History Of Infectious Disease Pandemics In Urban Societies

Author: Mark D. Hardt
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739180274
Size: 54.33 MB
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This book examines the evolution of urban social patterns and infectious diseases. Tracing the historical record, it explores the human struggle to contain infectious disease and the adaption of microbes to these measures.

The Spanish Influenza Pandemic Of 1918 1919

Author: Maria Porras-Gallo
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
ISBN: 1580464963
Size: 45.26 MB
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Sheds new light on what the WHO described as "the single most devastating infectious disease outbreak ever recorded," focusing on social control, gender, class, religion, national identity, and military medicine's reactions to the pandemic.

Pandemics Science And Policy

Author: S. Abeysinghe
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137467207
Size: 62.40 MB
Format: PDF
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Pandemics, Science and Policy analyses the World Health Organisation's (WHO) management of the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic. Abeysinghe illustrates the ways in which the WHO's account was vulnerable to contestation, and ultimately how uncertain risks can affect policy and action on the global level.

Pandemic

Author: Sonia Shah
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0374122881
Size: 16.64 MB
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"From the author of The Fever, a wide-ranging inquiry into the origins of pandemics Interweaving history, original reportage, and personal narrative, Pandemic explores the origins of epidemics, drawing parallels between the story of cholera-one of history's most disruptive and deadly pathogens-and the new pathogens that stalk humankind today, from Ebola and avian influenza to drug-resistant superbugs. More than three hundred infectious diseases have emerged or reemerged in new territory during the past fifty years, and 90 percent of epidemiologists expect that one of them will cause a disruptive, deadly pandemic sometime in the next two generations. To reveal how that might happen, Sonia Shah tracks each stage of cholera's dramatic journey from harmless microbe to world-changing pandemic, from its 1817 emergence in the South Asian hinterlands to its rapid dispersal across the nineteenth-century world and its latest beachhead in Haiti. She reports on the pathogens following in cholera's footsteps, from the MRSA bacterium that besieges her own family to the never-before-seen killers emerging from China's wet markets, the surgical wards of New Delhi, the slums of Port-au-Prince, and the suburban backyards of the East Coast. By delving into the convoluted science, strange politics, and checkered history of one of the world's deadliest diseases, Pandemic reveals what the next epidemic might look like-and what we can do to prevent it"--

Man And Microbes

Author: Arno Karlen
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684822709
Size: 53.93 MB
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A noted medical historian places recent outbreaks of deadly diseases in historical perspective, with accounts of other alarming and recurring diseases throughout history and of the ways in which humans have adapted. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

Challenges In Infectious Diseases

Author: I.W. Fong
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461444969
Size: 61.91 MB
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This next volume in the series will provide up to date Information and discussion on future approach to control several challenging Infectious Disease worldwide. The past decade has been highlighted by numerous advances in research of medical scientific knowledge. medical technology and the biological and diagnostic techniques-but somewhat less dramatic changes or improvement in management of medical conditions. This volume will address some of the emerging issues, challenges, and controversies in Infectious Diseases.

Networked Disease

Author: S. Harris Ali
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444305029
Size: 14.26 MB
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A collection of writings by leading experts and newer researchers on the SARS outbreak and its relation to infectious disease management in progressively global and urban societies. Presents original contributions by scholars from seven countries on four continents Connects newer thinking on global cities, networks, and governance in a post-national era of public health regulations and neo-liberalization of state services Provides an important contribution to the global public debate on the challenges of emerging infectious disease in cities Examines the impact of globalization on future infectious disease threats on international and local politics and culture Focuses on the ways pathogens interact with economic, political and social factors, ultimately presenting a threat to human development and global cities Employs an interdisciplinary approach to the SARS epidemic, clearly demonstrating the value of social scientific perspectives on the study of modern disease in a globalized world

Research On Schools Neighborhoods And Communities

Author: William F. Tate
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442204680
Size: 20.62 MB
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This volume focuses on research and theoretical developments related to the role of geography in education, human development, and health. Multiple disciplinary perspectives provide the strengths and problems in our communities. Research in this presidential volume provides historical, moral, and scientifically based arguments to inform understandings of civic problems and possible solutions.

An Unnatural History Of Emerging Infections

Author: Ron Barrett
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191507156
Size: 78.30 MB
Format: PDF
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This book traces the social and environmental determinants of human infectious diseases from the Neolithic to the present day. Despite recent high profile discoveries of new pathogens, the major determinants of these emerging infections are ancient and recurring. These include changing modes of subsistence, shifting populations, environmental disruptions, and social inequalities. The recent labeling of the term "re-emerging infections" reflects a re-emergence, not so much of the diseases themselves, but rather a re-emerging awareness in affluent societies of long-standing problems that were previously ignored. An Unnatural History of Emerging Infections illustrates these recurring problems and determinants through an examination of three major epidemiological transitions. The First Transition occurred with the Agricultural Revolution beginning 10,000 years ago, bringing a rise in acute infections as the main cause of human mortality. The Second Transition first began with the Industrial Revolution; it saw a decline in infectious disease mortality and an increase in chronic diseases among wealthier nations, but less so in poorer societies. These culminated in today's "worst of both worlds syndrome" in which globalization has combined with the challenges of the First and Second Transitions to produce a Third Transition, characterized by a confluence of acute and chronic disease patterns within a single global disease ecology. This accessible text is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate level students and researchers in the fields of epidemiology, disease ecology, anthropology, health sciences, and the history of medicine. It will also be of relevance and use to undergraduate students interested in the history and social dynamics of infectious diseases.