Finding Franklin

Author: Russell A. Potter
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773599622
Size: 49.50 MB
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In 2014 media around the world buzzed with news that an archaeological team from Parks Canada had located and identified the wreck of HMS Erebus, the flagship of Sir John Franklin’s lost expedition to find the Northwest Passage. Finding Franklin outlines the larger story and the cast of detectives from every walk of life that led to the discovery, solving one of the Arctic’s greatest mysteries. In compelling prose, Russell Potter details his decades of work alongside key figures in the era of modern searches and elucidates how shared research and ideas have led to a fuller understanding of the Franklin crew’s final months. Illustrated with images and maps from the last two centuries, Finding Franklin recounts the more than fifty searches for traces of his ships and crew, and the dedicated, often obsessive, men and women who embarked on them. Potter discusses the crucial role that Inuit oral accounts, often cited but rarely understood, played in all of these searches, and continue to play to this day, and offers historical and cultural context to the contemporary debates over the significance of Franklin’s achievement. While examination of HMS Erebus will undoubtedly reveal further details of this mystery, Finding Franklin assembles the stories behind the myth and illuminates what is ultimately a remarkable decades-long discovery.

Finding Franklin

Author: Russell A. Potter
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773547843
Size: 13.53 MB
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The full story of those who have searched for Franklin since his expedition disappeared.

Finding Franklin

Author: Russell A. Potter
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773599614
Size: 71.59 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The full story of those who have searched for Franklin since his expedition disappeared.

Unravelling The Franklin Mystery

Author: David C. Woodman
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 9780773509368
Size: 38.19 MB
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Woodman maintains that fewer than ten bodies were found at Starvation Cove and that the last survivors left the cove in 1851, three years after the standard account assumes them to be dead. Woodman also disputes the conclusion of Owen Beattie and John Geiger's book Frozen in Time that lead-poisoning was a major contributing cause of the disaster. Much of the Inuit testimony presented in Unravelling the Franklin Mystery has never before been published. The earliest Woodman quotes was recorded by Franklin searchers only nine years after the disappearance of the Franklin team. Inuit testimony provided Woodman with the pivotal clue in his re-construction of the puzzle of the Franklin disaster: I proceeded from the assumption that all Inuit stories concerning white men should have a discoverable factual basis ... and] managed to discover a scenario which allowed use of all of the native recollections, solved some troubling discrepancies in the physical evidence, and led to some significant new conclusions as to the fate of the beleaguered sailors. Whether or not one agrees with Woodman's conclusions, his account is compelling and his analysis impressive.

Frozen In Time

Author: Owen Beattie
Publisher: Greystone Books Ltd
ISBN: 1771641746
Size: 68.15 MB
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In 1845, Sir John Franklin and his men set out to “penetrate the icy fastness of the north, and to circumnavigate America.” And then they disappeared. The truth about what happened to Franklin’s ill-fated Arctic expedition was shrouded in mystery for more than a century. Then, in 1984, Owen Beattie and his team exhumed two crew members from a burial site in the North for forensic evidence, to shocking results. But the most startling discovery didn’t come until 2014, when a team commissioned by the Canadian government uncovered one of the lost ships: Erebus.

Sir John Franklin S Erebus And Terror Expedition

Author: Gillian Hutchinson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472948718
Size: 26.68 MB
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In 1845, British explorer Sir John Franklin set out on a voyage to find the North-West Passage – the sea route linking the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific. The expedition was expected to complete its mission within three years and return home in triumph but the two ships, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, and the 129 men aboard them disappeared in the Arctic. The last Europeans to see them alive were the crews of two whaling ships in Baffin Bay in July 1845, just before they entered the labyrinth of the Arctic Archipelago. The loss of this British hero and his crew, and the many rescue expeditions and searches that followed, captured the public imagination, but the mystery surrounding the expedition's fate only deepened as more clues were found. How did Franklin's final expedition end in tragedy? What happened to the crew? The thrilling discoveries in the Arctic of the wrecks of Erebus in 2014 and Terror in 2016 have brought the events of 170 years ago into sharp focus and excited new interest in the Franklin expedition. This richly illustrated book is an essential guide to this story of heroism, endurance, tragedy and dark desperation.

Ice Ghosts The Epic Hunt For The Lost Franklin Expedition

Author: Paul Watson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393249395
Size: 32.73 MB
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“Intriguing [and] enjoyable.”—Ian McGuire, New York Times Book Review Ice Ghosts weaves together the epic story of the lost Franklin Expedition of 1845—whose two ships, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, and their crew of 129 were lost to the Arctic ice—with the modern tale of the scientists, divers, and local Inuit behind the recent incredible discoveries of the wrecks. Paul Watson, a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist who was on the icebreaker that led one of the discovery expeditions, tells a fast-paced historical adventure story and reveals how a combination of faith in Inuit knowledge and the latest science yielded a discovery for the ages.

Franklin S Lost Ship

Author: John Geiger
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 1443450545
Size: 39.47 MB
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The greatest mystery in all of exploration is the fate of the 1845–1848 British Arctic Expedition commanded by Sir John Franklin. All 129 crewmen died, and the two ships seemingly vanished without a trace. The expedition's destruction was a mass disaster spread over two years. With the vessels beset and abandoned, the crew confronted a horrific ordeal. They suffered from lead poisoning, were stricken with scurvy and, ultimately, resorted to cannibalism in their final days. The mysterious fate of the ships, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, has captured the public's imagination for seventeen decades. Now, one of Franklin's lost ships has been found. During the summer of 2014, the Victoria Strait Expedition, the largest effort to find the ships since the 1850s, was led by Parks Canada in partnership with the Arctic Research Foundation, The Royal Canadian Geographical Society, and other public and private partners. The expedition used world-leading technology in underwater exploration and succeeded in a major find—the discovery of Erebus. News of the discovery made headlines around the world. In this fully illustrated account, readers will learn about the exciting expedition, challenging search and the ship's discovery. Featuring the first images of the Erebus, this stunning book weaves together a story of historical mystery and modern adventure.

The Arctic Fox

Author: David Murphy
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1550025236
Size: 12.84 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Shackleton of his day, Leopold McClintock from Dundalk was the leadig Antarctic explorer of the Victorian era. First to bring definite information on the lost Franklin party he rose to admiral and advised Scott before the Discovery expedition in 1901. This tale starts when he enlisted in 1831, not yet twelve years old. He began exploration in 1848 on the Enterprise expedition with Ross, the first in search of Franklin. After two further expeditions, he was the most experienced explorer in the Royal Navy, having sledged over 1,300 miles, over-wintered and discovered Prince Patrick Island. At the request of Lady Franklin he commanded the Fox in 1857 to again search for Franklin. By 1859 he had found written records and human remains after Eskimos told him of a shipwreck and survivors. He returned with the news that the entire crew of the Franklin expedition had perished, was greeted with acclaim and awarded honours. His account of the expedition became a best-seller. After his death a plaque remembering him was unveiled at Westminster Abbey, portraits hung in London's National Portrait Gallery and the McClintock Channel in the Arctic was named after him.