Iutam Symposium Transsonicum Iv

Author: H. Sobieczky
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401000174
Size: 40.97 MB
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"Symposium Transsonicum" was founded by Klaus Oswatitsch four decades ago when there was clearly a need for a systematic treatment of flow problems in the higher speed regime in aeronautics. The first conference in 1962 brought together scientists concerned with fundamental problems involving the sonic flow speed regime. Results of the conference provided an understanding of some basic tran sonic phenomena by proposing mathematical methods that allowed for the de velopment of practical calculations. The "Transonic Controversy" (about shock free flows) was still an open issue after this meeting. In 1975 the second symposium was held, by then there was much understanding in how to avoid shocks in a steady plane flow to be designed, but still very little was known in unsteady phenomena due to a lack of elucidating experiments. A third meeting in 1988 reflected the availability oflarger computers which allowed the numerical analysis of flows with shocks to a reasonable accuracy. Because we are trying to keep Oswatitsch's heritage in science alive especially in Gottingen, we were asked by the aerospace research community to organize another symposium. Much had been achieved already in the knowledge, techno logy and applications in transonics, so IUT AM had to be convinced that a fourth meeting would not just be a reunion of old friends reminiscing some scientific past. The scientific committee greatly supported my efforts to invite scientists ac tively working in transonic problems which still pose substantial difficulties to ae rospace and turbomachinery industry.

Iutam Symposium On Reynolds Number Scaling In Turbulent Flow

Author: Alexander J. Smits
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400709978
Size: 40.74 MB
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This volume presents selected papers from the IUTAM Symposium on Reynolds Number Scaling in Turbulent Flow, convened in Princeton, NJ, USA, September I1-13, 2002. The behavior ofturbulence at high Reynolds number is interesting from a fundamental point of view, in that most theories of turbulence make very specific predictions in the limit of infinite Reynolds number. From a more practical point of view, there exist many applications that involve turbulent flow where the Reynolds numbers are extremely large. For example, large vehicles such as submarines and commercial transports operate at Reynolds 9 numbers based on length ofthe order oft0 , and industrial pipe flows cover a 7 very wide range of Reynolds numbers up to 10 • Many very important applications of high Reynolds number flow pertain to atmospheric and other geophysical flows where extremely high Reynolds numbers are the rule rather than the exception, and the understanding of climate changes and the prediction of destructive weather effects hinges to some extent on our appreciation ofhigh-Reynolds number turbulence behavior. The important effects of Reynolds number on turbulence has received a great deal of recent attention. The objective of the Symposium was to bring together many of the world's experts in this area to appraise the new experimental results, discuss new scaling laws and turbulence models, and to enhance our mutual understanding of turbulence.

Iutam Symposium On Integrated Modeling Of Fully Coupled Fluid Structure Interactions Using Analysis Computations And Experiments

Author: Haym Benaroya
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781402018060
Size: 46.23 MB
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This plenary paper and the accompanying presentation have highlighted field problems involving fluid-structure interaction over a wide span of Navy operations. Considering the vast size and versatility of the Navy's inventory, the cases presented represent examples of a much larger problem. But even this limited set provides sufficient evidence that fluid-structure interaction does hinder the Navy's ability to accomplish its missions. This survey has also established that there are no accurate and generally applicable design tools for addressing these problems. In the majority of cases the state-of-practice is to either make ad-hoc adjustments and estimates based on historical evidence, or conduct expensive focused tests directed at each specific problem and/or candidate solution. Unfortunately, these approaches do not provide insight into the fundamental problem, and neither can be considered reliable regarding their likelihood of success. So the opportunities for applying computational fluid-structure interaction modeling to Navy problems appear limitless. Scenarios range from the "simple" resonant strumming of underwater and in-air cables, to the "self-contained" flow field and vibration of aircraft/ordnance bodies at various Mach numbers, to violent underwater transient detonations and local hull structural collapse. Generally applicable and computationally tractable design-oriented models for these phenomena are of course still far in the future. But the Navy has taken the first steps in that direction by sponsoring specialized numerical models, validation experiments tailored for specific applications, and conferences such as this one.