Look Me In The Eye

Author: John Elder Robison
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307405729
Size: 68.56 MB
Format: PDF
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “As sweet and funny and sad and true and heartfelt a memoir as one could find.” —from the foreword by Augusten Burroughs Ever since he was young, John Robison longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits—an inclination to blurt out non sequiturs, avoid eye contact, dismantle radios, and dig five-foot holes (and stick his younger brother, Augusten Burroughs, in them)—had earned him the label “social deviant.” It was not until he was forty that he was diagnosed with a form of autism called Asperger’s syndrome. That understanding transformed the way he saw himself—and the world. A born storyteller, Robison has written a moving, darkly funny memoir about a life that has taken him from developing exploding guitars for KISS to building a family of his own. It’s a strange, sly, indelible account—sometimes alien yet always deeply human.

Look Me In The Eye

Author: John Elder Robison
Publisher: Random House Australia
ISBN: 1742745903
Size: 60.57 MB
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'... as heartfelt a memoir as one could find, utterly unspoiled, uninfluenced, and original.' - Augusten Burroughs A New York Times and Australian bestseller, Look Me In The Eye tells of a child's heartbreaking desperation to connect with others, and his struggle to pass as 'normal' -- a struggle that would continue into adulthood. By the time he was a teenager, John Elder Robison's odd habits -- such as a tendency to obsessively dismantle radios and dig five-foot holes (and stick his little brother in them) -- had earned him the label 'social deviant'. No guidance came from his mother, who conversed with light fixtures, or his father, who spent the evenings drinking. Small wonder Robison gravitated to machines, which could, at least, be counted on. It was not until he was forty that an insightful therapist told Robison he had the form of autism called Asperger's syndrome, transforming the way Robison saw himself -- and the world. Look Me In The Eye is Robison's moving and blackly funny story of growing up with Asperger's syndrome at a time when the diagnosis didn't even exist. A born storyteller, Robison takes us inside the head of a boy whom teachers and other adults regarded as defective and who still has a peculiar aversion to using people's given names (he calls his wife Unit Two). He also provides a fascinating angle on the younger brother he left at the mercy of their nutty parents -- the boy who would grow up to write Running with Scissors. Above all, you'll marvel at the way Robison overcame the restrictions of Asperger's to gain the connection he always craved: as a husband and father.

Look Me In The Eye

Author: John Elder Robison
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1407061070
Size: 31.85 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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From the time he was three or four years old, John Elder Robison realised that he was different from other people. He was unable to make eye contact or connect with other children, and by the time he was a teenager his odd habits - an inclination to blurt out non-sequiturs, obsessively dismantle radios or dig five-foot holes (and stick his younger brother in them) - had earned him the label 'social deviant'. It didn't help that his mother conversed with light fixtures and his father spent evenings pickling himself in sherry. Look Me in the Eye is his story of growing up with Asperger's syndrome – a form of autism – at a time when the diagnosis simply didn't exist. Along the way it also tells the story of two brothers born eight years apart yet devoted to each other: the author and his younger brother Chris, who would grow up to become bestselling author Augusten Burroughs. This book is a rare fusion of inspiration, dark comedy and insight into the workings of the human mind. For someone who has struggled all his life to connect with other people, Robison proves to be an extraordinary storyteller.

Look Me In The Eye

Author: Jeremy Isaacs
Publisher: Little Brown GBR
ISBN: 9780316727280
Size: 40.12 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Jeremy Isaacs, whose career in television spanned 45 years, writes the inside story of British television. Beginning in 1958 with Granada, then Rediffusion, followed by the BBC in 1965, he was the first chief executive of Channel 4 in 1979 and now works for Sky.

Raising Cubby

Author: John Elder Robison
Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 0307884864
Size: 33.89 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The slyly funny, sweetly moving memoir of an unconventional dad’s relationship with his equally offbeat son—complete with fast cars, tall tales, homemade explosives, and a whole lot of fun and trouble John Robison was not your typical dad. Diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome at the age of forty, he approached fatherhood as a series of logic puzzles and practical jokes. Instead of a speech about the birds and the bees, he told his son, Cubby, that he'd bought him at the Kid Store—and that the salesman had cheated him by promising Cubby would “do all chores.” While other parents played catch with their kids, John taught Cubby to drive the family's antique Rolls-Royce. Still, Cubby seemed to be turning out pretty well, at least until school authorities decided that he was dumb and stubborn—the very same thing John had been told as a child. Did Cubby have Asperger’s too? The answer was unclear. One thing was clear, though: By the time he turned seventeen, Cubby had become a brilliant and curious chemist—smart enough to make military-grade explosives and bring federal agents calling. With Cubby facing a felony trial—and up to sixty years in prison—both father and son were forced to take stock of their lives, finally accepting that being “on the spectrum” is both a challenge and a unique gift.

Put That Cell Phone Down And Look Me In The Eye

Author: Brian C. Haggerty
Publisher: Bch Enterprise LLC
ISBN: 9780615820149
Size: 14.66 MB
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Whether a college graduate entering the workforce for the first time or a seasoned executive who takes things for granted, civility and respect should be at the forefront of all workplace interactions. With PUT THAT CELL PHONE DOWN AND LOOK ME IN THE EYE: Bringing Civility and Respect Back to the Workplace At ALL Levels of Business, Brian Haggerty shares tips and advice for today's pressured, overworked and harried workforce. Brian Haggerty wants to bring civility back to the workplace-- manners, respect, proper communication, personal pride and presentation-- habits that are not yet properly developed in some younger employees and are often forgotten on the road to the executive suite. Haggerty draws upon his career in business and politics to remind readers of the essential skills necessary for making positive, long lasting impressions on peers, superiors and employees.

Switched On

Author: John Elder Robison
Publisher: Spiegel & Grau
ISBN: 0812996909
Size: 14.65 MB
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An extraordinary memoir about the cutting-edge brain therapy that dramatically changed the life and mind of John Elder Robison, the New York Times bestselling author of Look Me in the Eye NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST Imagine spending the first forty years of your life in darkness, blind to the emotions and social signals of other people. Then imagine that someone suddenly switches the lights on. It has long been assumed that people living with autism are born with the diminished ability to read the emotions of others, even as they feel emotion deeply. But what if we’ve been wrong all this time? What if that “missing” emotional insight was there all along, locked away and inaccessible in the mind? In 2007 John Elder Robison wrote the international bestseller Look Me in the Eye, a memoir about growing up with Asperger’s syndrome. Amid the blaze of publicity that followed, he received a unique invitation: Would John like to take part in a study led by one of the world’s foremost neuroscientists, who would use an experimental new brain therapy known as TMS, or transcranial magnetic stimulation, in an effort to understand and then address the issues at the heart of autism? Switched On is the extraordinary story of what happened next. Having spent forty years as a social outcast, misreading others’ emotions or missing them completely, John is suddenly able to sense a powerful range of feelings in other people. However, this newfound insight brings unforeseen problems and serious questions. As the emotional ground shifts beneath his feet, John struggles with the very real possibility that choosing to diminish his disability might also mean sacrificing his unique gifts and even some of his closest relationships. Switched On is a real-life Flowers for Algernon, a fascinating and intimate window into what it means to be neurologically different, and what happens when the world as you know it is upended overnight. Praise for Switched On “An eye-opening book with a radical message . . . The transformations [Robison] undergoes throughout the book are astonishing—as foreign and overwhelming as if he woke up one morning with the visual range of a bee or the auditory prowess of a bat.”—The New York Times “Astonishing, brave . . . reads like a medical thriller and keeps you wondering what will happen next . . . [Robison] takes readers for a ride through the thorny thickets of neuroscience and leaves us wanting more.”—The Washington Post “Fascinating for its insights into Asperger’s and research, this engrossing record will make readers reexamine their preconceptions about this syndrome and the future of brain manipulation.”—Booklist “Like books by Andrew Solomon and Oliver Sacks, Switched On offers an opportunity to consider mental processes through a combination of powerful narrative and informative medical context.”—BookPage “A mind-blowing book that will force you to ask deep questions about what is important in life. Would normalizing the brains of those who think differently reduce their motivation for great achievement?”—Temple Grandin, author of The Autistic Brain “At the heart of Switched On are fundamental questions of who we are, of where our identity resides, of difference and disability and free will, which are brought into sharp focus by Robison’s lived experience.”—Graeme Simsion, author of The Rosie Effect

Look Me In The Eye

Author: Caryl Wyatt
Publisher: CCB Publishing
ISBN: 1771430982
Size: 31.39 MB
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Caryl’s story is a rare gift as it provides insight into an epidemic that brews behind closed doors in more homes than we would care to imagine. If statistics are accurate (the prevalence of abuse is much higher because domestic violence is notoriously under-reported), then up to 25% of the female population suffers abuse at home every week. In fact, as much as 80% of violence against women is at the hands of the men who supposedly love them. If we care at all for our humanity, society as a whole needs to take up Caryl’s mantra of Abuse Is No Excuse. Few understand the nature or the power of abuse and why someone chooses to stay in an ongoing abusive relationship. However, in reading Caryl’s story, she allows us to put ourselves in her place and we are left to wonder if we would have been able to do it any differently given her history and her reality. This is the gift that Caryl brings with her story and the honest way in which it is told--she makes it possible to move outside of ourselves and our own realities, judgments and prejudices so that we are able to walk the journey of another. This is a rare opportunity to truly live the life of a victim of abuse and to understand--from a safe vantage point--the powerlessness, hopelessness and desperation. Caryl falsely believed she was powerless to leave. Out on the street with no money, without work and nowhere to go, after a failed third marriage, she didn’t make the choice to leave--but she did make the choice to survive. Caryl chose to learn and understand the nature of domestic violence, its root and its cure. All addictions are one-day-at-a-time journeys to recovery--join Caryl on hers. Praise received for Look Me in the Eye “One of the best personal odyssey stories I have ever read.” Dr. Sam Vaknin, author of Malignant Self Love “Look Me in the Eye is a rare opportunity for us to truly ‘live’ the life of a victim of Domestic Violence, and to understand from a safe vantage point--the powerlessness, hopelessness and desperation.” Alison, author of I Have Life About the Authors CARYL WYATT was born in Rhodesia in 1950, where she was brought up in a variety of broken homes. She was abused by her step-father as a child. She moved to South Africa as a wide-eyed 18-year-old and entered the world of modeling. She has 3 broken marriages behind her, but today, as witnessed in her book, has come to terms with her past. She lives in Johannesburg. Visit Caryl’s web site: www.abuseisnoexcuse.co.za ANITA LE ROUX was born in Gauteng, South Africa. She spent twenty years as a television producer before switching careers to writing. As storyteller, both in film and in print, she has been enthused by the true, life stories of women. The insights into Caryl’s story were grounded in her passionate interest in spiritual psychology.

Running With Scissors

Author: Augusten Burroughs
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 9781429902526
Size: 29.16 MB
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Now including an excerpt from Lust & Wonder, a new memoir coming in March 2016. Running with Scissors is the true story of a boy whose mother (a poet with delusions of Anne Sexton) gave him away to be raised by her psychiatrist, a dead-ringer for Santa and a lunatic in the bargain. Suddenly, at age twelve, Augusten Burroughs found himself living in a dilapidated Victorian in perfect squalor. The doctor's bizarre family, a few patients, and a pedophile living in the backyard shed completed the tableau. Here, there were no rules, there was no school. The Christmas tree stayed up until summer, and Valium was eaten like Pez. And when things got dull, there was always the vintage electroshock therapy machine under the stairs.... Running with Scissors is at turns foul and harrowing, compelling and maniacally funny. But above all, it chronicles an ordinary boy's survival under the most extraordinary circumstances.