Groundwork

Author: Genna Rae McNeil
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812200836
Size: 15.61 MB
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"A classic. . . . [It] will make an extraordinary contribution to the improvement of race relations and the understanding of race and the American legal process."—Judge A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., from the Foreword Charles Hamilton Houston (1895-1950) left an indelible mark on American law and society. A brilliant lawyer and educator, he laid much of the legal foundation for the landmark civil rights decisions of the 1950s and 1960s. Many of the lawyers who won the greatest advances for civil rights in the courts, Justice Thurgood Marshall among them, were trained by Houston in his capacity as dean of the Howard University Law School. Politically Houston realized that blacks needed to develop their racial identity and also to recognize the class dimension inherent in their struggle for full civil rights as Americans. Genna Rae McNeil is thorough and passionate in her treatment of Houston, evoking a rich family tradition as well as the courage, genius, and tenacity of a man largely responsible for the acts of "simple justice" that changed the course of American life.

Groundwork

Author: Genna Rae McNeil
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780812278781
Size: 36.42 MB
Format: PDF
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Root And Branch

Author: Rawn James, Jr.
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 9781608191680
Size: 11.21 MB
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Although widely viewed as the beginning of the legal struggle to end segregation, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision Brown v. Board of Education was in fact the culmination of decades of legal challenges led by a band of lawyers intent on dismantling segregation one statute at a time. Root and Branch is the compelling story of the fiercely committed laywers that constructed the legal foundation for what we now call the civil rights movement. Charles Hamilton Houston laid the groundwork, reinventing the law school at Howard University (where he taught a young, brash Thurgood Marshall) and becoming special counsel to the NAACP. Later Houston and Marshall traveled through the hostile South, looking for cases with which to dismantle America's long-systematized racism, often at great personal risk. The abstemious, buttoned-down Houston and the folksy, easygoing Marshall made an unlikely pair-but their accomplishments in bringing down Jim Crow made an unforgettable impact on U.S. legal history.

Land Reform In Japan

Author: Ronald Dore
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1780939655
Size: 31.15 MB
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The land reform carried out in Japan during the period of American Occupation is often spoken of as one of the most successful of the post-war reforms. It was certainly one of the most thorough going redistributions of land which the world has seen. A third of the total area of arable land changed hands, and nearly a third of the total population of the country was affected. Socially, the land reform accelerated the decay in feudal institutions, rendering the lot of the Japanese farmer considerably better than it once was. First published in 1984, this title is part of the Bloomsbury Academic Collections series.

Undoing Plessy

Author: Gordon Andrews
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 144385929X
Size: 32.23 MB
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Undoing Plessy: Charles Hamilton Houston, Race, Labor and the Law, 1895–1950 explores the manner in which African Americans countered racialized impediments, attacking their legal underpinnings during the first half of the twentieth century. Specifically, Undoing Plessy explores the professional life of Charles Hamilton Houston, and the way it informs our understanding of change in the pre-Brown era. Houston dedicated his life to the emancipation of oppressed people, and was inspired early-on to choose the law as a tool to become, in his own words, a “social engineer.” Further, Houston’s life provides a unique lens through which one may more accurately view the threads of race, labor, and the law as they are woven throughout American society. Houston understood the difficulties facing black workers in America, and, by marshaling his considerable skills as an attorney and leader, was able to construct a strategy that fought for full integration by changing the laws of the United States at the highest level. With unparalleled success, Houston developed a three-pronged strategy from 1925–1950 that focused on the courts, the workplace, and politics, securing the expansion of labor rights and civil rights for African Americans. Better than most, Charles Houston understood that the right to work was inherently necessary to achieve real, not just perceived, freedom. To that end, Undoing Plessy situates Houston’s life within the contested cultural and political realities of his time, expanding our understanding of what it meant to work and be free in America during the first half of the twentieth century. In particular, these gains were achieved in areas significant to workers, including education, the workplace, access to unions, housing, and equality before the law at the local, state, and federal levels. To understand Charles Houston’s contributions on behalf of those who labored in the black community, and more broadly in American society, his life is contextualized within the long Civil Rights Movement. Houston’s work was intimately connected with many profound efforts to liberate those who were oppressed. Undoing Plessy examines his strategies and accomplishments, helping us to further understand the complexities of change in the pre-Brown Era, and offers us compelling insights into dilemmas currently facing those in the workplace.

Young Thurgood

Author: Larry S. Gibson
Publisher: Prometheus Books
ISBN: 1616145722
Size: 67.25 MB
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Thurgood Marshall was the most important American lawyer of the twentieth century. He transformed the nation's legal landscape by challenging the racial segregation that had relegated millions to second-class citizenship. He won twenty-nine of thirty-three cases before the United States Supreme Court, was a federal appeals court judge, served as the US solicitor general, and, for twenty-four years, sat on the Supreme Court. Marshall is best known for achievements after he relocated to New York in 1936 to work for the NAACP. But Marshall's personality, attitudes, priorities, and work habits had crystallized during earlier years in Maryland. This work is the first close examination of the formative period in Marshall's life. As the authorn shows, Thurgood Marshall was a fascinating man of contrasts. He fought for racial justice without becoming a racist. Simultaneously idealistic and pragmatic, Marshall was a passionate advocate, yet he maintained friendly relationships with his opponents. Young Thurgood reveals how Marshall's distinctive traits were molded by events, people, and circumstances early in his life. Professor Gibson presents fresh information about Marshall's family, youth, and education. He describes Marshall's key mentors, the special impact of his high school and college competitive debating, his struggles to establish a law practice during the Great Depression, and his first civil rights cases. The author sheds new light on the NAACP and its first lawsuits in the campaign that led to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education school desegregation decision. He also corrects some of the often-repeated stories about Marshall that are inaccurate. The only biography of Thurgood Marshall to be endorsed by Marshall’s immediate family, Young Thurgood is an exhaustively researched and engagingly written work that everyone interested in law, civil rights, American history, and biography will want to read. From the Hardcover edition.

Emancipation

Author: J. Clay Smith, Jr
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812216851
Size: 16.39 MB
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Winner of the W. E. B. Du Bois Book Award of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists "Emancipation is an important and impressive work; one cannot read it without being inspired by the legal acumen, creativity, and resiliency these pioneer lawyers displayed. . . . It should be read by everyone interested in understanding the road African-Americans have traveled and the challenges that lie ahead."—From the Foreword, by Justice Thurgood Marshall

A Philip Randolph And The Struggle For Civil Rights

Author: Cornelius L. Bynum
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252035755
Size: 26.24 MB
Format: PDF
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Although somewhat overshadowed by giants such as W.E.B. Dubois and Martin Luther King, A. Philip Randolph is one of the most important figures in the Black struggle for civil and human rights during the 20th century. In this excellent book, Bynum (history, Purdue U.) looks at Randolph's role in the trade union and Civil Rights movements, showing how his work in organizing for and leading the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters--the country's first all-Black union--laid crucial groundwork for the victories of social justice movements later in the century. The author argues that Randolph's advocacy of direct mass action, nonviolent civil disobedience, and coalitions between Black and white workers helped shape the "toolkit" used so effectively by the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. As much an intellectual history as it is a biography, Bynum's book is an important addition to the scholarship on a critical figure in Black American history. Annotation ♭2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com).

Thurgood Marshall

Author: Charles L. Zelden
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113617494X
Size: 61.18 MB
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Thurgood Marshall was an Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1967 to 1991. He was the first African American to hold that position, and was one of the most influential legal actors of his time. Before being appointed to the Supreme Court by President Lyndon Johnson, Marshall was a lawyer for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Federal Judge (1961-1965), and Solicitor General of the United States (1965-1966). Marshall won twenty-nine of thirty-two cases before the Supreme Court – most notably the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education, which held segregated public schools unconstitutional. Marshall spent his career fighting racial segregation and legal inequality, and his time on the court establishing a record for supporting the "voiceless American." He left a legacy of change that still affects American society today. Through this concise biography, accompanied by primary sources that present Marshall in his own words, students will learn what Marshall did (and did not do) during his life, why those actions were important, and what effects his efforts had on the larger course of American history.

Charles H Houston

Author: James L. Conyers
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739143581
Size: 64.59 MB
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"This edited collection focuses on the philosophical ideas, constructive engagement, and lasting contributions of Charles H. Houston, a legal scholar activist who played an important role in the civil rights movement"--