Lincoln S Bold Lion

Author: James Huffstodt
Publisher: Casemate
ISBN: 1612003400
Size: 33.94 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 4873
Download
This is the first biography devoted to the life of a remarkable young man who, in the words of Civil War historian Ezra Warner, “embarked upon a combat career which has few parallels in the annals of the army for gallantry, wounds sustained, and the obscurity into which he had lapsed a generation before his death.” But the story of General Martin Hardin provides more than a combat record—in fact comprises a walking tour through 1800s America, with its most costly war only a centerpiece. From his childhood in Illinois, where a slave girl implanted in him a fear of ghosts, to his attendance at West Point, along with other future luminaries, to his service on the frontier (where he took particular note of the bearing of the Cheyenne), Hardin’s life reveals the progress of a century. Abraham Lincoln was a close friend and political ally of Martin’s father, who died a hero in the Mexican War. The family were also relatives of Mary Todd. Made Brigadier General at age 27, Hardin fought with distinction at Malvern Hill, Second Manassas, Gettysburg, Grant’s Overland Campaign, and the July 1864 Rebel raid on Washington. He was wounded four times, nearly died on two occasions, and lost an arm during the war. On one occasion he was ambushed on a road by Mosby’s men, one of whom may have been Lincoln conspirator Lewis Paine. Hardin himself took part in the hunt for John Wilkes Booth after Lincoln’s assassination. In these pages we also learn the prominent role of General Hardin’s mother, who acted as her son’s lobbyist in the heady social world of wartime Washington. Over four years, she skillfully played upon her friendship with the President and the First Lady to advance her son‘s career. Although, as we see in these pages, his gallantry and leadership in combat sufficed enough to earn him renown, and in this book the under-sung exploits of a true 19th-century hero are finally revealed.

Lincoln S Forgotten Ally

Author: Leonard, Elizabeth
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807835005
Size: 56.98 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6267
Download
This manuscript is the first biography of Joseph Holt, the U.S. Army's Judge Advocate General during the Civil War. Leonard argues that Holt has been portrayed as more or less a caricature of himself, flatly represented as the brutal prosecutor of Lincoln's assassins and the judge who allowed Mary Surratt to be hanged despite knowing her sentence had been reduced. Leonard contends that the southern view of Holt became the predominant way we see him, in large part because the memory perpetrated by the Lost Cause defined Holt as ruthless toward Southerners and the South. But Leonard argues that there is much more to Holt than what sympathizers with the Lost Cause came to think of him, and she tells his story here, from his early life in Kentucky to his wartime life as a member of Lincoln's administration to his postwar life as the prosecutor of Lincoln's assassins. Perhaps most important, Leonard will look at the erasure of Holt from American memory and investigate how such a significant figure has come to be so widely misunderstood.

Worst Seat In The House

Author: Caleb Jenner Stephens
Publisher: Willow Manor Publishing
ISBN: 9781939688514
Size: 69.96 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6023
Download
On April 14, 1865 John Wilkes Booth changed the world with a single bullet. The assassination of Abraham Lincoln had many repercussions and for Henry Rathbone they were profound. Henry was the only man to confront Booth and attempt to apprehend the assassin. Henry was also the man that let Booth escape. While Henry wasn't officially blamed for allowing John Wilkes Booth to kill Abraham Lincoln, he blamed himself. After the assassination the vivid memories of Lincoln's death and failure to capture Booth caused Henry's mind to unravel. He traveled the world with his young family looking for an escape from his past. In 1883, eighteen years after the assassination, Henry's tortured mind reached its limit. In the early hours of Christmas Eve Henry murdered his wife, shooting and stabbing her multiple times in a fashion reminiscent of Lincoln's assassination. In "Worst Seat in the House" follow the life of Henry Rathbone from his childhood through the Civil War, the assassination and his final years in a German insane asylum.In this biography and case study of a man dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder, see how the events of Henry's life created the man he finally became. Place yourself into the mind of Henry Rathbone and ask yourself how you would cope with failing the world?

Nationalism And Ethnosymbolism History Culture And Ethnicity In The Formation Of Nations

Author: Athena Leoussi
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748629351
Size: 69.25 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3071
Download
Ethnosymbolism offers a distinct and innovative approach to the study of nations and nationalism. It focuses on the role of ethnic myths, historical memories, symbols and traditions in the creation and maintenance of the collective identity of modern nations. This book explores the different aspects of the ethnosymbolic approach to the study of ethnicity, nationality and nationalism.Nationalism and Ethnosymbolism first introduces the main theoretical considerations that have arisen in nationalism studies in the past two decades. It then presents a collection of case studies covering music and poetry, ethnosymbolism in antiquity, and a wide variety of nations and regions. Areas discussed include Eastern Europe and Russia, the Middle East, the Far East and India, Africa, and the Americas.Overall the book offers a defence of the methodology of ethnosymbolism and a demonstration of its explanatory power.

Life Of Abraham Lincoln

Author: Joseph Hartwell Barrett
Publisher: Stackpole Books
ISBN: 9780811701594
Size: 48.54 MB
Format: PDF
View: 7237
Download
Magnificent, original 1865 classic Lincoln biography Early childhood and political career in Illinois Exceptional analysis of the Civil War presidency and the man who rose to the occasion with a patriotic summary of his life and tragic death Beautifully written in 1865 by a political contemporary, this is one of the greatest and most sensitive works of nineteenth-century American biographic literature. It contains Lincoln's most masterful speeches and writings, along with a contemporary, detailed exposition of Lincoln's views--and his political and military decisions--that held the Union together during the American Civil War. For years (and still today) it was and is an original source of information on Lincoln's life and work, masterfully woven together by Joseph Barrett.

On To Petersburg

Author: Gordon C. Rhea
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807167495
Size: 28.44 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2485
Download
With On to Petersburg, Gordon C. Rhea completes his much-lauded history of the Overland Campaign, a series of Civil War battles fought between Generals Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee in southeastern Virginia in the spring of 1864. Having previously covered the campaign in his magisterial volumes on The Battle of the Wilderness, The Battles for Spotsylvania Court House and the Road to Yellow Tavern, To the North Anna River, and Cold Harbor, Rhea ends this series with a comprehensive account of the last twelve days of the campaign, which concluded with the beginning of the siege of Petersburg. On to Petersburg follows the Union army’s movement to the James River, the military response from the Confederates, and the initial assault on Petersburg, which Rhea suggests marked the true end of the Overland Campaign. Beginning his account in the immediate aftermath of Grant’s three-day attack on Confederate troops at Cold Harbor, Rhea argues that the Union general’s primary goal was not—as often supposed—to take Richmond, but rather to destroy Lee’s army by closing off its retreat routes and disrupting its supply chains. While Grant struggled at times to communicate strategic objectives to his subordinates and to adapt his army to a faster-paced, more flexible style of warfare, Rhea suggests that the general successfully shifted the military landscape in the Union’s favor. On the rebel side, Lee and his staff predicted rightly that Grant would attempt to cross the James River and lay siege to the Army of Northern Virginia while simultaneously targeting Confederate supply lines. Rhea examines how Lee, facing a better-provisioned army whose troops outnumbered Lee’s two to one, consistently fought the Union army to an impasse, employing risky, innovative field tactics to counter Grant’s forces. Like the four volumes that preceded it, On to Petersburg represents decades of research and scholarship and will stand as the most authoritative history of the final battles in the campaign.

Braxton Bragg

Author: Earl J. Hess
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781469628752
Size: 68.24 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 6769
Download
"This book was published with the assistance of the Fred W. Morrison Fund of the University of North Carolina Press."--Title page verso.

Grant Invades Tennessee

Author: Timothy B. Smith
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780700623136
Size: 68.77 MB
Format: PDF
View: 1965
Download
Though the battles of Forts Henry and Donelson are often neglected in Civil War historiography, their importance cannot be overstated. It was there that Ulysses S. Grant became a national hero, that a Southern field army ceased to exist, and most importantly, where the Confederacy's vital western defense line was broken and shattered. The South was hard pressed to ever recover.