Luboml

Author: Berl Kagan
Publisher: KTAV Publishing House, Inc.
ISBN: 9780881255805
Size: 57.18 MB
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The story of the former Polish-Jewish community (shtetl) of Luboml, Wołyń, Poland. Its Jewish population of some 4,000, dating back to the 14th century, was exterminated by the occupying German forces and local collaborators in October, 1942. Luboml was formerly known as Lyuboml, Volhynia, Russia and later Lyuboml, Volyns'ka, Ukraine. It was also know by its Yiddish name: Libivne.

Jewish Heritage Travel

Author: Ruth Ellen Gruber
Publisher: National Geographic Books
ISBN: 9781426200465
Size: 46.71 MB
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Thoroughly expanded and updated, a unique travel guide to various locales throughout Eastern Europe reviews the Jewish experience in Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, and Bulgaria, as well as new sections on Austria, Ukraine, and Lithuania, with information on Jewish communities, historical sites, hotels, and restaurants. Original.

Genocide And Rescue In Wo Y

Author: Tadeusz Piotrowski
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 9780786407736
Size: 60.43 MB
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After the 1939 Soviet and 1941 Nazi invasions, the people of Southeast Poland underwent a third and even more terrible ordeal when they were subjected to mass genocide by the Ukrainian Nationalists. Tens of thousands of Poles were tortured and murdered, not by foreign invaders, but by their fellow citizens, who sometimes turned out to be their neighbors, relatives, and former friends. Other Ukrainians took terrible risks to protect Poles from the slaughter, and often paid for their compassion with their lives. The children who survived them vividly remember these atrocities and now, many decades later, tell their tragic tales. These accounts, never before published in English, describe the brutal murders these children witnessed, their own miraculous survival, and the heroic rescues that saved them. Demographic and other statistical information on the area is provided. Also included are appendices listing the Ukrainian victims and providing additional stories from other provinces, as well as ample Ukrainian, Polish, Soviet, German, and Jewish documentation and a comprehensive chronology. An index and bibliography are also included.

Na Urzeczu

Author: Konstanty A. Luboml
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 54.23 MB
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Here There Are No Sarahs

Author: Sonia Shainwald Orbuch
Publisher: Gatekeeper Press
ISBN: 1619845032
Size: 63.33 MB
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Stripped of her name, 18-year-old "Sonia" Shainwald went to war without basic training, without equipment, without food or any of the essentials necessary to fight the Germans. Urging her family and neighbors to leave a wretched hiding place during the liquidation of their ghetto, she and her parents and uncle spent a brutal winter in the forests and then joined a heroic Soviet partisan brigade. After the liberation, her family spent three years in a Displaced Persons camp near Frankfurt, and eventually reached America. But Sonia's life in her adopted land has been both tragic and triumphant. “Here, There Are No Sarahs” is co-authored by Holocaust scholar Fred Rosenbaum whose “Taking Risks” (with former partisan Joseph Pell) was praised by the San Francisco Chronical as “so extraordinary that it transcends the genre.” As they were completing their manuscript, Orbuch and Rosenbaum discovered that a trove of touching family correspondence written in the 1930s and 40s lay in a closet in Argentina. The letters, some in Sonia's own hand, were copied, sent to the Bay Area, and translated. Several are published in the book's appendix, along with love poetry penned in the forest in 1943.

Shtetl

Author: Jeffrey Shandler
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813562740
Size: 39.20 MB
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In Yiddish, shtetl simply means “town.” How does such an unassuming word come to loom so large in modern Jewish culture, with a proliferation of uses and connotations? By examining the meaning of shtetl, Jeffrey Shandler asks how Jewish life in provincial towns in Eastern Europe has become the subject of extensive creativity, memory, and scholarship from the early modern era in European history to the present. In the post-Holocaust era, the shtetl looms large in public culture as the epitome of a bygone traditional Jewish communal life. People now encounter the Jewish history of these towns through an array of cultural practices, including fiction, documentary photography, film, memoirs, art, heritage tourism, and political activism. At the same time, the shtetl attracts growing scholarly interest, as historians, social scientists, literary critics, and others seek to understand both the complex reality of life in provincial towns and the nature of its wide-ranging remembrance. Shtetl: A Vernacular Intellectual History traces the trajectory of writing about these towns—by Jews and non-Jews, residents and visitors, researchers, novelists, memoirists, journalists and others—to demonstrate how the Yiddish word for “town” emerged as a key word in Jewish culture and studies. Shandler proposes that the intellectual history of the shtetl is best approached as an exemplar of engaging Jewish vernacularity, and that the variable nature of this engagement, far from being a drawback, is central to the subject’s enduring interest.