Ethnographic Film

Author: Karl G. Heider
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292779399
Size: 45.97 MB
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Even before Robert Flaherty released Nanook of the North in 1922, anthropologists were producing films about the lifeways of native peoples for a public audience, as well as for research and teaching. Ethnographic Film (1976) was one of the first books to provide a comprehensive introduction to this field of visual anthropology, and it quickly became the standard reference. In this new edition, Karl G. Heider thoroughly updates Ethnographic Film to reflect developments in the field over the three decades since its publication, focusing on the work of four seminal filmmakers—Jean Rouch, John Marshall, Robert Gardner, and Timothy Asch. He begins with an introduction to ethnographic film and a history of the medium. He then considers many attributes of ethnographic film, including the crucial need to present "whole acts," "whole bodies," "whole interactions," and "whole people" to preserve the integrity of the cultural context. Heider also discusses numerous aspects of making ethnographic films, from ethics and finances to technical considerations such as film versus video and preserving the filmed record. He concludes with a look at using ethnographic film in teaching.

American Ethnographic Film And Personal Documentary

Author: Scott MacDonald
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520954939
Size: 60.75 MB
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American Ethnographic Film and Personal Documentary is a critical history of American filmmakers crucial to the development of ethnographic film and personal documentary. The Boston and Cambridge area is notable for nurturing these approaches to documentary film via institutions such as the MIT Film Section and the Film Study Center, the Carpenter Center and the Visual and Environmental Studies Department at Harvard. Scott MacDonald uses pragmatism’s focus on empirical experience as a basis for measuring the groundbreaking achievements of such influential filmmakers as John Marshall, Robert Gardner, Timothy Asch, Ed Pincus, Miriam Weinstein, Alfred Guzzetti, Ross McElwee, Robb Moss, Nina Davenport, Steve Ascher and Jeanne Jordan, Michel Negroponte, John Gianvito, Alexander Olch, Amie Siegel, Ilisa Barbash, and Lucien Castaing-Taylor. By exploring the cinematic, personal, and professional relationships between these accomplished filmmakers, MacDonald shows how a pioneering, engaged, and uniquely cosmopolitan approach to documentary developed over the past half century.

Innovation In Ethnographic Film

Author: Peter Loizos
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226492261
Size: 41.10 MB
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In the first coprehensive introduction to the nature and development of ethnographic film, Peter Loizos reviews fifty of the most important films made between 1955 and 1985. Going beyond programmatic statements, he analyzes the films themselves, identifying and discussing their contributions to ethnographic documentation. Loizos begins by reviewing works of John Marshall and Timothy Asch in the 1950s and moves through those of Jean Rouch, Robert Gardner, and many more recent filmmakers. He reveals a steady course of innovations along four dimensions: production technology, subject matter, strategies of argument, and ethnographic authentication. His analyses of individual films address questions of realism, authenticity, genre, authorial and subjective voice, and representation of the films' creators as well as their subjects. Innovation in Ethnographic Film, as a systematic and iluminating review of developments in ethnographic film, will be an important resource for the growing number of anthropologists and other scholars who use such films as tools for research and teaching.

Experimental Ethnography

Author: Catherine Russell
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822323198
Size: 32.26 MB
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Experimental film and ethnographic film have long been considered separate, autonomous practices on the margins of mainstream cinema. By exploring the interplay between the two forms, Catherine Russell throws new light on both the avant-garde and visual anthropology. Russell provides detailed analyses of more than thirty-five films and videos from the 1890s to the 1990s and discusses a wide range of film and videomakers, including Georges M Elis, Maya Deren, Peter Kubelka, Ray Birdwhistell, Jean Rouch, Su Friedrich, Bill Viola, Kidlat Tahimik, Margaret Mead, Tracey Moffatt, and Chantal Akerman. Combining cultural critique with aesthetic analysis, she explores the dynamics of historical interruption, recovery, and re-evaluation. As disciplinary boundaries dissolve, Russell contends, ethnography is a means of renewing the avant-gardism of "experimental" film, of mobilising its play with language and form for historical ends. "Ethnography" likewise becomes an expansive term in which culture is represented from many different fragmented perspectives.Experimental Ethnography will appeal to visual anthropologists, as well as film scholars interested in experimental and documentary practices.

Cross Cultural Filmmaking

Author: Ilisa Barbash
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520915091
Size: 65.62 MB
Format: PDF
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This extraordinary handbook was inspired by the distinctive concerns of anthropologists and others who film people in the field. The authors cover the practical, technical, and theoretical aspects of filming, from fundraising to exhibition, in lucid and complete detail—information never before assembled in one place. The first section discusses filmmaking styles and the assumptions that frequently hide unacknowledged behind them, as well as the practical and ethical issues involved in moving from fieldwork to filmmaking. The second section concisely and clearly explains the technical aspects, including how to select and use equipment, how to shoot film and video, and the reasons for choosing one or the other, and how to record sound. Finally, the third section outlines the entire process of filmmaking: preproduction, production, postproduction, and distribution. Filled with useful illustrations and covering documentary and ethnographic filmmaking of all kinds, Cross-Cultural Filmmaking will be as essential to the anthropologist or independent documentarian on location as to the student in the classroom.

Doing Visual Ethnography

Author: Sarah Pink
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9781446226957
Size: 64.74 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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'[T]hose already proficient in ethnographic methods will find Doing Visual Ethnography a foray into what should be an increasingly normative terrain and what is certainly a much-needed addition to the literature. They will be challenged to simultaneously take on new methodological conceits and their application beyond traditional boundaries' - Library & Information Science Research Following on from the success of Doing Visual Ethnography, this fully revised and updated second edition explores the use and potential of photography, video and hypermedia in ethnographic and social research. It offers a reflexive approach to theoretical, methodological, practical and ethical issues of using these media now that they are increasingly being incorporated into field research. Sarah Pink adopts the viewpoint that visual research methods should be rooted in a critical understanding of local and academic visual cultures, the visual media and technologies being used and the ethical issues they raise. The book demonstrates that these new challenges that shape ethnographic knowledge can be met by understanding the reflexivity and experience through which visual and ethnographic materials are produced and interpreted. New to the Second Edition: - General updating of figures, terminology and literature to bring the book up-to-date with recent innovations in theory, practice and technology - Annotated reading lists added to each chapter to guide the reader to further literature - Completely rewritten chapter on digital technology to ensure the text is in line with the latest developments in technology and methodological thinking Drawing from her own experiences of using photography, video and hypermedia in research, as well as the work of others, the author follows the research process from project design, planning and implementing and practising fieldwork to analysis and representation, suggesting how visual images and technologies can be combined to form an integrated process throughout the different stages of research. The Second Edition of Doing Visual Ethnography is an excellent resource for students of sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, media studies, and those doing ethnographic and qualitative research. It also provides valuable reading for researchers and postgraduates.

Jero Tapakan Balinese Healer

Author: Linda Connor
Publisher: CUP Archive
ISBN: 9780521322959
Size: 26.90 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Jero Tapakan is a popular village spirit medium on the island of Bali, Indonesia. Clients consult her about problems ranging from physical and mental illness to theft and advice on ritual matters. This book is a fascinating case-study of healing in a Southeast Asian society, and is unique because the book is integrated with film of specific patient treatments, as well as of Jero's own reflections on her life and work. Healer Jero, anthropologist Linda Connor, and ethnographic film-makers Timothy Asch and Patsy Asch collaborated in the study and in the production of the book and films, and for the first time a major academic press has produced a video-cassette of films to accompany the book. The result is an unrivalled resource for people interested in alternative medical systems, and is an important and innovative contribution to ethnographic methodology.

Seeing Anthropology

Author: Karl G. Heider
Publisher: Pearson College Division
ISBN: 9780205483556
Size: 27.79 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Seeing Anthropology continues to be the only cultural anthropology text available that allows for easy integration of ethnographic films into the introductory cultural anthropology course. This text truly incorporates films within the text by blending textbook content with sixteen ethnographic film clips that are put in the hands of students. One reviewer says, “The greatest strengths of this text are its unique and skillful use of film clips to enhance student learning…I can think of no better way to extend student learning in anthropology than the use of films.”

Wondrous Difference

Author: Alison Griffiths
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231116961
Size: 39.94 MB
Format: PDF
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Sugar, pork, beer, corn, cider, scrapple, and hoppin' John all became staples in the diet of colonial America. The ways Americans cultivated and prepared food and the values they attributed to it played an important role in shaping the identity of the newborn nation. In A Revolution in Eating, James E. McWilliams presents a colorful and spirited tour of culinary attitudes, tastes, and techniques throughout colonial America. Confronted by strange new animals, plants, and landscapes, settlers in the colonies and West Indies found new ways to produce food. Integrating their British and European tastes with the demands and bounty of the rugged American environment, early Americans developed a range of regional cuisines. From the kitchen tables of typical Puritan families to Iroquois longhouses in the backcountry and slave kitchens on southern plantations, McWilliams portrays the grand variety and inventiveness that characterized colonial cuisine. As colonial America grew, so did its palate, as interactions among European settlers, Native Americans, and African slaves created new dishes and attitudes about food. McWilliams considers how Indian corn, once thought by the colonists as "fit for swine," became a fixture in the colonial diet. He also examines the ways in which African slaves influenced West Indian and American southern cuisine. While a mania for all things British was a unifying feature of eighteenth-century cuisine, the colonies discovered a national beverage in domestically brewed beer, which came to symbolize solidarity and loyalty to the patriotic cause in the Revolutionary era. The beer and alcohol industry also instigated unprecedented trade among the colonies and further integrated colonial habits and tastes. Victory in the American Revolution initiated a "culinary declaration of independence," prompting the antimonarchical habits of simplicity, frugality, and frontier ruggedness to define American cuisine. McWilliams demonstrates that this was a shift not so much in new ingredients or cooking methods, as in the way Americans imbued food and cuisine with values that continue to shape American attitudes to this day.

Picturing Culture

Author: Jay Ruby
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226730998
Size: 29.55 MB
Format: PDF
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Here, Jay Ruby—a founder of visual anthropology—distills his thirty-year exploration of the relationship of film and anthropology. Spurred by a conviction that the ideal of an anthropological cinema has not even remotely begun to be realized, Ruby argues that ethnographic filmmakers should generate a set of critical standards analogous to those for written ethnographies. Cinematic artistry and the desire to entertain, he argues, can eclipse the original intention, which is to provide an anthropological representation of the subjects. The book begins with analyses of key filmmakers (Robert Flaherty, Robert Garner, and Tim Asch) who have striven to generate profound statements about human behavior on film. Ruby then discusses the idea of research film, Eric Michaels and indigenous media, the ethics of representation, the nature of ethnography, anthropological knowledge, and film and lays the groundwork for a critical approach to the field that borrows selectively from film, communication, media, and cultural studies. Witty and original, yet intensely theoretical, this collection is a major contribution to the field of visual anthropology.