Forced Migration And Global Politics

Author: Alexander Betts
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444315875
Size: 13.29 MB
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Using real-world examples and in-depth case studies, Forced Migration and Global Politics systematically applies International Relations theory to explore the international politics of forced migration. Provides an accessible and thought-provoking introduction to the main debates and concepts in international relations and examines their relevance for understanding forced migration Utilizes a wide-range of real-world examples and in-depth case studies, including the harmonization of EU asylum and immigration policy and the securitization of asylum since 9/11 Explores the relevance of cutting-edge debates in international relations to forced migration

Forced Migration And Global Politics

Author: Alexander Betts
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 1444315870
Size: 63.71 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6914
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Using real-world examples and in-depth case studies, Forced Migration and Global Politics systematically applies International Relations theory to explore the international politics of forced migration. Provides an accessible and thought-provoking introduction to the main debates and concepts in international relations and examines their relevance for understanding forced migration Utilizes a wide-range of real-world examples and in-depth case studies, including the harmonization of EU asylum and immigration policy and the securitization of asylum since 9/11 Explores the relevance of cutting-edge debates in international relations to forced migration

Forced Migration And Global Politics

Author: Alexander Betts
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9781405180320
Size: 38.88 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7416
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Using real-world examples and in-depth case studies, Forced Migration and Global Politics systematically applies International Relations theory to explore the international politics of forced migration. Provides an accessible and thought-provoking introduction to the main debates and concepts in international relations and examines their relevance for understanding forced migration Utilizes a wide-range of real-world examples and in-depth case studies, including the harmonization of EU asylum and immigration policy and the securitization of asylum since 9/11 Explores the relevance of cutting-edge debates in international relations to forced migration

Refugees In International Relations

Author: Alexander Betts
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019958074X
Size: 12.79 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Refugees lie at the heart of world politics. The causes and consequences of, and responses to, human displacement are intertwined with many of the core concerns of International Relations. Yet, scholars of International Relations have generally bypassed the study of refugees, and Forced Migration Studies has generally bypassed insights from International Relations. Refugees in International Relations therefore represents an attempt to bridge the divide between these disciplines, and to place refugees within the mainstream of International Relations. Drawing together the work and ideas of a combination of the world's leading and emerging International Relations scholars, Refugees in International Relations considers what ideas from International Relations can offer our understanding of the international politics of forced migration. The insights draw from across the theoretical spectrum of International Relations from realism to critical theory to feminism, covering issues including international cooperation, security, and the international political economy. They engage with some of the most challenging political and practical questions in contemporary forced migration, including peacebuilding, post-conflict reconstruction, and statebuilding. The result is a set of highly original chapters, yielding not only new concepts of wider relevance to International Relations but also insights for academics, policy-makers, and practitioners working on forced migration in particular and humanitarianism in general.

Forced Migration And Global Processes

Author: Francois Crepeau
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739155059
Size: 14.67 MB
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Forced Migration and Global Processes considers the crossroads of forced migration with three global trends: development, human rights, and security. This expert collection studies these complex interactions and aims to help determine what solutions may alleviate most of the human suffering involved in forced migrations.

The Oxford Handbook Of Refugee And Forced Migration Studies

Author: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191645885
Size: 47.21 MB
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Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students worldwide studying displacement either from traditional disciplinary perspectives or as a core component of newer programmes across the Humanities and Social and Political Sciences. Today the field encompasses both rigorous academic research which may or may not ultimately inform policy and practice, as well as action-research focused on advocating in favour of refugees' needs and rights. This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterise this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.

Survival Migration

Author: Alexander Betts
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801468957
Size: 30.47 MB
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International treaties, conventions, and organizations to protect refugees were established in the aftermath of World War II to protect people escaping targeted persecution by their own governments. However, the nature of cross-border displacement has transformed dramatically since then. Such threats as environmental change, food insecurity, and generalized violence force massive numbers of people to flee states that are unable or unwilling to ensure their basic rights, as do conditions in failed and fragile states that make possible human rights deprivations. Because these reasons do not meet the legal understanding of persecution, the victims of these circumstances are not usually recognized as “refugees,” preventing current institutions from ensuring their protection. In this book, Alexander Betts develops the concept of “survival migration” to highlight the crisis in which these people find themselves. Examining flight from three of the most fragile states in Africa—Zimbabwe, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Somalia—Betts explains variation in institutional responses across the neighboring host states. There is massive inconsistency. Some survival migrants are offered asylum as refugees; others are rounded up, detained, and deported, often in brutal conditions. The inadequacies of the current refugee regime are a disaster for human rights and gravely threaten international security. In Survival Migration, Betts outlines these failings, illustrates the enormous human suffering that results, and argues strongly for an expansion of protected categories.

Global Migration

Author: Kavita R. Khory
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 1137007117
Size: 30.68 MB
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Migration is one of the most contentious issues in politics today. Both celebrated and vilified, human mobility raises ethical and legal questions about the rights and responsibilities of individuals and societies wrestling with rising economic inequality and a profound sense of insecurity. Even as capital, goods, and services flow easily over national boundaries, human beings are subjected to intense scrutiny and resistance when crossing borders. In this collection of essays, distinguished scholars probe the challenges and opportunities that global migration presents for contemporary states and societies and its implications for sovereignty, national identity, and citizenship. Multidisciplinary in scope, the book demonstrates how forced and voluntary migrations intersect with global politics, from economic and environmental crises to human rights and security.

Governing The World

Author: Sophie Harman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135049637
Size: 53.17 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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‘Global governance’ has become a key concept in the contemporary study of international politics, yet what the term means and how it works remains in question. Governing the World: Cases in Global Governance takes an alternative approach to understanding the concept by exploring how global governance works in practice through a set of case studies on both classical issues of international relations such as security, labour and trade, and more contemporary concerns such as the environment, international development, and governing the internet. The book explores the processes, practice and politics of global governance by taking a broad look at issues of human rights governance and focusing on detailed aspects of a topic such as torture and rendition to help explain how governance does, or does not, work to students and researchers of international politics alike. Bringing together a diverse and international group of scholars, each chapter responds to a set of questions as to what is being governed, how and who by and offers issue-specific case studies and recommended reading to develop a full understanding of the issue explored and what it means for global governance.

Engendering Forced Migration

Author: Doreen Marie Indra
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9781571811356
Size: 36.98 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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At the turn of the new millenium, war, political oppression, desperate poverty, environmental degradation and disasters, and economic underdevelopment are sharply increasing the ranks of the world's twenty million forced migrants. In this volume, eighteen scholars provide a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary look beyond the statistics at the experiences of the women, men, girls, and boys who comprise this global flow, and at the highly gendered forces that frame and affect them. In theorizing gender and forced migration, these authors present a set of descriptively rich, gendered case studies drawn from around the world on topics ranging from international human rights, to the culture of aid, to the complex ways in which women and men envision displacement and resettlement.