first place, we must achieve a de-linking of economic activity and resource depletion. This book identifies the drivers and success factors of green industrial policy, which seeks to reconcile the synergies and trade-offs which exist between economic and environmental goals. Greening the economy is a goal which will require enormous investment. As markets are currently failing to provide the required incentives for environmental sustainability, governments must intervene and provide ‘policy rents’ for investments in sustainability while withdrawing rents from polluting investments. In this they will face the risk of political capture by interest groups and difficult choices among technologies. Rent management is therefore the heart of green industrial policy and the focus of this book. On top of this, the country examples provided in this volume focus on the emerging powers, which will have an important influence the future of our planet. However, the lessons learned are valuable not only for countries introducing green industrial policies for the first time, but also for those under pressure to reform existing policies. This book will be of interest to students, researchers and policymakers in the areas of energy policy, sustainable development, industrial economics and ecological economics.

Making Citizens In Africa

Author: Lahra Smith
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107035317
Size: 29.31 MB
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Making Citizens in Africa argues that citizenship creation and expansion is a pivotal part of political contestation in Africa today. Citizenship is a powerful analytical tool with which to approach political life in contemporary Africa because the institutional and structural reforms of the past two decades have been inextricably linked with the battle over the "right to have rights." Professor Lahra Smith's work advances the notion of meaningful citizenship, which refers to the way in which rights are exercised, or the effective practice of citizenship. Using data from Ethiopia and developing a historically informed and empirically nuanced study of language policy and ethnicity and gender identities, this book analyzes the contestation over citizenship that engages the state, social movements, and individuals in substantive ways. By combining original data on language policy in contemporary Ethiopia with detailed historical study and an analytical focus on ethnicity, citizenship, and gender, this work not only brings a fresh approach to Ethiopian political development but also to contemporary citizenship concerns relevant to other parts of Africa.