Intelligence Testing And Minority Students

Author: Richard R. Valencia
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761912316
Size: 79.74 MB
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Intelligence Testing and Minority Students offers the reader a fresh opportunity to re-learn and re-consider the implications of intelligence testing. Richard R. Valencia and Lisa A. Suzuki discuss the strengths and limitations of IQ testing relative to the factors which may contribute to biased results. They review the history of the adaptation and adoption of intelligence testing; evaluate the heredity-environment debate; discuss the specific performance factors which apply to IQ testing of those in minority ethnic groups. This practical book offers the practitioner a good sense of what can be done to make testing and education serve the needs of all students fairly and validly, whatever their background.

Bias In Mental Testing

Author: Arthur Robert Jensen
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 80.87 MB
Format: PDF
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Illuminating detailed methods for assessing bias in commonly used I.Q., aptitude, and achievement tests, Jensen argues that standardized tests are not biased against Englishspeaking minority groups and describes the uses of such tests in education and emp

The Black White Test Score Gap

Author: Christopher Jencks
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 9780815746119
Size: 58.29 MB
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The test score gap between blacks and whites--on vocabulary, reading, and math tests, as well as on tests that claim to measure scholastic aptitude and intelligence--is large enough to have far-reaching social and economic consequences. In their introduction to this book, Christopher Jencks and Meredith Phillips argue that eliminating the disparity would dramatically reduce economic and educational inequality between blacks and whites. Indeed, they think that closing the gap would do more to promote racial equality than any other strategy now under serious discussion. The book offers a comprehensive look at the factors that contribute to the test score gap and discusses options for substantially reducing it. Although significant attempts have been made over the past three decades to shrink the test score gap, including increased funding for predominantly black schools, desegregation of southern schools, and programs to alleviate poverty, the median black American still scores below 75 percent of American whites on most standardized tests. The book brings together recent evidence on some of the most controversial and puzzling aspects of the test score debate, including the role of test bias, heredity, and family background. It also looks at how and why the gap has changed over the past generation, reviews the educational, psychological, and cultural explanations for the gap, and analyzes its educational and economic consequences. The authors demonstrate that traditional explanations account for only a small part of the black-white test score gap. They argue that this is partly because traditional explanations have put too much emphasis on racial disparities in economic resources, both in homes and in schools, and on demographic factors like family structure. They say that successful theories will put more emphasis on psychological and cultural factors, such as the way black and white parents teach their children to deal with things they do not know or understand, and the way black and white children respond to the same classroom experiences. Finally, they call for large-scale experiments to determine the effects of schools' racial mix, class size, ability grouping, and other policies. In addition to the editors, the contributors include Claude Steele, Ronald Ferguson, William G. Bowen, Philip Cook, and William Julius Wilson.

The Evolution Of Deficit Thinking

Author: Richard R. Valencia
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136368361
Size: 44.50 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Deficit thinking refers to the notion that students, particularly low income minority students, fail in school because they and their families experience deficiencies that obstruct the leaning process (e.g. limited intelligence, lack of motivation, inadequate home socialization). Tracing the evolution of deficit thinking, the authors debunk the pseudo-science and offer more plausible explanations of why students fail.

Assessing Intelligence In Children And Adolescents

Author: John H. Kranzler
Publisher: Guilford Press
ISBN: 146251121X
Size: 42.18 MB
Format: PDF
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"Subject Areas/Keywords: adolescents, assessments, children, cognitive assessment, elementary, giftedness, intellectual assessment, intellectual disabilities, intelligence testing, IQ, learning disabilities, psychological assessment reports, psychometrics, response to intervention, RTI, school psychology, secondary, SLD, specific learning disability, tests"--

Minority Students In Special And Gifted Education

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309170818
Size: 42.33 MB
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Special education and gifted and talented programs were designed for children whose educational needs are not well met in regular classrooms. From their inceptions, these programs have had disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic minority students. What causes this disproportion? Is it a problem? Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education considers possible contributors to that disparity, including early biological and environmental influences and inequities in opportunities for preschool and K-12 education, as well as the possibilities of bias in the referral and assessment system that leads to placement in special programs. It examines the data on early childhood experience, on differences in educational opportunity, and on referral and placement. The book also considers whether disproportionate representation should be considered a problem. Do special education programs provide valuable educational services, or do they set students off on a path of lower educational expectations? Would students not now placed in gifted and talented programs benefit from raised expectations, more rigorous classes, and the gifted label, or would they suffer failure in classes for which they are unprepared? By examining this important problem in U.S. education and making recommendations for early intervention and general education, as well as for changes in referral and assessment processes, Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education will be an indispensable resource to educators throughout the nation, as well as to policy makers at all levels, from schools and school districts to the state and federal governments.

Perspectives On Bias In Mental Testing

Author: Cecil Reynolds
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1468446584
Size: 29.60 MB
Format: PDF
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The cultural-test-bias hypothesis is one of the most important scien tific questions facing psychology today. Briefly, the cultural-test-bias hypothesis contends that all observed group differences in mental test scores are due to a built-in cultural bias of the tests themselves; that is, group score differences are an artifact of current psychomet ric methodology. If the cultural-test-bias hypothesis is ultimately shown to be correct, then the 100 years or so of psychological research on human differences (or differential psychology, the sci entific discipline underlying all applied areas of human psychology including clinical, counseling, school, and industrial psychology) must be reexamined and perhaps dismissed as confounded, contam inated, or otherwise artifactual. In order to continue its existence as a scientific discipline, psychology must confront the cultural-test-bias hypothesis from the solid foundations of data and theory and must not allow the resolution of this issue to occur solely within (and to be determined by) the political Zeitgeist of the times or any singular work, no matter how comprehensive. In his recent volume Bias in Mental Testing (New York: Free Press, 1980), Arthur Jensen provided a thorough review of most of the empirical research relevant to the evaluation of cultural bias in psychological and educational tests that was available at the time that his book was prepared. Nevertheless, Jensen presented only one per spective on those issues in a volume intended not only for the sci entific community but for intelligent laypeople as well.

Meeting The Psychoeducational Needs Of Minority Students

Author: Craig L. Frisby
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470940751
Size: 74.85 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Dr. Frisby focuses a bright light on issues that often remain obscured in a fog of polemics, deeply held convictions, and genuine concern for the plight of minority students. Meeting the Psychoeducational Needs of Minority Students cuts through this fog with intense, sharp, clear thinking and data-driven conclusions." —Jeffrey P. Braden, PhD, Professor of Psychology and Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, North Carolina State University "Going beyond superficial 'feel good' or 'feel bad' ideologies to probe what really makes a difference in meeting the needs of often underserved populations, Craig Frisby provides a comprehensive, rigorous, well-written, and entertaining (honest!) work that addresses the intersection of race, ethnicity, and education." —Betty Henry, PhD, School Psychologist, California School for the Blind "Dr. Frisby makes a perceptive and incisive assessment of much of the multicultural ideology currently propagated in professional psychology and education and directly confronts some of the major issues surrounding multiculturalism. Unlike many other critiques that have been proffered over the last few decades, however, Meeting the Psychoeducational Needs of Minority Students also provides many concrete solutions for how to begin changing the current milieu." —A. Alexander Beaujean, PhD, Associate Professor, Baylor University A practical, research-based guide to facilitating positive educational outcomes for racial, ethnic, and language minority students This timely book is written from the perspective of contemporary school psychology for a variety of school personnel, including school psychologists, teachers, guidance counselors, and administrators, with coverage of: The problem of quack multiculturalism Home and family Context for school learning General cognitive ability, learning, and instruction Testing and assessment School discipline and behavior management Crime, delinquency, and gangs School district resources

Learning Potential Assessment

Author: J.H.M. Hamers
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9789026512384
Size: 66.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Learning potential assessment, which has lately been receiving a great deal of attention, consists of test procedures for measuring children's learning potential procedures that be regarded as an extension of current intelligence testing. The 17 chapters included in this volume are based on papers p

Special Education Law

Author: Steven S. Goldberg
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461592453
Size: 41.38 MB
Format: PDF
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To any professional concerned with exceptional children, it would be the greatest understatement to say that the courts and legislatures have had a tremendous impact on the field of speeial education. Especially in the last decade, a flood of litigation filed to develop and define the right to education of previously unserved handicapped children has left no special education teacher, school adminis trator, nurse, educational psychologist, or pediatrician unaffected-either be cause these professionals are daily called upon to help children, or because they may come forward as witnesses on behalf of children who are the subjects of special education meetings, individualized education programs, placement hear ings, or judicial proceedings. Thus, for these people, questions regarding a student's legal rights are immediate and pervasive. This book developed out of the need to provide nonlegal professionals with a lawyer's view of the huge body of court cases and federal laws and regulations that affect their practice as well as their students and clients. An introductory chapter provides the historical basis of the current interface between law and special education. The Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 and Sec tion 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and their regulations promulgated in 1977, are the major national laws in the field ~nd are therefore described in Chapters 2 and 3.