Little Manila Is In The Heart

Author: Dawn Bohulano Mabalon
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822395746
Size: 77.78 MB
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In the early twentieth century—not long after 1898, when the United States claimed the Philippines as an American colony—Filipinas/os became a vital part of the agricultural economy of California's fertile San Joaquin Delta. In downtown Stockton, they created Little Manila, a vibrant community of hotels, pool halls, dance halls, restaurants, grocery stores, churches, union halls, and barbershops. Little Manila was home to the largest community of Filipinas/os outside of the Philippines until the neighborhood was decimated by urban redevelopment in the 1960s. Narrating a history spanning much of the twentieth century, Dawn Bohulano Mabalon traces the growth of Stockton's Filipina/o American community, the birth and eventual destruction of Little Manila, and recent efforts to remember and preserve it. Mabalon draws on oral histories, newspapers, photographs, personal archives, and her own family's history in Stockton. She reveals how Filipina/o immigrants created a community and ethnic culture shaped by their identities as colonial subjects of the United States, their racialization in Stockton as brown people, and their collective experiences in the fields and in the Little Manila neighborhood. In the process, Mabalon places Filipinas/os at the center of the development of California agriculture and the urban West.

Little Manila Is In The Heart

Author: Dawn Bohulano Mabalon
Publisher: Duke University Press Books
ISBN: 9780822353256
Size: 25.85 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 7094
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In the early twentieth century—not long after 1898, when the United States claimed the Philippines as an American colony—Filipinas/os became a vital part of the agricultural economy of California's fertile San Joaquin Delta. In downtown Stockton, they created Little Manila, a vibrant community of hotels, pool halls, dance halls, restaurants, grocery stores, churches, union halls, and barbershops. Little Manila was home to the largest community of Filipinas/os outside of the Philippines until the neighborhood was decimated by urban redevelopment in the 1960s. Narrating a history spanning much of the twentieth century, Dawn Bohulano Mabalon traces the growth of Stockton's Filipina/o American community, the birth and eventual destruction of Little Manila, and recent efforts to remember and preserve it. Mabalon draws on oral histories, newspapers, photographs, personal archives, and her own family's history in Stockton. She reveals how Filipina/o immigrants created a community and ethnic culture shaped by their identities as colonial subjects of the United States, their racialization in Stockton as brown people, and their collective experiences in the fields and in the Little Manila neighborhood. In the process, Mabalon places Filipinas/os at the center of the development of California agriculture and the urban West.

Filipinos In Stockton

Author: Dawn B. Mabalon, Ph.D.
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738556246
Size: 75.74 MB
Format: PDF
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The first Filipino settlers arrived in Stockton, California, around 1898, and through most of the 20th century, this city was home to the largest community of Filipinos outside the Philippines. Because countless Filipinos worked in, passed through, and settled here, it became the crossroads of Filipino America. Yet immigrants were greeted with signs that read "Positively No Filipinos Allowed" and were segregated to a four-block area centered on Lafayette and El Dorado Streets, which they called "Little Manila." In the 1970s, redevelopment and the Crosstown Freeway decimated the Little Manila neighborhood. Despite these barriers, Filipino Americans have created a vibrant ethnic community and a rich cultural legacy. Filipino immigrants and their descendants have shaped the history, culture, and economy of the San Joaquin Delta area.

Filipino American Lives

Author: Yen Le Espiritu
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781439905579
Size: 63.16 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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First person narratives by Filipino Americans reveal the range of their experiences-before and after immigration.

Empire Of Care

Author: Catherine Ceniza Choy
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822330899
Size: 23.18 MB
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An interdisciplinary examination of how the migration of nurses from the Philippines to the U.S. is inextricably linked to American imperialism and the U.S. colonization of the Philippine Islands in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Transpacific Femininities

Author: Denise Cruz
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822353164
Size: 54.19 MB
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DIVFocusing on the early to mid-twentieth century, Denise Cruz illuminates the role that a growing English-language Philippine print culture played in the emergence of new classes of transpacific women./div

Filipinos In San Francisco

Author: Filipino American National Historical Society
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439625247
Size: 56.31 MB
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Tens of thousands of Filipinos who have lived, worked, and raised families for over five generations in this unique city stake their rightful claim to more than a century of shared history in San Francisco. The photographs herein attest to the early arrivals, who came as merchant mariners, businesspeople, scholars, and musicians, as well as agricultural and domestic workers. But their story has often been ignored, told incompletely by others, and edited too selectively by many. The Filipino American experience both epitomizes and defies the traditional immigrant storyline, and these pictures honestly and respectfully document the fruits of their labors, the products of their perseverance, and, at times, their resistance to social exclusion and economic suppression.

Beyond Preservation

Author: Andrew Hurley
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1439902305
Size: 60.61 MB
Format: PDF
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A framework for stabilizing and strengthening inner-city neighborhoods through the public interpretation of historic landscapes.

Positively No Filipinos Allowed

Author: Antonio T. Tiongson
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781592131235
Size: 65.54 MB
Format: PDF
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Essays challenging conventional narratives of Filipino American history and culture.

Mobilizing New York

Author: Tamar W. Carroll
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 146961989X
Size: 65.78 MB
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Examining three interconnected case studies, Tamar Carroll powerfully demonstrates the ability of grassroots community activism to bridge racial and cultural differences and effect social change. Drawing on a rich array of oral histories, archival records, newspapers, films, and photographs from post–World War II New York City, Carroll shows how poor people transformed the antipoverty organization Mobilization for Youth and shaped the subsequent War on Poverty. Highlighting the little-known National Congress of Neighborhood Women, she reveals the significant participation of working-class white ethnic women and women of color in New York City's feminist activism. Finally, Carroll traces the partnership between the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) and Women's Health Action Mobilization (WHAM!), showing how gay men and feminists collaborated to create a supportive community for those affected by the AIDS epidemic, to improve health care, and to oppose homophobia and misogyny during the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s. Carroll contends that social policies that encourage the political mobilization of marginalized groups and foster coalitions across identity differences are the most effective means of solving social problems and realizing democracy.