Doppler Radar Weather Observations

Author: Richard J. Doviak
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 148329482X
Size: 13.41 MB
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This book reviews the principles of Doppler radar and emphasizes the quantitative measurement of meteorological parameters. It illustrates the relation of Doppler radar data and images to atmospherix phenomena such as tornados, microbursts, waves, turbulence, density currents, hurricanes, and lightning. Radar images and photographs of these weather phenomena are included. Polarimetric measurements and data processing An updated section on RASS Wind profilers Observations with the WSR-88D An updated treatment of lightning Turbulence in the planetary boundary layer A short history of radar Chapter problem sets

Polarimetric Doppler Weather Radar

Author: V. N. Bringi
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521623841
Size: 19.32 MB
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A 2001 introduction to Doppler and polarimetric radar systems and their uses in meteorology and remote sensing.

Weather Radar

Author: Peter Meischner
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3662052024
Size: 11.73 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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With their images practically ubiquitious in the daily media, weather radar systems provide data not only for understanding weather systems and improving forecasts (especially critical for severe weather), but also for hydrological applications, flood warnings and climate research in which ground verification is needed for global precipitation measurements by satellites. This book offers an accessible overview of advanced methods, applications and modern research from the European perspective. An extensive introductory chapter summarizes the principles of weather radars and discusses the potential of modern radar systems, including Doppler and polarisation techniques, data processing, and error-correction methods. Addressing both specialist researchers and nonspecialists from related areas, this book will also be useful for graduate students planning to specialize in this field

21st Century Geography

Author: Joseph P. Stoltman
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 141297464X
Size: 58.13 MB
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This is a theoretical and practical guide on how to undertake and navigate advanced research in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Weather Radar Technology Beyond Nexrad

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309169453
Size: 57.45 MB
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Weather radar is a vital instrument for observing the atmosphere to help provide weather forecasts and issue weather warnings to the public. The current Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) system provides Doppler radar coverage to most regions of the United States (NRC, 1995). This network was designed in the mid 1980s and deployed in the 1990s as part of the National Weather Service (NWS) modernization (NRC, 1999). Since the initial design phase of the NEXRAD program, considerable advances have been made in radar technologies and in the use of weather radar for monitoring and prediction. The development of new technologies provides the motivation for appraising the status of the current weather radar system and identifying the most promising approaches for the development of its eventual replacement. The charge to the committee was to determine the state of knowledge regarding ground-based weather surveillance radar technology and identify the most promising approaches for the design of the replacement for the present Doppler Weather Radar. This report presents a first look at potential approaches for future upgrades to or replacements of the current weather radar system. The need, and schedule, for replacing the current system has not been established, but the committee used the briefings and deliberations to assess how the current system satisfies the current and emerging needs of the operational and research communities and identified potential system upgrades for providing improved weather forecasts and warnings. The time scale for any total replacement of the system (20- to 30-year time horizon) precluded detailed investigation of the designs and cost structures associated with any new weather radar system. The committee instead noted technologies that could provide improvements over the capabilities of the evolving NEXRAD system and recommends more detailed investigation and evaluation of several of these technologies. In the course of its deliberations, the committee developed a sense that the processes by which the eventual replacement radar system is developed and deployed could be as significant as the specific technologies adopted. Consequently, some of the committee's recommendations deal with such procedural issues.