Hillary Clinton In The News

Author: Shawn J. Parry-Giles
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252096045
Size: 44.62 MB
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The charge of inauthenticity has trailed Hillary Clinton from the moment she entered the national spotlight and stood in front of television cameras. Hillary Clinton in the News: Gender and Authenticity in American Politics shows how the U.S. news media created their own news frames of Clinton's political authenticity and image-making, from her participation in Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign through her own 2008 presidential bid. Using theories of nationalism, feminism, and authenticity, Parry-Giles tracks the evolving ways the major networks and cable news programs framed Clinton's image as she assumed roles ranging from surrogate campaigner, legislative advocate, and financial investor to international emissary, scorned wife, and political candidate. This study magnifies how the coverage that preceded Clinton's entry into electoral politics was grounded in her earliest presence in the national spotlight, and in long-standing nationalistic beliefs about the boundaries of authentic womanhood and first lady comportment. Once Clinton dared to cross those gender boundaries and vie for office in her own right, the news exuded a rhetoric of sexual violence. These portrayals served as a warning to other women who dared to enter the political arena and violate the protocols of authentic womanhood.

Hillary Clinton In The News

Author: Shawn J. Parry-Giles
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780252079788
Size: 32.97 MB
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"The charge of inauthenticity has dogged Hillary Clinton from the moment she entered the national spotlight. Shawn J. Parry-Giles examines questions about the authenticity and political image-making of the the former first lady-turned-senator-turned presidential candidate and the media's representation of her as one of "the most loved and hated presidential wives in American history." Parry-Giles tracks Clinton as she assumed an array of roles from surrogate campaigner, legislative advocate, and financial investor to international emissary, scorned wife, and political candidate. After the 1992 campaign, the health care debate, and the Whitewater controversy, a familiar news framing developed, which disparaged Clinton for her outspoken, overly visible political presence. In this backlash, news frames stressed her transgressions in overstepping the boundaries of authentic womanhood and first lady comportment. During the Lewinsky scandal, the victimhood frame furthered her characterization as a scorned woman admonished to the private sphere as wife and mother. Parry-Giles' longitudinal study magnifies how the coverage that preceded Clinton's entry into electoral politics was grounded in her earliest presence in the national spotlight. Most disturbingly, once Clinton vied for office in her right, the news exuded a rhetoric of sexual violence, motivated by portrayals of her as an inauthentic political woman acting outside the confines of her gender. While Clinton's defiance was awe-inspiring and precedent setting, the magnitude of the disciplining and harsh rhetoric that she faced served as a warning to other women who dared to enter the political arena and violate the protocols of authentic womanhood"--

Woman President

Author: Kristina Horn Sheeler
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603449833
Size: 71.17 MB
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What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining—and thus, the electing—of a woman as president? Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women. Pundits have been predicting women’s political ascendency for years. And yet, although the 2008 presidential campaign featured Hillary Clinton as an early frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination and Sarah Palin as the first female Republican vice-presidential nominee, no woman has yet held either of the top two offices. The reasons for this are complex and varied, but the authors assert that the question certainly encompasses more than the shortcomings of women candidates or the demands of the particular political moment. Instead, the authors identify a pernicious backlash against women presidential candidates—one that is expressed in both political and popular culture. In Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture, Kristina Horn Sheeler and Karrin Vasby Anderson provide a discussion of US presidentiality as a unique rhetorical role. Within that framework, they review women’s historical and contemporary presidential bids, placing special emphasis on the 2008 campaign. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody.

The Destruction Of Hillary Clinton

Author: Susan Bordo
Publisher: Melville House
ISBN: 1612196632
Size: 72.14 MB
Format: PDF
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In a mere few months during the 2016 presidential campaign, the accomplished and poised former Senator and Secretary of State was turned into something unrecognizable. Hillary was 'flawed.' 'Historically unpopular.' 'Untrustworthy.' Not 'available' enough to the media or 'the people.' We heard it - and more - from our neighbours overseas, on social media, in our offices and our houses. What happened? In a week-by-week narrative of the campaign year - from the primaries through election day - Bordo deconstructs the various forces that contributed to Hillary Clinton's political destruction.

Watching Women S Liberation 1970

Author: Bonnie J. Dow
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252096487
Size: 30.72 MB
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In 1970, ABC, CBS, and NBC--the “Big Three” of the pre-cable television era--discovered the feminist movement. From the famed sit-in at Ladies’ Home Journal to multi-part feature stories on the movement's ideas and leaders, nightly news broadcasts covered feminism more than in any year before or since, bringing women's liberation into American homes. In Watching Women's Liberation, 1970: Feminism's Pivotal Year on the Network News, Bonnie J. Dow uses case studies of key media events to delve into the ways national TV news mediated the emergence of feminism's second wave. First legitimized as a big story by print media, the feminist movement gained broadcast attention as the networks’ eagerness to get in on the action was accompanied by feminists’ efforts to use national media for their own purposes. Dow chronicles the conditions that precipitated feminism's new visibility and analyzes the verbal and visual strategies of broadcast news discourses that tried to make sense of the movement. Groundbreaking and packed with detail, Watching Women's Liberation, 1970 shows how feminism went mainstream--and what it gained and lost on the way.

The Prime Time Presidency

Author: Shawn J. Parry-Giles
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252092090
Size: 47.92 MB
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Contrasting strong women and multiculturalism with portrayals of a heroic white male leading the nation into battle, The Prime-Time Presidency explores the NBC drama The West Wing, paying particular attention to its role in promoting cultural meaning about the presidency and U.S. nationalism. Based in a careful, detailed analysis of the "first term" of The West Wing's President Josiah Bartlet, this criticism highlights the ways the text negotiates powerful tensions and complex ambiguities at the base of U.S. national identity--particularly the role of gender, race, and militarism in the construction of U.S. nationalism. Unlike scattered and disparate collections of essays, Trevor Parry-Giles and Shawn J. Parry-Giles offer a sustained, ideologically driven criticism of The West Wing. The Prime-time Presidency presents a detailed critique of the program rooted in presidential history, an appreciation of television's power as a source of political meaning, and television's contribution to the articulation of U.S. national identity.

Notes From The Cracked Ceiling

Author: Anne E. Kornblut
Publisher: Crown Pub
ISBN: 0307464253
Size: 64.86 MB
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Looks at the obstacles faced by women who aspire to run for president, looks at the mistakes made by women candidates in their quest for the presidency, and offers strategies to help them succeed.

Cancer Activism

Author: Karen M. Kedrowski
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252031989
Size: 64.96 MB
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The first comparison of the breast cancer and the prostate cancer movements Cancer Activism explores the interplay between advocacy, the media, and public perception through an analysis of breast cancer and prostate cancer activist groups over a nearly twenty-year period. Despite both diseases having nearly identical mortality and morbidity rates, Karen M. Kedrowski and Marilyn Stine Sarow present evidence from more than 4,200 news articles to show that the different groups have had markedly different impacts. They trace the rise of each movement from its beginning and explore how discussions about the diseases appeared on media, public, and government agendas. In an important exception to the feminist tenet that women as a group hold less power than men, Kedrowski and Sarow demonstrate that the breast cancer movement is not only larger and better organized than the prostate cancer movement, it is also far more successful at shaping media coverage, public opinion, and government policy.

Thirty Ways Of Looking At Hillary

Author: Susan Morrison
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061455938
Size: 11.36 MB
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An evaluation of Hillary Clinton by thirty women writers considers her political career and prospects from supportive and less favorable perspectives, in a volume that includes contributions by such names as Deborah Tannen, Susan Cheever, and Lorrie Moore

Women For President

Author: Erika Falk
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252076915
Size: 24.16 MB
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Newly updated to examine Hillary Clinton's formidable 2008 presidential campaign, Women for President analyzes the gender bias the media has demonstrated in covering women candidates since the first woman ran for America's highest office in 1872. Tracing the campaigns of nine women who ran for president through 2008--Victoria Woodhull, Belva Lockwood, Margaret Chase Smith, Shirley Chisholm, Patricia Schroeder, Lenora Fulani, Elizabeth Dole, Carol Moseley Braun, and Hillary Clinton--Erika Falk finds little progress in the fair treatment of women candidates. The press portrays female candidates as unviable, unnatural, and incompetent, and often ignores or belittles women instead of reporting their ideas and intent. This thorough comparison of men's and women's campaigns reveals a worrisome trend of sexism in press coverage--a trend that still persists today.