Hybrid Cultures

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Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452907536
Size: 74.55 MB
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Examines the threats to Latin American cultural identity in a global marketplace - now with a new introduction!

Hybrid Cultures

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Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9781452900391
Size: 79.24 MB
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Transforming Modernity

Author: Néstor García Canclini
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292789076
Size: 32.43 MB
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Is popular culture merely a process of creating, marketing, and consuming a final product, or is it an expression of the artist's surroundings and an attempt to alter them? Noted Argentine/Mexican anthropologist Néstor García Canclini addresses these questions and more in Transforming Modernity, a translation of Las culturas populares en el capitalismo. Based on fieldwork among the Purépecha of Michoacán, Mexico, some of the most talented artisans of the New World, the book is not so much a work of ethnography as of philosophy—a cultural critique of modernism. García Canclini delineates three interpretations of popular culture: spontaneous creation, which posits that artistic expression is the realization of beauty and knowledge; "memory for sale," which holds that original products are created for sale in the imposed capitalist system; and the tourist outlook, whereby collectibles are created to justify development and to provide insight into what capitalism has achieved. Transforming Modernity argues strongly for popular culture as an instrument of understanding, reproducing, and transforming the social system in order to elaborate and construct class hegemony and to reflect the unequal appropriation and distribution of cultural capital. With its wide scope, this book should appeal to readers within and well beyond anthropology—those interested in cultural theory, social thought, and Mesoamerican culture.

Through The Kaleidoscope

Author: Vivian Schelling
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9781859847497
Size: 30.75 MB
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Explores the experience of the modern in Latin America, including modernity in popular culture, the avant-garde, politics, and religion.

Divergent Modernities

Author: Julio Ramos
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822381095
Size: 69.33 MB
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With a Foreword by José David Saldívar Since its first publication in Spanish nearly a decade ago, Julio Ramos’s Desenucuentros de la modernidad en America Latina por el siglo XIX has been recognized as one of the most important studies of modernity in the western hemisphere. Available for the first time in English—and now published with new material—Ramos’s study not only offers an analysis of the complex relationships between history, literature, and nation-building in the modern Latin American context but also takes crucial steps toward the development of a truly comparative inter-American cultural criticism. With his focus on the nineteenth century, Ramos begins his genealogy of an emerging Latin Americanism with an examination of Argentinean Domingo Sarmiento and Chilean Andrés Bello, representing the “enlightened letrados” of tradition. In contrast to these “lettered men,” he turns to Cuban journalist, revolutionary, and poet José Martí, who, Ramos suggests, inaugurated a new kind of intellectual subject for the Americas. Though tracing Latin American modernity in general, it is the analysis of Martí—particularly his work in the United States—that becomes the focal point of Ramos’s study. Martí’s confrontation with the unequal modernization of the New World, the dependent status of Latin America, and the contrast between Latin America’s culture of elites and the northern mass culture of commodification are, for Ramos, key elements in understanding the complex Latin American experience of modernity. Including two new chapters written for this edition, as well as translations of three of Martí’s most important works, Divergent Modernities will be indispensable for anyone seeking to understand development and modernity across the Americas.

Imagined Globalization

Author: Néstor García Canclini
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822378892
Size: 38.83 MB
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A leading figure in cultural studies worldwide, Néstor García Canclini is a Latin American thinker who has consistently sought to understand the impact of globalization on the relations between Latin America, Europe, and the United States, and among Latin American countries. In this book, newly available in English, he considers how globalization is imagined by artists, academics, migrants, and entrepreneurs, all of whom traverse boundaries and, at times, engage in conflicted or negotiated multicultural interactions. García Canclini contrasts the imaginaries of previous migrants to the Americas with those who live in transnational circuits today. He integrates metaphor and narrative, working through philosophical, anthropological, and socioeconomically grounded interpretations of art, literature, crafts, media, and other forms of expression toward his conclusion that globalization is, in important ways, a collection of heterogeneous narratives. García Canclini advocates global imaginaries that generate new strategies for dealing with contingency and produce new forms of citizenship oriented toward multiple social configurations rather than homogenization. This edition of Imagined Globalization includes a significant new introduction by George Yúdice and an interview in which the cultural theorist Toby Miller and García Canclini touch on events including the Arab Spring and Occupy Wall Street.

Latin Americanism

Author: Román De la Campa
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9780816631179
Size: 33.26 MB
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In this timely book, Roman de la Campa asks to what degree the Latin America studied in U.S. academies is actually an entity "made in the U.S.A." He argues that there is an ever-increasing gap between the political, theoretical, and financial pressures affecting the U.S. academy and Latin America's own cultural, political, and literary practices. De la Campa focuses on the conduct of Latin American literary criticism in U.S. universities and compares this with the "Latin Americanism" of Latin America itself.

Postethnic America

Author: David A. Hollinger
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0786722282
Size: 62.21 MB
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First published in 1995, Postethnic America was widely hailed as a groundbreaking proposal for healing our nation's ethnic divisions. David A. Hollinger, one of America's foremost intellectual historians, argues for replacing the pluralist model of multiculturalism that is based on the idea of group rights with a cosmopolitan model that recognizes the reality of shifting group boundaries and multiple identities. Postethnic America is a bracing reminder of America's universalist promise, and a stirring call for a new form of nationalism. In this tenth-anniversary edition, Hollinger has added a new postscript in which he responds to his critics and addresses the contemporary conversation about race, ethnicity, inequality, and nationalism in America.

Scenes From Postmodern Life

Author: Beatriz Sarlo
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9780816630080
Size: 77.83 MB
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In this bracing book. Beatriz Sarlo offers a remarkably clear, forthright, and forceful statement of what precisely cultural criticism is and might be in our age of manic consumption, commercialization, popularization, and mass marketing.

Avant Garde Internationalism And Politics

Author: Andrea Giunta
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 082238969X
Size: 34.48 MB
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The 1960s were heady years in Argentina. Visual artists, curators, and critics sought to fuse art and politics; to broaden the definition of art to encompass happenings and assemblages; and, above all, to achieve international recognition for new, cutting-edge Argentine art. A bestseller in Argentina, Avant-Garde, Internationalism, and Politics is an examination of the 1960s as a brief historical moment when artists, institutions, and critics joined to promote an international identity for Argentina’s visual arts. The renowned Argentine art historian and critic Andrea Giunta analyzes projects specifically designed to internationalize Argentina’s art and avant-garde during the 1960s: the importation of exhibitions of contemporary international art, the sending of Argentine artists abroad to study, the organization of prize competitions involving prestigious international art critics, and the export of exhibitions of Argentine art to Europe and the United States. She looks at the conditions that made these projects possible—not least the Alliance for Progress, a U.S. program of “exchange” and “cooperation” meant to prevent the spread of communism through Latin America in the wake of the Cuban Revolution—as well as the strategies formulated to promote them. She describes the influence of Romero Brest, prominent art critic, supporter of abstract art, and director of the Centro de Artes Visuales del Instituto Tocuato Di Tella (an experimental art center in Buenos Aires); various group programs such as Nueva Figuración and Arte Destructivo; and individual artists including Antonio Berni, Alberto Greco, León Ferrari, Marta Minujin, and Luis Felipe Noé. Giunta’s rich narrative illuminates the contentious postwar relationships between art and politics, Latin America and the United States, and local identity and global recognition.