Historic Grant Park

Author: Jennifer Goad Cuthbertson
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738587424
Size: 56.81 MB
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Both the neighborhood of Grant Park and the 131-acre park take their shared name from railroad executive Lemuel P. Grant. The park was a gift to the City of Atlanta from Grant and was designed by John Charles Olmsted, the stepson of Frederick Law Olmsted. It became an urban haven where people came to "take the waters" from its natural springs, canoe on Lake Abana, and stroll the winding pathways in the pastoral park. A neighborhood sprang up around this oasis and was filled with homes that were designed in the spirit of Victorian painted ladies, Craftsman bungalows, Queen Anne, and New South cottages. In 1979, the structures within the neighborhood and park were placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Grant Park

Author: Leonard Pitts, Jr.
Publisher: Agate Publishing
ISBN: 157284762X
Size: 45.76 MB
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"A novel as significant as it is engrossing." —Booklist, starred review Grant Park is a page-turning and provocative look at black and white relations in contemporary America, blending the absurd and the poignant in a powerfully well-crafted narrative that showcases Pitts's gift for telling emotionally wrenching stories. Grant Park begins in 1968, with Martin Luther King's final days in Memphis. The story then moves to the eve of the 2008 election, and cuts between the two eras. Disillusioned columnist Malcolm Toussaint, fueled by yet another report of unarmed black men killed by police, hacks into his newspaper's server to post an incendiary column that had been rejected by his editors. Toussaint then disappears, and his longtime editor, Bob Carson, is summarily fired within hours of the column's publication. While a furious Carson tries to find Toussaint—while simultaneously dealing with the reappearance of a lost love from his days as a 60s activist—Toussaint is abducted by two white supremacists plotting to explode a bomb at Barack Obama's planned rally in Chicago’s Grant Park. Toussaint and Carson are forced to remember the choices they made as young men, when both their lives were changed profoundly by their work in the civil rights movement.

City On The Verge

Author: Mark Pendergrast
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465094988
Size: 22.74 MB
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What we can learn from Atlanta's struggle to reinvent itself in the 21st Century Atlanta is on the verge of tremendous rebirth-or inexorable decline. A kind of Petri dish for cities struggling to reinvent themselves, Atlanta has the highest income inequality in the country, gridlocked highways, suburban sprawl, and a history of racial injustice. Yet it is also an energetic, brash young city that prides itself on pragmatic solutions. Today, the most promising catalyst for the city's rebirth is the BeltLine, which the New York Times described as "a staggeringly ambitious engine of urban revitalization." A long-term project that is cutting through forty-five neighborhoods ranging from affluent to impoverished, the BeltLine will complete a twenty-two-mile loop encircling downtown, transforming a massive ring of mostly defunct railways into a series of stunning parks connected by trails and streetcars. Acclaimed author Mark Pendergrast presents a deeply researched, multi-faceted, up-to-the-minute history of the biggest city in America's Southeast, using the BeltLine saga to explore issues of race, education, public health, transportation, business, philanthropy, urban planning, religion, politics, and community. An inspiring narrative of ordinary Americans taking charge of their local communities, City of the Verge provides a model for how cities across the country can reinvent themselves.

Grant Park

Author: Dennis H Cremin
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809332523
Size: 68.38 MB
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On November 4, 2008, when president-elect Barack Obama celebrated his victory with more than one hundred thousand supporters in Chicago, everyone knew where to meet. Long considered the showplace and cultural center of Chicago, Grant Park has been the site of tragedy and tension, as well success and joy. In addition to serving as the staging grounds for Abraham Lincoln’s funeral procession through the city, the park has been the setting for civil rights protests and the 1968 Democratic National Convention demonstrations. The faithful attended the open-air mass of Pope John Paul II in Grant Park, and fans gathered there to cheer for the Chicago Bulls after their championship wins. The long park overlooking the beautiful waters of Lake Michigan has played an active part in Chicago and U. S. history. In 1836, only three years after Chicago was founded, Chicagoans set aside the first narrow shoreline as public ground and declared it “forever open, clear, and free. . . .” Chicago historian and author Dennis H. Cremin reveals that despite such intent, the transformation of Grant Park to the spectacular park it is more than 175 years later was a gradual process, at first fraught with a lack of funding and organization, and later challenged by erosion, the railroads, automobiles, and a continued battle between original intent and conceptions of progress. Throughout the book, Cremin shows that while Grant Park’s landscape and uses have changed throughout its rocky history, the public ground continues to serve “as a display case for the city and a calling card to visitors.” Amply illustrated with maps and images from throughout Chicago’s history, Grant Park shows readers how Chicago’s “front yard” developed into one of the finest urban parks in the country today. 2014 Illinois State Historical Society Book of the Year

Landscapes For The People

Author: Ren Davis
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820348414
Size: 25.92 MB
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George Alexander Grant is an unknown elder in the field of American landscape photography. Just as they did the work of his contemporaries Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Eliot Porter, and others, millions of people viewed Grant’s photographs; unlike those contemporaries, few even knew Grant’s name. Landscapes for the People shares his story through his remarkable images and a compelling biography profiling patience, perseverance, dedication, and an unsurpassed love of the natural and historic places that Americans chose to preserve. A Pennsylvania native, Grant was introduced to the parks during the summer of 1922 and resolved to make parks work and photography his life. Seven years later, he received his dream job and spent the next quarter century visiting the four corners of the country to produce images in more than one hundred national parks, monuments, historic sites, battlefields, and other locations. He was there to visually document the dramatic expansion of the National Park Service during the New Deal, including the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Grant’s images are the work of a master craftsman. His practiced eye for composition and exposure and his patience to capture subjects in their finest light are comparable to those of his more widely known contemporaries. Nearly fifty years after his death, and in concert with the 2016 centennial of the National Park Service, it is fitting that George Grant’s photography be introduced to a new generation of Americans.

Columbus Georgia

Author: Judith Grant
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738542874
Size: 33.78 MB
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The rich African-American heritage of Columbus, Georgia, comes alive in this engaging collection of images and stories. From the town's early days when pioneers settled along the Chattahoochee River to its present status as a thriving metropolitan community, Columbus boasts an eventful history, one that would not be complete without the hard work and extraordinary achievements of its African-American community. Within these pages, the reader will discover such legendary figures as Eugene Bullard, the first black Aviator; Dr. Thomas Brewer, a champion of the Civil Rights movement; and Alma Thomas, a celebrated and accomplished visual artist.

Historic Sites And Landmarks That Shaped America From Acoma Pueblo To Ground Zero 2 Volumes

Author: Mitchell Newton-Matza
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610697502
Size: 74.60 MB
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Exploring the significance of places that built our cultural past, this guide is a lens into historical sites spanning the entire history of the United States, from Acoma Pueblo to Ground Zero. • Covers locations across the entire United States • Includes photographs, illustrations, and sidebars • Serves as both an educational and research tool

Suncook Village

Author: Carol A. Martel
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738557526
Size: 60.21 MB
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Located within the boundaries of the towns of Allenstown and Pembroke, Suncook, first granted as a township in 1728, has developed a rich history all its own. Railroad transportation was instrumental to the establishment and growth of three large textile mills. The first railroad system, the Concord and Portsmouth line, began in 1852. A second line, the Suncook Valley Railroad, followed in 1869. Drawn by advertisements in Canadian newspapers, French Canadian workers began migrating from Quebec in large numbers. By the late 1800s, Suncook had become known as "le Petit Canada." The power of the Suncook and Merrimack Rivers, scenic beauty in the area, and the connectivity brought through transportation helped transform a small industrial village into a vibrant and lasting community.

Historic Oakland Cemetery

Author: Tevi Taliaferro
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439612110
Size: 23.59 MB
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To learn about a community’s past, the city cemetery is the place to visit. As Atlanta’s oldest permanent landmark, Oakland Cemetery holds the past, present, and future history of the Gateway to the South. Established in 1850 as a small municipal cemetery on the southeastern edge of town, Historic Oakland has evolved into 88 acres of art, history, architecture, gardens, and peaceful green space in the heart of downtown Atlanta. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976 as a significant example of an historic Victorian-era cemetery, Oakland is the final resting place of more than 70,000 deceased. People of both statewide and national importance have been buried throughout the cemetery’s grounds in the past 150 years, including author Margaret Mitchell, golfing legend Bobby Jones, Confederate generals and soldiers, Georgia governors, Atlanta mayors, and ordinary people known only to their families. Historic Oakland Cemetery explores the history of both the cemetery and the people who were laid to rest there. From the famous to the infamous, the legendary to the ordinary, every person buried in the cemetery has a story to tell. For all of its emphasis on the past, Oakland remains an active cemetery, a public park, and an educational resource in which to study lush landscapes and Georgia history.

Lives And Times

Author: Blaine Terry Browne
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742561946
Size: 29.37 MB
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Lives and Times is a biographical reader designed to acquaint students with major issues in American history through the lives of individuals, prominent and otherwise, whose activities and ideas were crucial in shaping the course of the nation's history. Employing a narrative style, each volume consists of thirteen chapters in which the lives of two individuals are examined in the broader context of major historical themes. Readers will find not only a diversity of individuals profiled, but also themes spanning political, economic, social, cultural, intellectual and military history. This combined biographical/thematic approach provides the reader with more extensive biographical information and a fuller examination of key issues than is commonly offered in core texts. Each chapter also offers study questions and a bibliography. Also Available: Lives and Times: Individuals and Issues in American History: To 1877 by Blaine T. Browne and Robert C. Cottrell"