Law As Profession And Practice In Medieval Europe

Author: Melodie Harris Eichbauer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317107683
Size: 42.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 4665
Download
This volume brings together papers by a group of scholars, distinguished in their own right, in honour of James Brundage. The essays are organised into four sections, each corresponding to an important focus of Brundage's scholarly work. The first section explores the connection between the development of medieval legal and constitutional thought. Thomas Izbicki, Kenneth Pennington, and Charles Reid, Jr. explore various aspects of the jurisprudence of the Ius commune, while James Powell, Michael Gervers and Nicole Hamonic, Olivia Robinson, and Elizabeth Makowski examine how that jurisprudence was applied to various medieval institutions. Brian Tierney and James Muldoon conclude this section by demonstrating two important points: modern ideas of consent in the political sphere and fundamental principles of international law attributed to sixteenth century jurists like Hugo Grotius have deep roots in medieval jurisprudential thought. Patrick Zutshi, R. H. Helmholz, Peter Landau, Marjorie Chibnall, and Edward Peters have written essays that augment Brundage's work on the growth of the legal profession and how traces of a legal education began to emerge in many diverse arenas. The influence of legal thinking on marriage and sexuality was another aspect of Brundage's broad interests. In the third section Richard Kay, Charles Donahue, Jr., and Glenn Olsen explore the intersection of law and marriage and the interplay of legal thought on a central institution of Christian society. The contributions of Jonathan Riley-Smith and Robert Somerville in the fourth section round-out the volume and are devoted to Brundage's path-breaking work on medieval law and the crusading movement. The volume also includes a comprehensive bibliography of Brundage's work.

A Day In A Working Life 300 Trades And Professions Through History 3 Volumes

Author: Gary Westfahl
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610694031
Size: 40.67 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2319
Download
Ideal for high school and college students studying history through the everyday lives of men and women, this book offers intriguing information about the jobs that people have held, from ancient times to the 21st century. • Provides detailed, interesting essays describing more than 300 professions and occupations across a broad range of eras, including the 21st century, and from around the world, which will give readers a wider understanding of how people have supported themselves throughout time • Supplies historical primary documents that provide personal perspectives on past occupations • Offers fascinating information on how professions began, who did them, and continuity in occupations across time, such as that 18th-century journalists were often imprisoned for displeasing those in authority, and yet 21st-century U.S. journalists may still spend time in jail for refusing to reveal their sources

Studying Late Medieval History

Author: Cindy Wood
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317211200
Size: 62.70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 1284
Download
Studying Late Medieval History is an accessible introduction for undergraduate history students wishing to understand the major topics of late medieval history. Examining the period from 1300–1550, this introductory guide offers an overview of 250 years of transformation, which saw technology, borders and ruling dynasties across the continent change. The book focuses on ten key themes to explain what happened, who the important personalities were and the significance of these events in shaping medieval Europe. Each chapter is a thematic essay which looks at the central topics covered at undergraduate level including the Church, the monarchy, nobility, parliaments, justice, women, children, warfare, and chivalry. The chapters are supported by a detailed evaluation of the key events students need to know and a guide to further reading for each topic. Studying Late Medieval History will be essential reading for all those beginning their studies of the late medieval period.

The Use Of Canon Law In Ecclesiastical Administration 1000 1234

Author: Danica Summerlin
Publisher: Medieval Law and Its Practice
ISBN: 9789004364332
Size: 80.99 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 4308
Download
The Use of Canon Law in Ecclesiastical Administration, 1000-1234 integrates the textual analysis necessary to understand the evolution and transmission of the legal tradition into the broader study of twelfth century ecclesiastical government and practice.

The Medieval Origins Of The Legal Profession

Author: James A. Brundage
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1459605802
Size: 45.37 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3949
Download
In the aftermath of sixth-century barbarian invasions, the legal profession that had grown and flourished during the Roman Empire vanished. Nonetheless, professional lawyers suddenly reappeared in Western Europe seven hundred years later during the 1230s when church councils and public authorities began to impose a body of ethical obligations on those who practiced law. James Brundage's The Medieval Origins of the Legal Profession traces the history of legal practice from its genesis in ancient Rome to its rebirth in the early Middle Ages and eventual resurgence in the courts of the medieval church. By the end of the eleventh century, Brundage argues, renewed interest in Roman law combined with the rise of canon law of the Western church to trigger a series of consolidations in the profession. New legal procedures emerged, and formal training for proctors and advocates became necessary in order to practice law in the reorganized church courts. Brundage demonstrates that many features that characterize legal advocacy today were already in place by 1250, as lawyers trained in Roman and canon law became professionals in every sense of the term. A sweeping examination of the centuries-long power struggle between local courts and the Christian church, secular rule and religious edict, The Medieval Origins of the Legal Profession will be a resource for the professional and the student alike.

Canon Law Religion And Politics

Author: Uta-Renate Blumenthal
Publisher: CUA Press
ISBN: 0813219752
Size: 45.24 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 7720
Download
Canon Law, Religion, and Politics extends and honors the work of the distinguished historian Robert Somerville, a preeminent expert on medieval church councils, law, and papal history.

University Education Of The Parochial Clergy In Medieval England

Author: F. Donald Logan
Publisher: Pontifical Inst of Medieval studies
ISBN: 9780888441881
Size: 48.32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5279
Download
This study sets out to examine how the 1298 decretal Cum ex eo of Pope Boniface VIII, that allowed non-priest rectors of parish churches to absent themselves for up to seven years to attend university, was implemented over fifty years in the diocese of Lincoln.0The need for an educated parochial clergy had been seen from early times and during the Middle Ages was articulated by popes, councils and generations of canonists. In 1298 the decretal Cum ex eo of Pope Boniface VIII allowed non-priest rectors of parish churches to absent themselves for up to seven years to attend university. This study sets out to examine how this decretal was implemented over the next fifty years in the diocese of Lincoln, the largest in England, but the bishops’ registers revealed a much wider practice. In addition to dispensations granted in virtue of Cum ex eo, a very substantial number of licences to study (licencie studendi) were also granted to rectors who were already priests. Over twelve hundred rectors of Lincoln diocese received permissions to study by way of dispensation or licence during the first half of the fourteenth century. This educational phenomenon and the questions it raises are examined in detail. The volume concludes with a register of all rectors of Lincoln diocese who attended university during the period under study.

Law And The Illicit In Medieval Europe

Author: Ruth Mazo Karras
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812208854
Size: 71.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 4156
Download
In the popular imagination, the Middle Ages are often associated with lawlessness. However, historians have long recognized that medieval culture was characterized by an enormous respect for law and legal procedure. This book makes the case that one cannot understand the era's cultural trends without considering the profound development of law.

History Of The Common Law

Author: John H. Langbein
Publisher: Aspen Publishers
ISBN:
Size: 36.98 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6504
Download
This introductory text explores the historical origins of the main legal institutions that came to characterize the Anglo-American legal tradition, and to distinguish it from European legal systems. The book contains both text and extracts from historical sources and literature. The book is published in color, and contains over 250 illustrations, many in color, including medieval illuminated manuscripts, paintings, books and manuscripts, caricatures, and photographs. Two great themes dominate the book: (1) the origins, development, and pervasive influence of the jury system and judge/jury relations across eight centuries of Anglo-American civil and criminal justice; and (2) the law/equity division, from the emergence of the Court of Chancery in the fourteenth century down through equity's conquest of common law in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. The chapters on criminal justice explore the history of pretrial investigation, policing, trial, and sentencing, as well as the movement in modern times to nonjury resolution through plea bargaining. Considerable attention is devoted to distinctively American developments, such as the elective bench, and the influence of race relations on the law of criminal procedure. Other major subjects of this book include the development of the legal profession, from the serjeants, barristers, and attorneys of medieval times down to the transnational megafirms of twenty-first century practice; the literature of the law, especially law reports and treatises, from the Year Books and Bracton down to the American state reports and today's electronic services; and legal education, from the founding of the Inns of Court to the emergence and growth of university law schools in the United States. History of the Common Law offers: dynamic teaching materials that include primary sources, scholarship, summaries, notes, and questions judiciously selected and edited sources over 250 illustrations--many in full color "Living Law "units that connect legal-historical developments to modern law an illustrated timeline that highlights key dates a comprehensive Teacher's Manual, with suggestions for using the book in a two- or three-credit course Vivid writing, engaging source materials, and lavish illustrations breathe life into nearly 1,000 years of Anglo-American legal history. Concise summaries, manageable extracts, clear organization, and a detailed Teacher's Manual consistently support your teaching. *Teacher's Manuals are a professional courtesy offered to professors only. For more information or to request a copy, please contact Aspen Publishers at 800-950-5259 or [email protected]