Life And Letters From The Roman Frontier

Author: Alan Bowman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136773924
Size: 19.56 MB
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Greetings, I ask that you send the things which I need for the use of my boys . . . which you well know I cannot properly get hold of here . . . --A Roman solider on the frontier of England around AD 100 Over three hundred letters and documents were recently discovered at the fort of Vindolanda, in Northern England, written on wooden tablets which have survived nearly 2,000 years. Painstakingly deciphered by Alan Bowman, the materials contribute a wealth of evidence for daily life in the Roman Empire. Military documents testify to the lifestyle of officers and soldiers stationed at Vindolanda, and portraits of domestic life are included in letters between the officers' wives and a letter from home promising a solider a package of socks. The engaging texts from thirty-four tablets provide insight into the similarities of daily existence in the Roman Empire and the present.

Vindolanda

Author: Robin Birley
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445612062
Size: 26.65 MB
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The beautiful site the Romans called Vindolanda lies in south-west Northumberland, in the district of Tynedale, more or less half way between the North Sea east of Newcastle and the Irish Sea to the west of Carlisle. It is just within the boundary of the Northumberland National Park, and is a part of the World Heritage Site of Hadrian's Wall.

Garrison Life At Vindolanda

Author: Anthony Richard Birley
Publisher: Tempus Pub Limited
ISBN: 9780752419503
Size: 11.65 MB
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The ink writing-tablets, first indentified at Roman Vindolanda, just south of Hadrian's Wall, in 1973, revealed a hitherto unknown papyrus-substitute, thin leaves of wood for day-to-day book-keeping and letters. Dating mostly from the years AD 90-125 (Hadrian's Wall was begun in 122), these unique tablets represent the largest collection of original Roman letters ever found. The book paints a detailed picture of two Roman auxilary regiments, the 9th Cohort of Batavians and the 1st Cohort of Tungrians. Among the 400 named officers and personnel, the Batavian prefect Flavius Cerialis features prominently, together with his wife Sulpicia Lepidina, who received the now famous birthday party invitation from her friend Claudia Severa, wife of Cerialis' colleague and fellow hunting enthusiast Aelius Brocchus. In addition to covering officers and familes, friends and colleagues, this book brings to life the ordinary soldiers and their names and duties; military routine, duty-reports, leave and deserters; the supply of food, drink and other goods; merchants and contractors; visitors and entertainment as well as day-to-day enthusiasms as varied as hunting and religion. This book, by the Chairman of the Vindolanda Trust, not only distils all the recovered material, including many unpublished writing-tablets, but makes full use of the other archaeological evidence. The result is an unparalleled insight into the spirit of the day-today life on the north-west edge of the Empire in the three decades before Hadrian's Wall was built.

Echoes Of Jesus

Author: Jonathan Clerke
Publisher: Australian eBook Publisher
ISBN: 1925177025
Size: 31.56 MB
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Many find it impossible to believe Jesus’ words were recorded accurately because he did not write the New Testament himself and there were not mechanical or electronic methods of recording his teachings. Furthermore, surely the hand-copying over the centuries must have distorted the original manuscripts. This book presents evidence showing that the New Testament is an accurate portrayal of the life and teachings of Jesus. Echoes of Jesus is unique because it: • Illustrates how literate and historically aware the ancient civilisations were before and during the life of Jesus • Explains how it was possible for the first disciples to accurately record Jesus' life and teachings; • Provides a highly readable explanation of ancient New Testament documents and what they have to say about accuracy in copying over hundreds of years; • Discusses the content and credibility of non-Christian ancient literature that comment on Jesus and the first Christians.

Tabulae Vindolandenses

Author: Alan K. Bowman
Publisher: British Museum Publications Limited
ISBN:
Size: 31.83 MB
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The Vindolanda tablets wooden writing-tablets discovered near Hadrian's Wall contribute in a remarkable way to knowledge of Roman Britain between AD 90 and c.120. The tablets include military documents, accounts, and correspondence. This third volume presents texts found during the excavations of 1991-1994 (with a few strays from the 1980s). It too

Rome And Its Frontiers

Author: C R Whittaker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134384122
Size: 43.55 MB
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Do the Romans have anything to teach us about the way that they saw the world, and the way they ran their empire? How did they deal with questions of frontiers and migration, so often in the news today? This collection of ten important essays by C. R. Whittaker, engages with debates and controversies about the Roman frontiers and the concept of empire. Truly global in its focus, the book examines the social, political and cultural implications of the Roman frontiers in Africa, India, Britain, Europe, Asia and the Far East, and provides a comprehensive account of their significance.

Spqr A History Of Ancient Rome

Author: Mary Beard
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 1631491253
Size: 72.60 MB
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A sweeping, revisionist history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists. Ancient Rome was an imposing city even by modern standards, a sprawling imperial metropolis of more than a million inhabitants, a "mixture of luxury and filth, liberty and exploitation, civic pride and murderous civil war" that served as the seat of power for an empire that spanned from Spain to Syria. Yet how did all this emerge from what was once an insignificant village in central Italy? In S.P.Q.R., world-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even two thousand years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty. From the foundational myth of Romulus and Remus to 212 ce—nearly a thousand years later—when the emperor Caracalla gave Roman citizenship to every free inhabitant of the empire, S.P.Q.R. (the abbreviation of "The Senate and People of Rome") examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries by exploring how the Romans thought of themselves: how they challenged the idea of imperial rule, how they responded to terrorism and revolution, and how they invented a new idea of citizenship and nation. Opening the book in 63 bce with the famous clash between the populist aristocrat Catiline and Cicero, the renowned politician and orator, Beard animates this “terrorist conspiracy,” which was aimed at the very heart of the Republic, demonstrating how this singular event would presage the struggle between democracy and autocracy that would come to define much of Rome’s subsequent history. Illustrating how a classical democracy yielded to a self-confident and self-critical empire, S.P.Q.R. reintroduces us, though in a wholly different way, to famous and familiar characters—Hannibal, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Augustus, and Nero, among others—while expanding the historical aperture to include those overlooked in traditional histories: the women, the slaves and ex-slaves, conspirators, and those on the losing side of Rome’s glorious conquests. Like the best detectives, Beard sifts fact from fiction, myth and propaganda from historical record, refusing either simple admiration or blanket condemnation. Far from being frozen in marble, Roman history, she shows, is constantly being revised and rewritten as our knowledge expands. Indeed, our perceptions of ancient Rome have changed dramatically over the last fifty years, and S.P.Q.R., with its nuanced attention to class inequality, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, promises to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.

A Preface To Romans

Author: Christopher Bryan
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195351491
Size: 14.68 MB
Format: PDF
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Bryan approaches St. Paul's letter to the Romans with a number of aims in view. First, he wants to show which literary type or genre would have been seen by Paul's contemporaries as being exemplified in the letter. He also attempts to determine what we can surmise of Paul's attitude and approach to the Jewish bible. The study involves discussion of and comparison with other literature from Paul's time, place and milieu --- including other writings attributed to Paul.

The Later Roman Empire

Author: Ammianus Marcellinus
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141921501
Size: 30.88 MB
Format: PDF
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Ammianus Marcellinus was the last great Roman historian, and his writings rank alongside those of Livy and Tacitus. The Later Roman Empire chronicles a period of twenty-five years during Marcellinus' own lifetime, covering the reigns of Constantius, Julian, Jovian, Valentinian I, and Valens, and providing eyewitness accounts of significant military events including the Battle of Strasbourg and the Goth's Revolt. Portraying a time of rapid and dramatic change, Marcellinus describes an Empire exhausted by excessive taxation, corruption, the financial ruin of the middle classes and the progressive decline in the morale of the army. In this magisterial depiction of the closing decades of the Roman Empire, we can see the seeds of events that were to lead to the fall of the city, just twenty years after Marcellinus' death.