Losing Eden

Author: Sara Dant
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118934318
Size: 74.46 MB
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Losing Eden traces the environmental history and development of the American West and explains how the land has shaped and been shaped by the people who live there. Discusses key events and topics from the Beringia migration, Columbian Exchange, and federal territorial acquisition to post-war expansion, resource exploitation, and climate change Structures the coverage around three important themes: balancing economic success and ecological protection; avoiding "the tragedy of the commons"; and achieving sustainability Contains an accessible, up-to-date narrative written by an expert scholar and professor that supplements a variety of college-level survey or seminar courses on US, American West, or environmental history Incorporates student-friendly features, including definitions of key terms, suggested reading sections, and over 30 illustrations

Losing Eden

Author: Sara Dant
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118934296
Size: 49.46 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6441
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Losing Eden traces the environmental history and development of the American West and explains how the land has shaped and been shaped by the people who live there. Discusses key events and topics from the Beringia migration, Columbian Exchange, and federal territorial acquisition to post-war expansion, resource exploitation, and climate change Structures the coverage around three important themes: balancing economic success and ecological protection; avoiding "the tragedy of the commons"; and achieving sustainability Contains an accessible, up-to-date narrative written by an expert scholar and professor that supplements a variety of college-level survey or seminar courses on US, American West, or environmental history Incorporates student-friendly features, including definitions of key terms, suggested reading sections, and over 30 illustrations

Losing Eden

Author: Sara Dant
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118934288
Size: 77.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 513
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Losing Eden traces the environmental history and development of the American West and explains how the land has shaped and been shaped by the people who live there. Discusses key events and topics from the Beringia migration, Columbian Exchange, and federal territorial acquisition to post-war expansion, resource exploitation, and climate change Structures the coverage around three important themes: balancing economic success and ecological protection; avoiding "the tragedy of the commons"; and achieving sustainability Contains an accessible, up-to-date narrative written by an expert scholar and professor that supplements a variety of college-level survey or seminar courses on US, American West, or environmental history Incorporates student-friendly features, including definitions of key terms, suggested reading sections, and over 30 illustrations

A Sense Of The American West

Author: James Earl Sherow
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826319135
Size: 39.64 MB
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This anthology collects fourteen essays on the environmental history of the American West, exploring diverse approaches to environmental history, the western environment before Anglo-American settlement, the radical environmental transformations of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the rise of the environmental movement after World War II. The contributions analyze variables of place, process, race, class, gender, and culture. This anthology is ideal for courses on environmental and western history. In addition to the volume editor, contributors include Dan Flores, Robert MacCameron, Gregory McPherson and Renee A. Haip, Dorothy Zeisler-Vralsted, Thomas R. Dunlap, Richard West Sellars, Mark Harvey, Daniel Pope, F. Lee Brown and Helen M. Ingram, Mary Pardo, and John Opie.

How Cities Won The West

Author: Carl Abbott
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826333124
Size: 20.63 MB
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The author traces the evolution of early frontier towns at the beginning of Western expansion to the thriving urban centers they have become today.

Our Hearts Fell To The Ground

Author: Colin G. Calloway
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312133542
Size: 46.15 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"This unique anthology chronicles the Plains Indians' struggle to maintain their traditional way of life in the changing world of the nineteenth century. Its rich variety of 34 primary sources - including narratives, myths, speeches, and transcribed oral histories - gives students the rare opportunity to view the transformation of the West from Native American perspective. Calloway's comprehensive introduction offers crucial information on western expansion, territorial struggles among Indian tribes, the slaughter of the buffalo, and forced assimilation through the reservation system. More than 30 pieces of Plains Indian art are included, along with maps, headnotes, questions for consideration, a bibliography, a chronology, and an index."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Auto Mania

Author: Tom McCarthy
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300110388
Size: 79.47 MB
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The twentieth-century American experience with the automobile has much to tell us about the relationship between consumer capitalism and the environment, Tom McCarthy contends. In Auto Mania he presents the first environmental history of the automobile that shows how consumer desire (and manufacturer decisions) created impacts across the product lifecycle--from raw material extraction to manufacturing to consumer use to disposal. From the provocative public antics of young millionaires who owned the first cars early in the twentieth century to the SUV craze of the 1990s, Auto Mania explores developments that touched the environment. Along the way McCarthy examines how Henry Ford’s fetish for waste reduction tempered the environmental impacts of Model T mass production; how Elvis Presley’s widely shared postwar desire for Cadillacs made matters worse; how the 1970s energy crisis hurt small cars; and why baby boomers ignored worries about global warming. McCarthy shows that problems were recognized early. The difficulty was addressing them, a matter less of doing scientific research and educating the public than implementing solutions through America’s market economy and democratic government. Consumer and producer interests have rarely aligned in helpful ways, and automakers and consumers have made powerful opponents of regulation. The result has been a mixed record of environmental reform with troubling prospects for the future.

Cadillac Desert

Author: Marc Reisner
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781440672828
Size: 61.90 MB
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"The definitive work on the West's water crisis." --Newsweek The story of the American West is the story of a relentless quest for a precious resource: water. It is a tale of rivers diverted and dammed, of political corruption and intrigue, of billion-dollar battles over water rights, of ecological and economic disaster. In his landmark book, Cadillac Desert, Marc Reisner writes of the earliest settlers, lured by the promise of paradise, and of the ruthless tactics employed by Los Angeles politicians and business interests to ensure the city's growth. He documents the bitter rivalry between two government giants, the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, in the competition to transform the West. Based on more than a decade of research, Cadillac Desert is a stunning expose and a dramatic, intriguing history of the creation of an Eden--an Eden that may only be a mirage. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Hell On The Range

Author: Daniel Justin Herman
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780300198263
Size: 43.66 MB
Format: PDF
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Offering an account of Arizona's Rim Country War of the 1880s, the author explores a web of conflict involving Mormons, Texas cowboys, New Mexican sheepherders, Jewish merchants, and mixed-blood ranchers. Their story, he contends, offers a fresh perspective on Western violence, Western identity, and American cultural history.

Savage Dreams

Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520282280
Size: 71.46 MB
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"A beautiful, absorbing, tragic book."—Larry McMurtry In 1851, a war began in what would become Yosemite National Park, a war against the indigenous inhabitants. A century later–in 1951–and a hundred and fifty miles away, another war began when the U.S. government started setting off nuclear bombs at the Nevada Test Site. It was called a nuclear testing program, but functioned as a war against the land and people of the Great Basin. In this foundational book of landscape theory and environmental thinking, Rebecca Solnit explores our national Eden and Armageddon and offers a pathbreaking history of the west, focusing on the relationship between culture and its implementation as politics. In a new preface, she considers the continuities and changes of these invisible wars in the context of our current climate change crisis, and reveals how the long arm of these histories continue to inspire her writing and hope.