Gerry Spence

Author: Gerry Spence
Publisher: Doubleday Books
ISBN:
Size: 13.59 MB
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The defense attorney who won the $10.5 million settlement in the Karen Silkwood case and a record libel judgement against "Penthouse" magazine recalls his famous trials and discusses his views on the American justice system

O J The Last Word

Author: Gerry Spence
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0312195192
Size: 64.39 MB
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The best-selling, no-holds-barred classic every lawyer, everyone involved in the media, & anyone interested in criminology must read if the failing justice system is to be saved.

With Justice For None

Author: Gerry Spence
Publisher: Crown
ISBN:
Size: 62.40 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"A scathing indictment of how law is taught, practiced, and administered in this country....One of the best books ever written on the law."-Denver Post.

The Making Of A Country Lawyer

Author: Gerry Spence
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312169145
Size: 73.90 MB
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A lawyer who became famous while defending Karen Silkwood and Randy Weaver shares details on both his cases and his life, including its turning point at age twenty, when he got the news his mother had committed suicide. Reprint.

Of Murder And Madness

Author: Gerry Spence
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312956875
Size: 71.71 MB
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In an informative study of the insanity defense that focuses on the murder trial and acquittal of Joe Esquibel, the noted lawyer explains why the insanity plea is crucial in the American justice system

The Lost Frontier

Author: Gerry Spence
Publisher: Gibbs Smith
ISBN: 1423632915
Size: 78.22 MB
Format: PDF
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A visual autobiography and portfolio of one of the West’s famous trial attorneys. The Lost Frontier features a generous and dazzling collection of the author’s own paintings and photographs, vividly embellishing his story of growing up in the Depression and his evolution as an attorney and advocate for the disenfranchised. Most importantly, it uniquely documents his life in and relationship with his beloved state of Wyoming. With an unabashedly iconoclastic view of how things are and how they should be, these images and words could only have been created by Gerry Spence. Gerry Spence is a well-known trial attorney who has tried and won many nationally known cases, including the Karen Silkwood case and the defense of Imelda Marcos. He also founded the Trial Lawyers College, which established a revolutionary method for training lawyers for the people. He is the author of sixteen books, including the best-seller How to Argue and Win Every Time, and has been a frequent commentator on television, including serving as legal consultant for NBC covering the O. J. Simpson trial. He lives in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, with his wife of forty years, Imaging.

Half Moon And Empty Stars

Author: Gerry Spence
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743202767
Size: 43.62 MB
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From the author of bestselling "How to Argue and Win Every Time" comes a new classic about two Native American brothers torn apart--a legal thriller, a love story, and a visionary work that examines deeply the values of life and death.

Trial By Fire

Author: Gerry Spence
Publisher: Harper Perennial
ISBN: 9780688148386
Size: 54.46 MB
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Police State

Author: Gerry Spence
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1466885203
Size: 61.65 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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How does America, founded on the promise of freedom for all, find itself poised to become a police state? In Police State, legendary "country lawyer" Gerry Spence reveals the unnerving truth of our criminal justice system. In his more than sixty years in the courtroom, Spence has never represented a person charged with a crime in which the police hadn't themselves violated the law. Whether by hiding, tampering with, or manufacturing evidence; by gratuitous violence and even murder, those who are charged with upholding the law too often break it. Spence points to the explosion of brutality leading up to the murder of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, insisting that this is the way it has always been: cops get away with murder. Nothing changes. Police State narrates the shocking account of the Madrid train bombings -how the FBI accused an innocent man of treasonous acts they knew he hadn't committed. It details the rampant racism within Chicago's police department, which landed teenager Dennis Williams on death row. It unveils the deliberately coercive efforts of two cops to extract a false murder confession from frightened and mentally fragile Albert Hancock, along with other appalling evidence from eight of Spence's most famous cases. We all want to feel safe. But how can we be safe when the very police we pay to protect us instead kill us, maim us, and falsify evidence against us. Can we accept the argument that cops may occasionally overstep their boundaries, but only when handling guilty criminals and never with us? Can we expect them to investigate and prosecute themselves when faced with allegations of misconduct? Can we believe that they are acting for our own good? Too many innocent are convicted; too many are wrongly executed. The cost has become too high for a free people to bear. In Police State, Spence issues a stinging indictment of the American justice system. Demonstrating that the way we select and train our police guarantees fatal abuses of justice, he also prescribes a challenging cure that stands to restore America's promise of liberty and justice for all.