Digital Community Digital Citizen

Author: Jason B. Ohler
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 1412971446
Size: 26.95 MB
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Best-selling author and educator Jason Ohler addresses how today's globally connected infosphere has broadened the definition of citizenship and its impact on educators, students, and parents.

Digital Citizenship In Schools

Author: Mike Ribble
Publisher: International Society for Technology in Education
ISBN: 1564845184
Size: 45.43 MB
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Students today have always had technology in their lives, so many teachers assume their students are competent tech users — more competent, in fact, than themselves. In reality, not all students are as tech savvy as teachers might assume, and not all teachers are as incompetent as they fear. Even when students are comfortable using technology, they may not be using it appropriately. Likewise, educators of all skill levels may not understand how to use technology effectively. Both students and teachers need to become members of a digital citizenry. In this essential exploration of digital citizenship, Mike Ribble provides a framework for asking what we should be doing with respect to technology so we can become productive and responsible users of digital technologies.

Digital Citizenship In Action

Author: Kristen Mattson
Publisher: ISTE
ISBN: 9781564843937
Size: 26.68 MB
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For years, much of the available curricula for teaching digital citizenship focused on "don'ts." Don't share addresses or phone numbers. Don't give out passwords. Don't bully other students. But the conversation then shifted and had many asking, "Why aren't we teaching kids the power of social media?" Next, digital citizenship curriculum moved toward teaching students how to positively brand themselves so that they would stand out when it came to future scholarships and job opportunities. In the end, both messages failed to address one of the most important aspects of citizenship: being in community with others. As citizens, we have a responsibility to give back to the community and to work toward social justice and equity. Digital citizenship curricula should strive to show students possibilities over problems, opportunities over risks and community successes over personal gain. In Digital Citizenship in Action, you'll find practical ways for taking digital citizenship lessons beyond a conversation about personal responsibility so that you can create opportunities for students to become participatory citizens, actively engaging in multiple levels of community and developing relationships based on mutual trust and understanding with others in these spaces.

Digital Citizenship

Author: Susan M. Bearden
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 148339266X
Size: 32.64 MB
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Make responsible digital citizenship part of your school’s culture! Use this book’s community-based approach to building digital citizenship to teach, learn, and thrive in today’s digital environment. Expertly navigate the pitfalls of the digital world, take hold of the plethora of opportunities available to you, and confidently engage in online connections without fear! Educators, parents, and students will discover how to: Protect privacy and leave positive online footprints Understand creative credits and copyright freedoms Foster responsible digital behaviors through safe and secure practices Enlist all stakeholders to help ingrain digital citizenship into the school culture

Raising A Digital Child

Author: Mike Ribble
Publisher: International Society for Technology in educ
ISBN: 9781564842503
Size: 74.66 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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As a parent, do you ever wonder how you can possibly keep up with all the new technologies your children take for granted? Cell phones, online games, instant messaging, social networking, and other technologies have all become so important in the daily of lives of young people. The kids view this new digital culture as a normal way of life, even though as parents you may feel overwhelmed by all the unfamiliar challenges. Cyber bullies, stalkers, identity theft, intellectual property theftits hard to know just what you can do to confront the risks. You want your children to enjoy all the benefits a technological society has to offer, but at the same time, you want them to stay safe and act as responsible members of society. Raising a Digital Child is your guide to many of the newest and most popular technologies, in parent-friendly language, along with discussions of the risks each might harbor, and the types of behaviors that every child should learn in order to become good a citizen in this new digital world. Also available: Web 2.0: New Tools, New Schools - ISBN 1564842347 Safe Practices for Life Online: A Guide for Middle and High School - ISBN 1564842487 About the Author Mike Ribble has served as a classroom biology teacher, a secondary school administrator, a network manager for a community college, and a university instructor. He received a doctorate in educational leadership from Kansas State University. He is also co-author of the best-selling Digital Citizenship in Schools (ISTE 2007).

Growing Global Digital Citizens

Author: Lee Watanabe Crockett
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781945349119
Size: 51.85 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In Growing Global Digital Citizens, authors Lee Watanabe Crockett and Andrew Churches address how teachers can help students effectively and ethically participate in and contribute to the physical and digital worlds around them. They share the concept of global digital citizenship (GDC), which, when adopted, will help students use technology to learn from one another and better participate in the global community. Through their Global Digital Citizenship Foundation, Crockett and Churches have worked with hundreds of schools around the world to guide the global transformation of education. They give guidance on how K¿12 teachers and administrators can transform their technology use and restrictions in ways that grow global citizens who are respectful, responsible critical thinkers equipped to solve problems in the interconnected world.

Digital Citizenship

Author: Karen Mossberger
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262250195
Size: 53.87 MB
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Just as education has promoted democracy and economic growth, the Internet has the potential to benefit society as a whole. Digital citizenship, or the ability to participate in society online, promotes social inclusion. But statistics show that significant segments of the population are still excluded from digital citizenship. The authors of this book define digital citizens as those who are online daily. By focusing on frequent use, they reconceptualize debates about the digital divide to include both the means and the skills to participate online. They offer new evidence (drawn from recent national opinion surveys and Current Population Surveys) that technology use matters for wages and income, and for civic engagement and voting. Digital Citizenship examines three aspects of participation in society online: economic opportunity, democratic participation, and inclusion in prevailing forms of communication. The authors find that Internet use at work increases wages, with less-educated and minority workers receiving the greatest benefit, and that Internet use is significantly related to political participation, especially among the young. The authors examine in detail the gaps in technological access among minorities and the poor and predict that this digital inequality is not likely to disappear in the near future. Public policy, they argue, must address educational and technological disparities if we are to achieve full participation and citizenship in the twenty-first century.

The Creative Citizen Unbound

Author: Hargreaves, Ian
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1447324951
Size: 23.49 MB
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The creative citizen unbound explores the potential of civically-minded creative individuals in the era of social media and in the context of an expanding creative economy. Contributors examine creative citizenship's contribution to civic life and to social capital and its economic and cultural definitions of value.

Digital Storytelling In The Classroom

Author: Jason B. Ohler
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 1452277435
Size: 36.33 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A must-read for incorporating digital literacy into your classroom! Equip your students with essential 21st-century media literacy skills, as they read, write, speak, and create art within the context of digital storytelling, and reach deeper understandings in all areas of the curriculum! In this second edition, both novice and technologically adept K-12 educators will find: Practical techniques to combine storytelling with curriculum content Tips for exploring effective storytelling principles through emerging digital media as well as via traditional literacy skills in reading, writing, speaking, and art Visual aids and video clips that illustrate best practices in media composition

The Civic Organization And The Digital Citizen

Author: Chris Wells
Publisher: OUP Us
ISBN: 0190203625
Size: 13.67 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The powerful potential of digital media to engage citizens in political actions has now crossed our news screens many times. But scholarly focus has tended to be on "networked," anti-institutional forms of collective action, to the neglect of advocacy and service organizations. This book investigates the changing fortunes of the citizen-civil society relationship by exploring how social changes and innovations in communication technology are transforming the information expectations and preferences of many citizens, especially young citizens. In doing so, it is the first work to bring together theories of civic identity change with research on civic organizations. Specifically, it argues that a shift in "information styles" may help to explain the disjuncture felt by many young people when it comes to institutional participation and politics. The book theorizes two paradigms of information style: a dutiful style, which was rooted in the society, communication system and citizen norms of the modern era, and an actualizing style, which constitutes the set of information practices and expectations of the young citizens of late modernity for whom interactive digital media are the norm. Hypothesizing that civil society institutions have difficulty adapting to the norms and practices of the actualizing information style, two empirical studies apply the dutiful/actualizing framework to innovative content analyses of organizations' online communications-on their websites, and through Facebook. Results demonstrate that with intriguing exceptions, most major civil society organizations use digital media more in line with dutiful information norms than actualizing ones: they tend to broadcast strategic messages to an audience of receivers, rather than encouraging participation or exchange among an active set of participants. The book concludes with a discussion of the tensions inherent in bureaucratic organizations trying to adapt to an actualizing information style, and recommendations for how they may more successfully do so.