Integrating Knowledge Through Interdisciplinary Research

Author: Dominic Holland
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113449016X
Size: 29.30 MB
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In this important new text, Holland seeks to explain, by means of social scientific and philosophical inquiry, the difficulties that researchers often experience when attempting to integrate knowledge from different academic disciplines, either individually or as part of a team of subject specialists. It is argued that the difficulty of integrating knowledge from different academic disciplines is the result of, firstly, an inadequate justification of the nature of scientific integration and differentiation and, secondly, the dominance of disciplinary specialization in scientific inquiry. By focusing on both the theoretical justification for, and the practical feasibility of, integrating knowledge through interdisciplinary research, this book asks what properties of reality make the integration of knowledge from different academic disciplines possible and to what extent it is feasible to integrate knowledge through interdisciplinary research within a traditional, disciplinary context. Accordingly the text is both philosophical and social scientific in content: philosophical in the sense that it presents a theory of causal determination, which will help researchers to understand how reality is both differentiated and interconnected; social scientific in the sense that it presents the results of three case studies of collaborative interdisciplinary research projects. The book is heavily informed by the philosophy of critical realism. The philosophical argument about the possibility of integration and specialization in science draws explicitly on some of the key concepts of critical realism – particularly those comprising the theory of ‘integrative pluralism’ – while critical realist assumptions underpin the social scientific argument about the causal influence of the social system of knowledge production. By exploring researchers’ conceptions of knowledge and of reality on the one hand and their decisions about what sort of knowledge to produce on the other, Holland shows how the difficulty of scientific integration is both a problem of knowledge and a problem of knowledge production. This book is essential reading for students and academics interested in the emerging topic of knowledge integration and interdisciplinarity.

Sport Coaching Research And Practice

Author: Julian North
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317620437
Size: 34.85 MB
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Research shapes our understanding of practice in powerful and important ways, in sports coaching as in any other discipline. This innovative study explores the philosophical foundations of sport coaching research, examining the often implicit links between research process and practice, descriptions and prescriptions. Arguing that the assumptions of traditional single-disciplinary accounts, such as those based in psychology or sociology, risk over-simplifying our understanding of coaching, this book presents an alternative framework for sports coaching research based on critical realism. The result is an embedded, relational and emergent conception of coaching practice that opens new ways of thinking about coaching knowledge. Drawing on new empirical case study research, it demonstrates vividly how a critical realist-informed approach can provide a more realistic and accountable knowledge to coaching stakeholders. This knowledge promises to have important implications for coaching, and coach education and development practices. Sport Coaching Research and Practice: Ontology, Interdisciplinarity and Critical Realism is fascinating reading for any student or researcher working in sports coaching, sport pedagogy, physical education, the philosophy or sociology of sport, or research methodology in sport and exercise.

Interdisciplinarity And Wellbeing

Author: Roy Bhaskar
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 135170995X
Size: 57.41 MB
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In this book, the authors provide a much-needed general theory of interdisciplinarity and relate it to health/wellbeing research and professional practice. In so doing they make it possible for practitioners of the different disciplines to communicate without contradiction or compromise, resolving the tensions that beset much interdisciplinary work. Such a general theory is only possible if we assume that there is more to being (ontology) than empirical being (what we can measure directly). Therefore, the unique approach to interdisciplinarity applied in this book starts from ontology, namely that there is a multimechanismicity (a multiplicity of mechanisms) in open systems, and then moves to epistemology. By contrast, the mainstream approach, which fails to acknowledge ontology, is “unserious” and tends to result in a methodological hierarchy, unconducive of interdisciplinarity, in which empiricist science is overtly or tacitly assumed to be the superior version of science. This book is primarily aimed at those people interested in improving health and wellbeing – such as researchers, policy-makers, educators, and general practitioners. However, it will also be useful to academics engaged in the broader academic debate on interdisciplinary metatheory.

Transdisciplinary Professional Learning And Practice

Author: Paul Gibbs
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319115901
Size: 39.28 MB
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This book presents thinking about and through transdisciplinary and professional development as an educative process. Rather than focusing on the delineation of the approaches offered, an analysis of these contributions points to commonality in those problems that benefit from a transdisciplinary perspective. The core elements of transdisciplinarity can lead to what might be called metanoia - another way of knowing; a knowing which is ‘beyond that which is creative and transformative. This poses challenges for the practice of all professionals and is the core issue that this book addresses. The book brings together the constituting views of transdisciplinarity, or metanoia, and focus them on current professional practice.​ The book is structured in two parts and five sections. The first part deals with key issues in Transdisciplinarity; its actuality and how it creates knowledge. Section 1 has three original papers which look at Transdisciplinarity from a different lens. Especially, the Islamic voice has not been heard in this context before. Section 2 considers the knowledge aspect of Transdisciplinarity and how this might be confronted with existing disciplinary knowledge. Part 2 of the book is directly focused on professionals and their education. The third section considers research pedagogy and graduate education for the professional. This is followed in section 4 which offers a discussion on team work. In the final section six chapters present the transdisciplinary practitioner in different contexts.

A Hospice In Change

Author: Martin Lipscomb
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134637098
Size: 55.50 MB
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A Hospice in Change: Applied Social Realist Theory reports upon a study into aspects of the ways in which structural and organisational developments, professional cultures and ‘bedside’ or patient focused clinical practice interact within a single UK institution. While the findings of this study are time and context specific, the events and social processes being described may nonetheless resonate closely with the experience of healthcare practitioners at other hospices both within and without the UK. The work examines themes and ideas that hospice and palliative care practitioners, as well as those involved or interested more broadly in ‘end of life issues’, may find relevant. It is argued that differential morphogenesis can be identified between structures (social and cultural) and agents (individual and group) at an independent healthcare charity in southern England. A Hospice in Change connects theory and philosophy with concrete research practice to provide a worked example of Margaret Archer’s realist social theory.

Critical Realism

Author: Margaret Archer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136287256
Size: 75.15 MB
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Critical realism is a movement in philosophy and the human sciences most closely associated with the work of Roy Bhaskar. Since the publication of Bhaskars A Realist Theory of Science, critical realism has had a profound influence on a wide range of subjects. This reader makes accessible, in one volume, key readings to stimulate debate about and within critical realism. It explores the following themes: * transcendental realist * the theory of explanatory critique * dialectics * Bhaskar's critical naturalist philosophy of science.

Dictionary Of Critical Realism

Author: Mervyn Hartwig
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317420705
Size: 22.43 MB
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Dictionary of Critical Realism fulfils a vital gap in the literature, Critical Realism is often criticised for being too opaque and deploying too much jargon, thereby making the concepts inaccessible for a wider audience. However, as Hartwig puts it 'Just as the tools of the various skilled trades need to be precision-engineered for specific, interrelated functions, so meta-theory requires concepts honed for specific interrelated tasks: it is impossible to think creatively at that level without them.' This Dictionary seeks to redress this problem; to throw open the important contribution of Critical Realism to a wider audience for the first time, by thoroughly explaining all the key concepts and key developments. It includes 500 entries on these themes, and has contributions from major players in field. However this text does not stop there, it goes further than simply elucidating the concepts and includes a number of essays which use the notions in important areas, thereby demonstrating the appropriate use of the concepts in action to encourage their wider use. This book will become a requisite reference tool for Critical Realist scholars and Philosophers and Social scientists alike will enjoy this vital introduction and explanatory text of the indispensable ideas contained within the dynamic and vibrant school of Critical Realism.

Approaches And Methodologies In The Social Sciences

Author: Donatella Della Porta
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139474596
Size: 70.61 MB
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A revolutionary textbook introducing masters and doctoral students to the major research approaches and methodologies in the social sciences. Written by an outstanding set of scholars, and derived from successful course teaching, this volume will empower students to choose their own approach to research, to justify this approach, and to situate it within the discipline. It addresses questions of ontology, epistemology and philosophy of social science, and proceeds to issues of methodology and research design essential for producing a good research proposal. It also introduces researchers to the main issues of debate and contention in the methodology of social sciences, identifying commonalities, historic continuities and genuine differences.

Mis Recognition Social Inequality And Social Justice

Author: Director for the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender Terry Lovell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134137311
Size: 77.34 MB
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Nancy Fraser’s work provides a theory of justice from multiple perspectives which has created a powerful frame for the analysis of political, moral and pragmatic dilemmas in an era of global capitalism and cultural pluralism. It has been developed through dialogue with key contemporary thinkers, including an extended critical exchange with Axel Honneth that touches importantly upon the work of the late Pierre Bourdieu on social suffering. All the essays collected here engage with the work of one or both of these thinkers’. They consider some of the conceptual and philosophical contentions that Fraser’s and Bourdieu’s models have provoked, and offer some compelling examples of their analytical power.

A Social Theory Of The Nation State

Author: Daniel Chernilo
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134150113
Size: 23.64 MB
Format: PDF
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A Social Theory of the Nation-State: the political forms of modernity beyond methodological nationalism, construes a novel and original social theory of the nation-state. It rejects nationalistic ways of thinking that take the nation-state for granted as much as globalist orthodoxy that speaks of its current and definitive decline. Its main aim is therefore to provide a renovated account of the nation-state’s historical development and recent global challenges via an analysis of the writings of key social theorists. This reconstruction of the history of the nation-state into three periods: classical (K. Marx, M. Weber, E. Durkheim) modernist (T. Parsons, R. Aron, R. Bendix, B. Moore) contemporary (M. Mann, E. Hobsbawm, U. Beck, M. Castells, N. Luhmann, J. Habermas) For each phase, it introduces social theory’s key views about the nation-state, its past, present and future. In so doing this book rejects methodological nationalism, the claim that the nation-state is the necessary representation of the modern society, because it misrepresents the nation-state’s own problematic trajectory in modernity. And methodological nationalism is also rejected because it is unable to capture the richness of social theory’s intellectual canon. Instead, via a strong conception of society and a subtler notion of the nation-state, A Social Theory of the Nation-State tries to account for the ‘opacity of the nation-state in modernity’.