Just My Soul Responding

Author: Brian Ward
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135370036
Size: 12.70 MB
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Brian Ward is Lecturer in American History at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne .; This book is intended for american studies, American history postwar social and cultural history, political history, Black history, Race and Ethnic studies and Cultural studies together with the general trade music.

Just My Soul Responding

Author: Brian Ward
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520212985
Size: 39.16 MB
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Explores the relationship between rhythm and blues and race relations

Just My Soul Responding

Author: Brian Ward
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0203214455
Size: 72.30 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Brian Ward is Lecturer in American History at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne .; This book is intended for american studies, American history postwar social and cultural history, political history, Black history, Race and Ethnic studies and Cultural studies together with the general trade music.

Just My Soul Responding

Author: Brian Ward
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781439503232
Size: 58.49 MB
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Explores the relationship between rhythm and blues and race relations

Higher Ground

Author: Craig Werner
Publisher: Crown Archetype
ISBN: 0307420876
Size: 58.53 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In Higher Ground, one of our most insightful music writers brilliantly reinterprets the lives of three pop geniuses and the soul revolution they launched. Soul music is one of America's greatest cultural achievements, and Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, and Curtis Mayfield are three of its most inspired practitioners. In midcentury America it was soul music--particularly the dazzling stream of recordings made by these three stars--that helped bring the gospel vision of the black church into the mainstream, energizing the era’s social movements and defining a new American gospel where the sacred and the secular met. What made this gospel all the more amazing was that its most influential articulators were the sons and daughters of sharecroppers, storefront preachers, and single parents in the projects, whose genius gave voice to a new vision of American possibility. Higher Ground seamlessly weaves the specific and intensely personal narratives of Stevie, Aretha, and Curtis’s lives into the historical fabric of their times. The three shared many similarities: They were all children of the great migration and of the black church. But the gospel impulse manifested itself in different ways within the dramas of their individual lives and musical creations. In Stevie Wonder’s case, it was a literally color-blind universal sense of spirituality that expressed itself in his life and music as an urge toward transcendence, particularly in the mid-seventies when albums like Innervisions and Songs in the Key of Life radically revised what a pop album could be. For Aretha Franklin, the traditional gospel vision of a beloved community anchored in the strength of women comforted her through a life littered with tragedy and found expression in propulsive pop songs like "Respect" as well as in her legendary gospel albums. And for Curtis Mayfield, the gospel notion of conscious living inspired him to create songs that served the purposes of the Civil Rights movement and the radical Black Power movement alike, from the gritty street drama of Superfly to the transcendent call of "People Get Ready." Werner doesn't just provide a narrative of three fascinating lives; he ties them together with a provocative thesis about American history and culture that compels us to reconsider both the music and the times. And aside from the personalities and the history, he writes beautifully about music itself, the nuts and bolts of its creation and performance, in a way that brings a new awareness and understanding to the most familiar music, forcing readers to listen to songs they've heard a thousand times with fresh ears. In Higher Ground, Werner illuminates the lives of three unparalleled American artists, reminding us why their music mattered then and still resonates with us today. From the Hardcover edition.

Media Culture And The Modern African American Freedom Struggle

Author: Brian Ward
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780813020747
Size: 12.78 MB
Format: PDF
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"A dazzling array of essays that vastly expands our understanding of the role of the media and popular culture in the politics of race. From Andy Griffith to Amiri Baraka, from Leadbelly's blues to "Sweet Sweetback's Baaadassss Song," this is a brilliant and irreplaceable collection."--Timothy B. Tyson, University of Wisconsin-Madison, author of Radio Free Dixie: Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power Stimulating and insightful, these essays on the relationship among the media, popular culture, and the postwar African American freedom struggle offer new perspectives on the nature of the Civil Rights Movement and its legacies. At the same time, they suggest how much the struggle itself shaped important trends in American culture and mass media in the 1950s and 1960s. Bringing together a range of voices seldom heard together, this book challenges readers to reconsider the ways in which a simplistic "master narrative" of the Movement has come to dominate popular, and even some scholarly, understandings of the meaning of the freedom struggle. CONTENTS Introduction: Forgotten Wails and Master Narratives: Media, Culture, and Memories of the Modern African American Freedom Struggle, by Brian Ward 1. The Media and the Movement: Looking Back from the Southern Front, by Julian Bond 2. A Media-Made Movement? Black Violence and Nonviolence in the Historiography of the Civil Rights Movement, by Jenny Walker 3. Black-Oriented Radio and the Civil Rights Movement, by Stephen Walsh 4. Reclaiming the South: Civil Rights Films and the New Red Menace, by Allison Graham 5. Hip Like Me: Racial Cross-Dressing in Pop Music Before Elvis, by David Chappell 6. "Climbing the Mountain Top": African American Blues and Gospel Songs from the Civil Rights Years, by Guido van Rijn 7. Free Jazz: Musical Style and Liberationist Ethic, 1956-1965, by Peter Townsend 8. Jazz and Soul, Race and Class, Cultural Nationalists and Black Panthers: A Black Power Debate Revisited, by Brian Ward 9. Villains, Demons, and Social Bandits: White Fear of the Black Cultural Revolution, by William L. Van Deburg 10. "Pimpin' Ain't Easy": Work, Play, and "Lifestylization" of the Black Pimp Figure in Early 1970s America, by Eithne Quinn 11. Mau-Mauing the Filmmakers: Should Black Power Take the Rap for Killing Nat Turner, the Movie? by Scot French 12. "The 1960s Echo On": Images of Martin Luther King Jr. as Deployed by White Writers of Contemporary Fiction, by Sharon Monteith 13. The Power of Martyrdom: The Incorporation of Martin Luther King and His Philosophy into African American Literature, by Trudier Harris Brian Ward, associate professor of American history at the University of Florida, is the author of Just My Soul Responding: Rhythm and Blues, Black Consciousness and Race Relations and coeditor of The Making of Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement.

The 1960s

Author: Brian Ward
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1405163291
Size: 57.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Drawn from a wide range of perspectives and showcasing a variety of primary source materials, Brian Ward?s The 1960s: A Documentary Reader highlights the most important themes of the era. Supplies students with over 50 primary documents on the turbulent period of the 1960s in the United States Includes speeches, court decisions, acts of Congress, secret memos, song lyrics, cartoons, photographs, news reports, advertisements, and first-hand testimony A comprehensive introduction, document headnotes, and questions at the end of each chapter are designed to encourage students to engage with the material critically

Women And Popular Music

Author: Sheila Whiteley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113512180X
Size: 54.21 MB
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Women and Popular Music explores the changing role of women musicians and the ways in which their songs resonate in popular culture. Sheila Whiteley begins by examining the counter-culture's reactionary attitudes to women through the lyrics of The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. She explores the ways in which artists like Joplin and Joni Mitchell confronted issues of sexuality and freedom, redefining women's participation in the industry, and assesses the personal cost of their achievements. She considers how stars such as Annie Lennox, Madonna and k.d. lang have confronted issues of gender stereotyping and sexuality, through pop videos for 'Justify My Love' and 'Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)', and looks at the enduring importance of the singer-songwriter through artists such as Tracey Chapman. Lastly, she assesses the contribution of contemporary artists including Tori Amos, P.J. Harvey and Courtney Love, and asks whether the Spice Girls are just a 'cartoon feminist pop group' or if they provide positive role models for teenage girls.

Framing The South

Author: Allison Graham
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801874451
Size: 47.79 MB
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"In a series of interlocking essays, Graham deftly explores the ways Hollywood filmmakers and television producers tried to reformulate stock southern characters in light of rapidly changing social relations... A fascinating and compelling cultural history that should be of use to a wide array of scholars." -- American Studies

A R Pioneers

Author: Brian Ward
Publisher: Co-Published with the Country
ISBN: 9780826521750
Size: 31.29 MB
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The business men and women of the early twentieth century who scouted musical talent, worked with artists to shape, market, and sell their sound, and, in the process, created the genres of race and hillbilly music