Literacy In The Digital University

Author: Robin Goodfellow
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135108595
Size: 11.33 MB
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Literacy in the Digital University is an innovative volume bringing together perspectives from two fields of enquiry and practice: ‘literacies and learning’ and ‘learning technologies’. With their own histories and trajectories, these fields have seldom overlapped either in practice, theory, or research. In tackling this divide head on, the volume breaks new ground. It illustrates how complementary and contrasting approaches to literacy and technology can be brought together in productive ways and considers the implications of this for practitioners working across a wide range of contexts. The book showcases work from well-respected authorities in the two fields in order to provide the foundations for new conversations about learning and practice in the digital university. It will be of particular relevance to university teachers and researchers, educational developers and learning technologists, library staff, university managers and policy makers, and, not least, learners themselves, particularly those studying at post-graduate level.

The Sage Handbook Of E Learning Research 2e

Author: Caroline Haythornthwaite
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1473955009
Size: 51.12 MB
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The new edition of The SAGE Handbook of E-Learning Research retains the original effort of the first edition by focusing on research while capturing the leading edge of e-learning development and practice. Chapters focus on areas of development in e-learning technology, theory, practice, pedagogy and method of analysis. Covering the full extent of e-learning can be a challenge as developments and new features appear daily. The editors of this book meet this challenge by including contributions from leading researchers in areas that have gained a sufficient critical mass to provide reliable results and practices. The 25 chapters are organised into six key areas: 1. THEORY 2. LITERACY & LEARNING 3. METHODS & PERSPECTIVES 4. PEDAGOGY & PRACTICE 5. BEYOND THE CLASSROOM 6. FUTURES

Research 2 0 And The Impact Of Digital Technologies On Scholarly Inquiry

Author: Esposito, Antonella
Publisher: IGI Global
ISBN: 1522508317
Size: 77.32 MB
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The academic landscape has been significantly enhanced by the advent of new technology. These tools allow researchers easier information access to better increase their knowledge base. Research 2.0 and the Impact of Digital Technologies on Scholarly Inquiry is an authoritative reference source for the latest insights on the impact of web services and social technologies for conducting academic research. Highlighting international perspectives, emerging scholarly practices, and real-world contexts, this book is ideally designed for academicians, practitioners, upper-level students, and professionals interested in the growing field of digital scholarship.

The Digital Academic

Author: Deborah Lupton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315473593
Size: 44.50 MB
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Academic work, like many other professional occupations, has increasingly become digitised. This book brings together leading scholars who examine the impacts, possibilities, politics and drawbacks of working in the contemporary university, using digital technologies. Contributors take a critical perspective in identifying the implications of digitisation for the future of higher education, academic publishing protocols and platforms and academic employment conditions, the ways in which academics engage in their everyday work and as public scholars and relationships with students and other academics. The book includes accounts of using digital media and technologies as part of academic practice across teaching, research administration and scholarship endeavours, as well as theoretical perspectives. The contributors span the spectrum of early to established career academics and are based in education, research administration, sociology, digital humanities, media and communication.

Digital Storytelling In Higher Education

Author: Grete Jamissen
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319510584
Size: 12.11 MB
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This book broadens the scope and impact of digital storytelling in higher education. It outlines how to teach, research and build communities in tertiary institutions through the particular form of audio-visual communication known as digital storytelling by developing relationships across professions, workplaces and civil society. The book is framed within the context of ‘The Four Scholarships’ developed by the Carnegie Foundation for the advancement and redefining of teaching, including the scholarships of discovery, integration, application, and teaching and learning. Across four sections, this volume considers the potential of digital storytelling to improve, enhance and expand teaching, learning, research, and interactions with society. Written by an international range of academics, researchers and practitioners, from disciplines spanning medicine, anthropology, education, social work, film and media studies, rhetoric and the humanities, the book demonstrates the variety of ways in which digital storytelling offers solutions to key challenges within higher education for students, academics and citizens. It will be compelling reading for students and researchers working in education and sociology.

Design Of Technology Enhanced Learning

Author: Matt Bower
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 1787149110
Size: 75.62 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book explains how educational research can inform the design of technology-enhanced learning environments. After laying pedagogical, technological and content foundations, it analyses learning in Web 2.0, Social Networking, Mobile Learning and Virtual Worlds to derive nuanced principles for technology-enhanced learning design.

Multiliteracies For A Digital Age

Author: Stuart Selber
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809388685
Size: 43.38 MB
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Just as the majority of books about computer literacy deal more with technological issues than with literacy issues, most computer literacy programs overemphasize technical skills and fail to adequately prepare students for the writing and communications tasks in a technology-driven era. Multiliteracies for a Digital Age serves as a guide for composition teachers to develop effective, full-scale computer literacy programs that are also professionally responsible by emphasizing different kinds of literacies and proposing methods for helping students move among them in strategic ways. Defining computer literacy as a domain of writing and communication, Stuart A. Selber addresses the questions that few other computer literacy texts consider: What should a computer literate student be able to do? What is required of literacy teachers to educate such a student? How can functional computer literacy fit within the values of teaching writing and communication as a profession? Reimagining functional literacy in ways that speak to teachers of writing and communication, he builds a framework for computer literacy instruction that blends functional, critical, and rhetorical concerns in the interest of social action and change. Multiliteracies for a Digital Age reviews the extensive literature on computer literacy and critiques it from a humanistic perspective. This approach, which will remain useful as new versions of computer hardware and software inevitably replace old versions, helps to usher students into an understanding of the biases, belief systems, and politics inherent in technological contexts. Selber redefines rhetoric at the nexus of technology and literacy and argues that students should be prepared as authors of twenty-first-century texts that defy the established purview of English departments. The result is a rich portrait of the ideal multiliterate student in a digital age and a social approach to computer literacy envisioned with the requirements for systemic change in mind.

The War On Learning

Author: Elizabeth Losh
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262323265
Size: 29.43 MB
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Behind the lectern stands the professor, deploying course management systems, online quizzes, wireless clickers, PowerPoint slides, podcasts, and plagiarism-detection software. In the seats are the students, armed with smartphones, laptops, tablets, music players, and social networking. Although these two forces seem poised to do battle with each other, they are really both taking part in a war on learning itself. In this book, Elizabeth Losh examines current efforts to "reform" higher education by applying technological solutions to problems in teaching and learning. She finds that many of these initiatives fail because they treat education as a product rather than a process. Highly touted schemes -- video games for the classroom, for example, or the distribution of iPads -- let students down because they promote consumption rather than intellectual development. Losh analyzes recent trends in postsecondary education and the rhetoric around them, often drawing on first-person accounts. In an effort to identify educational technologies that might actually work, she looks at strategies including MOOCs (massive open online courses), the gamification of subject matter, remix pedagogy, video lectures (from Randy Pausch to "the Baked Professor"), and educational virtual worlds. Finally, Losh outlines six basic principles of digital learning and describes several successful university-based initiatives. Her book will be essential reading for campus decision makers -- and for anyone who cares about education and technology.

A Handbook For Teaching And Learning In Higher Education

Author: Heather Fry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317650220
Size: 46.48 MB
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This entirely new edition of a very successful book focuses on developing professional academic skills for supporting and supervising student learning and effective teaching. It is built on the premise that the roles of those who teach in higher education are complex and multi-faceted. A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education is sensitive to the competing demands of teaching, research, scholarship, and academic management. The new edition reflects and responds to the rapidly changing context of higher education and to current understanding of how to best support student learning. Drawing together a large number of expert authors, it continues to feature extensive use of case studies that show how successful teachers have implemented these ideas. It includes key topics such as student engagement and motivation, internationalisation, employability, inclusive strategies for teaching, effective use of technology and issues relating to postgraduate students and student retention. Part 1 explores a number of aspects of the context of UK higher education that affect the education of students, looking at the drivers of institutional behaviours and how to achieve success as a university teacher. Part 2 examines learning, teaching and supervising in higher education and includes chapters on working with diversity, encouraging independent learning and learning gain. Part 3 considers approaches to teaching and learning in different disciplines, covering a full range including arts and humanities, social sciences, experimental sciences through to medicine and dentistry. Written to support the excellence in teaching and learning design required to bring about student learning of the highest quality, this will be essential reading for all new lecturers, particularly anyone taking an accredited course in teaching and learning in higher education, as well as those experienced lecturers who wish to improve their teaching practice. Those working in adult learning and educational development will also find the book to be a particularly useful resource. In addition it will appeal to staff who support learning and teaching in various other roles.

Historical Thinking And Other Unnatural Acts

Author: Sam Wineburg
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781439903018
Size: 72.62 MB
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Since ancient times, the pundits have lamented young people's lack of historical knowledge and warned that ignorance of the past surely condemns humanity to repeating its mistakes. In the contemporary United States, this dire outlook drives a contentious debate about what key events, nations, and people are essential for history students. Sam Wineburg says that we are asking the wrong questions. This book demolishes the conventional notion that there is one true history and one best way to teach it. Although most of us think of history -- and learn it -- as a conglomeration of facts, dates, and key figures, for professional historians it is a way of knowing, a method for developing and understanding about the relationships of peoples and events in the past. A cognitive psychologist, Wineburg has been engaged in studying what is intrinsic to historical thinking, how it might be taught, and why most students still adhere to the one damned thing after another concept of history. Whether he is comparing how students and historians interpret documentary evidence or analyzing children's drawings, Wineburg's essays offer rough maps of how ordinary people think about the past and use it to understand the present. Arguing that we all absorb lessons about history in many settings -- in kitchen table conversations, at the movies, or on the world-wide web, for instance -- these essays acknowledge the role of collective memory in filtering what we learn in school and shaping our historical thinking.