Growing Up Muslim

Author: Andrew Garrod
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801452529
Size: 74.96 MB
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"While 9/11 and its aftermath created a traumatic turning point for most of the writers in this book, it is telling that none of their essays begin with that moment. These young people were living, probing, and shifting their Muslim identities long before 9/11. . . . I've heard it said that the second generation never asks the first about its story, but nearly all the essays in this book include long, intimate portrayals of Muslim family life, often going back generations. These young Muslims are constantly negotiating the differences between families for whom faith and culture were matters of honor and North America's youth culture, with its emphasis on questioning, exploring, and inventing one’s own destiny."—from the Introduction by Eboo Patel InGrowing Up Muslim, Andrew Garrod and Robert Kilkenny present fourteen personal essays by college students of the Muslim faith who are themselves immigrants or are the children of immigrants to the United States. In their essays, the students grapple with matters of ethnicity, religious prejudice and misunderstanding, and what is termed Islamophobia. The fact of 9/11 and subsequent surveillance and suspicion of Islamic Americans (particularly those hailing from the Middle East and the Asian Subcontinent) have had a profound effect on these students, their families, and their communities of origin.

Balancing Two Worlds

Author: Andrew Garrod
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801473845
Size: 46.69 MB
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"Those who find themselves living in the Americas, no matter what their ethnic, educational, or economic background, must ultimately 'become their own personalities,' melding their point of view with their points of origin and their places of settlement. For immigrant or refugee families and their children, this 'process of becoming' often means struggling with the contradictions of race, generation, economics, class, work, religion, gender, and sexuality within the family, workplace, or school. . . . Perhaps nowhere is the struggle more raw, poignant, and moving than in the words of the younger generation at the cusp of such becoming. We readers can also find insights within the candid accounts of their personal lives and in the experiences of their family and friends."—from Balancing Two WorldsBalancing Two Worlds highlights themes surrounding the creation of Asian American identity. This book contains fourteen first-person narratives by Asian American college students, most of whom have graduated during the first five years of the twenty-first century. Their engaging accounts detail the students' very personal struggles with issues of assimilation, gender, religion, sexuality, family conflicts, educational stereotypes, and being labeled the "model minority." Some of the students relate stories drawn from their childhood and adolescent experiences, while others focus more on their college experiences at Dartmouth. Anyone who wants to learn about the changing concept of race in America and what it's like to be a young American of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Burmese, or South Asian descent—from educators and college administrators to students and their families—will find Balancing Two Worlds a compelling read and a valuable resource.

Mi Voz Mi Vida

Author: Andrew Garrod
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801473869
Size: 37.59 MB
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Amid the flurry of debates about immigration, poverty, and education in the United States, the stories in Mi Voz, Mi Vida allow us to reflect on how young people who might be most affected by the results of these debates actually navigate through American society. The fifteen Latino college students who tell their stories in this book come from a variety of socioeconomic, regional, and family backgrounds-they are young men and women of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American, and South American descent. Their insights are both balanced and frank, blending personal, anecdotal, political, and cultural viewpoints. Their engaging stories detail the students' personal struggles with issues such as identity and biculturalism, family dynamics, religion, poverty, stereotypes, and the value of education. Throughout, they provide insights into issues of racial identity in contemporary America among a minority population that is very much in the news. This book gives educators, students, and their families a clear view of the experience of Latino students adapting to a challenging educational environment and a cultural context-Dartmouth College-often very different from their childhood ones.

First Person First Peoples

Author: Colleen Larimore
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801484148
Size: 41.39 MB
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Relates the Dartmouth graduates' struggle to reconcile their college experiences with their ethnic heritage

I Am Where I Come From

Author: Andrew Garrod
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781501706929
Size: 73.33 MB
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I Am Where I Come From presents the autobiographies of thirteen Native American undergraduates and graduates of Dartmouth College, ten of them current and recent students.

Adolescent Portraits

Author: Andrew Garrod
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
ISBN: 9780205502042
Size: 65.15 MB
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Contemporary cases in development Adolescent Portraits illustrates the contemporary theories and research that surround adolescent development today. The book is a compelling anthology of first-person accounts written by college students. The real-life cases included in the text represent a fascinating, diverse cross-section of contemporary adolescence and cover a variety of issues, including family and peer relationships, eating disorders, self image, illness, and disabilities. Teaching & Learning Experience Personalize Learning - The new MySearchLab with eText delivers proven results in helping students succeed and provides engaging experiences that personalize learning. Apply Developmental Science and Engage Students - Interactive online resources supplement case studies in the text to produce a meaningful learning experience for students. Improve Critical Thinking - First-person cases enable students to connect research to practice. Explore Research - New cases have been added to reflect the most recent theories and research in the field. Understand Culture and Diversity - A multicultural approach makes this book both unique and relevant to a diverse undergraduate population. Support Instructors - MyTest, PowerPoints, and an instructor's manual offer additional support for instructors. Note: MySearchLab with eText does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MySearchLab with eText, please visit: www.mysearchlab.com or you can purchase a valuepack of the text + MySearchLab with eText (at no additional cost). VP: 020522282X / 9780205222827

Mixed

Author: Andrew Garrod
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801469155
Size: 30.82 MB
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Mixed presents engaging and incisive first-person experiences of what it is like to be multiracial in what is supposedly a postracial world. Bringing together twelve essays by college students who identify themselves as multiracial, this book considers what this identity means in a reality that occasionally resembles the post-racial dream of some and at other times recalls a familiar world of racial and ethnic prejudice. Exploring a wide range of concerns and anxieties, aspirations and ambitions, these young writers, who all attended Dartmouth College, come from a variety of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Unlike individuals who define themselves as having one racial identity, these students have lived the complexity of their identity from a very young age. In Mixed, a book that will benefit educators, students, and their families, they eloquently and often passionately reveal how they experience their multiracial identity, how their parents' race or ethnicity shaped their childhoods, and how perceptions of their race have affected their relationships.

Crossing Customs

Author: Andrew Garrod
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780815333951
Size: 50.71 MB
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First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Muslim Identity Formation In Religiously Diverse Societies

Author: Derya Iner
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 144388572X
Size: 37.97 MB
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This book centres on the key concept of diversity and relates it to the identity formation of Muslims. Muslim identity differs specifically within certain theological, social, political and regional circumstances and discourses. Considering the diversity of societies and the numerous factors contributing to the shaping of Muslim identity, this book brings together examples from different parts of the world, including Western societies, and each chapter focuses on separate determinants of individual, communal, political, institutional, civic and national Muslim identities, offering a blueprint for identity studies. A particular strength of the book is its detailed investigation of the complexity of identity formation and the heterogeneity of the Muslim experience. In addition to including a variety of themes and cases from different parts of the world, diverse methodologies, including quantitative and qualitative research methods, further enrich the book. The contributors’ academic backgrounds and organic relationships with their communities enable them to develop their arguments with insight. Furthermore, by giving voice to academics from different nationalities, this book reflects neither a predominantly Western nor a distinctly Eastern approach, but instead gives a balanced view from critical academia globally.

The 9 11 Generation

Author: Sunaina Marr Maira
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479817694
Size: 64.15 MB
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Since the attacks of 9/11, the banner of national security has led to intense monitoring of the politics of Muslim and Arab Americans. Young people from these communities have come of age in a time when the question of political engagement is both urgent and fraught. In The 9/11 Generation, Sunaina Marr Maira uses extensive ethnography to understand the meaning of political subjecthood and mobilization for Arab, South Asian, and Afghan American youth. Maira explores how young people from communities targeted in the War on Terror engage with the “political,” forging coalitions based on new racial and ethnic categories, even while they are under constant scrutiny and surveillance, and organizing around notions of civil rights and human rights. The 9/11 Generation explores the possibilities and pitfalls of rights-based organizing at a moment when the vocabulary of rights and democracy has been used to justify imperial interventions, such as the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Maira further reconsiders political solidarity in cross-racial and interfaith alliances at a time when U.S. nationalism is understood as not just multicultural but also post-racial. Throughout, she weaves stories of post-9/11 youth activism through key debates about neoliberal democracy, the “radicalization” of Muslim youth, gender, and humanitarianism.