It Takes A Village

Author: Hillary Rodham Clinton
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416574646
Size: 16.94 MB
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In celebration of the tenth anniversary of It Takes a Village, this splendid edition includes photographs and a new Introduction by Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. A decade ago, then First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton chronicled her quest -- both deeply personal and, in the truest sense, public -- to help make our society into the kind of village that enables children to become smart, able, resilient adults. It Takes a Village is "a textbook for caring.... Filled with truths that are worth a read, and a reread" (The Dallas Morning News). For more than thirty-five years, Senator Clinton has made children her passion and her cause. Her long experience -- not only through her roles as mother, daughter, sister, and wife but also as advocate, legal expert, and public servant -- has strengthened her conviction that how children develop and what they need to succeed are inextricably entwined with the society in which they live and how well it sustains and supports its families and individuals. In other words, it takes a village to raise a child. In her new Introduction, Senator Clinton reflects on how our village has changed over the last decade -- from the impact of the Internet to new research in early child development and education. She discusses issues of increasing concern -- security, the environment, the national debt -- and looks at where we have made progress and where there is still work to be done. It Takes a Village has become a classic. As relevant as ever, this anniversary edition makes it abundantly clear that the choices we make today about how we raise our children and how we support families will determine how our nation will face the challenges of this century.

It Takes A Village

Author: Hillary Rodham Clinton
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780788193323
Size: 24.80 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5021
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In celebration of the tenth anniversary of "It Takes a Village, " this splendid edition includes photographs and a new Introduction by Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. A decade ago, then First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton chronicled her quest -- both deeply personal and, in the truest sense, public -- to help make our society into the kind of village that enables children to become smart, able, resilient adults. "It Takes a Village" is "a textbook for caring.... Filled with truths that are worth a read, and a reread" "(The Dallas Morning News)." For more than thirty-five years, Senator Clinton has made children her passion and her cause. Her long experience -- not only through her roles as mother, daughter, sister, and wife but also as advocate, legal expert, and public servant -- has strengthened her conviction that how children develop and what they need to succeed are inextricably entwined with the society in which they live and how well it sustains and supports its families and individuals. In other words, it takes a village to raise a child. In her new Introduction, Senator Clinton reflects on how our village has changed over the last decade -- from the impact of the Internet to new research in early child development and education. She discusses issues of increasing concern -- security, the environment, the national debt -- and looks at where we have made progress and where there is still work to be done. "It Takes a Village" has become a classic. As relevant as ever, this anniversary edition makes it abundantly clear that the choices we make today about how we raise our children and how we support families will determine how our nation will face the challenges of this century.

It Takes A Village

Author: Hillary Rodham Clinton
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1481430874
Size: 32.96 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6933
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"It Takes a Village offers a universal, unifying message. It captures perfectly Clinton's vision of a multicultural America working toward a constructive goal. So hopeful and forward-looking." --The Washington Post "Inspired by her 2006 book of the same name, Clinton's unadorned text celebrates how civic spirit emerges...Most of the storytelling is found in Frazee's delicately textured images, which exude energy, hope, and emotional authenticity." --Publishers Weekly "This work is a welcome reminder that all people 'are born believers. And citizens, too.'" --Shelf Awareness "What does it take to change the world?" Former Secretary of State and Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Rodham Clinton's first book for young readers, inspired by the themes of her classic New York Times bestselling book It Takes a Village, and illustrated by two-time Caldecott Honor recipient Marla Frazee, asks readers what can they do to make the world a better place? It Takes a Village tells the heartwarming and universal story of a diverse community coming together to make a difference. All kinds of people working together, playing together, and living together in harmony makes a better village and many villages coming together can make a better world. Together we can build a better life for one another. Together we can change our world. The book will resonate with children and families and through the generations as it encourages readers to look for a way they can make a difference. It is a book that you will surely want to read again and again, a book you will want to share and a book that will inspire.

Modern Jeremiahs

Author: Mark Stephen Jendrysik
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1461633796
Size: 23.29 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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One of the most enduring themes in American political discourse is the idea of decline. Since the very beginnings of the European settlement of North America there have been voices pointing to an inevitable regression of the people from the standards set by heroic ancestors. This discourse of decay has often taken the form of the jeremiad in which public intellectuals, pundits, and politicians point to the causes of decline and call for a return to older and nobler standards of conduct. The Jeremiad has seen a revival in the last 25 years. Jendrysik traces the history of this form of political discourse from its modern reinvention by Allan Bloom to its current uses by such figures as Bill O'Reilly and Hillary Clinton.

Dear Socks Dear Buddy

Author: Hillary Rodham Clinton
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684857782
Size: 59.99 MB
Format: PDF
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Collects children's letters to the White House dog and cat

Living History

Author: Hillary Rodham Clinton
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780743222259
Size: 60.63 MB
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The author chronicles her eight years as First Lady of the United States, looking back on her husband's two administrations, the challenges she faced during the period, the impeachment crisis, and her own political work.

2016 The Campaign Chronicles

Author: JD Foster
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1524576492
Size: 58.83 MB
Format: PDF
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How did Donald Trump, a man with zero direct political experience and no particular affiliation to either political party go in the span of a two-year campaign from preposterous aspirant to President-elect of the United States? It will likely take years, if not decades, before a confident consensus develops, but formulating an answer begins with chronicling the key events in the campaign, in the country, and sometimes in the wider world as they happened. This book is an attempt to provide such a chronicle, by no means the last word but perhaps a useful and entertaining first word toward answering the question, What the heck?

He Ll Be Ok Growing Gorgeous Boys Into Good Men 10th Anniversary Edition

Author: Celia Lashlie
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 177549117X
Size: 55.64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The 10th anniversary edition of the iconic book that takes parents into the mysterious world of boys, with new foreword, introduction and tribute to the author. THE TENTH ANNIVERSARY EDITION OF A PARENTING CLASSIC How do you raise boys to men in a world where trouble beckons at every turn? How do you make sure they learn the 'right' lessons, stay out of danger, find a path to follow? How do you ensure they'll be OK? Celia Lashlie has some of the answers. After years working in the prison service, she knows what can happen when boys make the wrong choices. She also knows what it's like to be a parent - she raised a son on her own and feared for his survival. As a crucial part of the Good Man Project, she talked to 180 classes of boys. Her insights into what boys need - and what parents can do to help them - are ground-breaking. In this new edition of her honest, no-nonsense and best-selling book, Celia reveals what goes on inside the world of boys. With clarity and insight, she offers parents - especially mothers - practical and reassuring advice on raising their boys to become good, loving, articulate men. "Celia did an enormous amount of work, particularly standing up for at risk young people, and she made an enormous contribution." - New Zealand Prime Minister John Key

Dumbing Us Down

Author: John Taylor Gatto
Publisher: New Society Publishers
ISBN: 1771422440
Size: 68.62 MB
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John Taylor Gatto’s radical treatise on public education, a New Society Publishers bestseller for 25 years, continues to advocate for the unshackling of children and learning from formal schooling. Now, in an ever-more-rapidly changing world with an explosion of alternative routes to learning, it’s poised to continue to shake the world of institutional education for many more years.

It Takes A Village To Name A Child

Author: Chinazor Onianwah
Publisher: Chinazor Onianwah
ISBN:
Size: 42.83 MB
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With vivid illustrations and abrasive insight, Chinazor Onianwah gathers strewn skeletal remains of Africa’s history, fleshes it out and breadths air into it in typical griot style; this is the Africa that comes alive in this narrative, "It Takes A Village to Name a Child, Celebrating the bestowment of Ancestry, Faith, Identity and Legacy of African roots of Biblical Hebrews." In this narrative, which intertwines history, archeological data and mythology, he compels his readers to re-evaluate stereotypes and what it means to be African. Not only would any reader – African or non-African – be amazed at what they never knew that they never knew of Africa; they may find it endearing to be African. After all, it was barely 60,000 years ago that we all came out of Africa. Painstakingly, Chinazor employs his wealth of experience as a news reporter/researcher to connect dots of historical events since the beginning of time through Biblical "Genesis" to the present day to render a befitting portraiture of Africa. And in so doing, answered frequently asked questions: Why a naming ceremony is essential for an African child Why the African is the forbearer of Biblical Hebrews. How the Ashkenazim (European Jews) usurped Hebraism and the Holy Land Are blacks less intelligent than whites? What is in a name like Barack Hussein Obama? Why Africa is so rich yet so poor Excerpt: On October 14, 2007, a few months after Barack Obama announced his candidacy in the US Democratic presidential race, a biographical article appeared in Britain’s Sunday Times Magazine about Dr. James Watson, the American molecular biologist, who is best known as the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA. It said he was "inherently gloomy about the prospect of Africa as all our social policies are based on the fact that their intelligence is the same as ours — whereas all the testing says not really." In what appears to be a response to racists who hold similar views as Dr. James Watson, in a paper titled "Did they or didn’t they invent it? Iron in Sub-Saharan Africa," Stanley B. Alpern wrote, "The idea that sub-Saharan Africans independently invented iron is more than a century old. It goes back at least to a German scholar, Ludwig Beck, who published a five-volume history of iron between 1884 and 1903. In the first volume he wrote, "We see everywhere an original art of producing iron among the numerous native tribes of Africa, which is in its entire essence not imported but original and . . . must be very old." Around the same time some Egyptologists, notably the Frenchman Gaston Maspéro, concluded that ancient Egypt had learned its iron working from black Africans to the south. The German Felix von Luschan, better known among Africanists for his writings on the art of old Benin, also thought sub-Saharan Africans originated iron technology, as did the British metallurgist William Gowland..." The night Barack Obama stood to address the world on his victory as the first African American to win the US Presidency; he was standing against the backdrop of hundreds of years of a racist belief that blacks are inferior to whites. This notion of blacks as inferior to their white counterpart reached its apogee when European governments led by Great Britain embarked on a vigorous campaign to promote the virtues of colonialism by denigrating the natives of the colonies and claiming that the savages needed to be civilized by the ‘white man’. Public displays of indigenous people were held for scientific and leisure purposes. Between 1877 and 1912, approximately thirty “ethnological exhibitions” were presented at the Jardin zoologique d’acclimatation. “Negro villages” were major draws in the Paris’ 1878 and 1879 World’s Fair; the 1900 World’s Fair presented the famous diorama “living” in Madagascar. At the same time, the Colonial Exhibitions in Marseilles (1906 and 1922) and in Paris (1907 and 1931) displayed Africans in cages, often in stark nudity.