Designing Performance Assessment Systems For Urban Teacher Preparation

Author: Francine P. Peterman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135613648
Size: 63.47 MB
Format: PDF
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Designing Performance Assessment Systems for Urban Teacher Preparation presents an argument for, and invites, critical examination of teacher preparation and assessment practices--in light of both the complexity and demands of urban settings and the theories of learning and learning to teach that guide teacher education practices. This dynamic approach distinguishes the authors' stance on urban teacher assessment as one that can help address social justice issues related to gender, race, socioeconomic class, and other differences, and at the same time promote the professional development of all educators engaged in the process of learning to teach. The contextually bound, sociocultural stance that informs this book promises greater teacher and student achievement. Culminating six years of vital dialogue and focused, local activity among teachers and teacher educators from institutions in the Urban Network to Improve Teacher Education, Designing Performance Assessment Systems for Urban Teacher Preparation presents: *the historical context that was examined for this work, a theoretical framework to undergrad teacher preparation assessment, and design principles to guide the development of assessment systems; *four case studies of participants' struggles and successes in designing and implementing these systems; and *a discussion of the importance of context and current trends in assessment practices in urban teaching. This volume is particularly relevant for university and school-based teacher educators who help prepare teachers to work in urban schools, and for personnel in state departments of education and other agencies who are responsible for certification and beginning teacher support. While the focus is on preparing teachers for urban settings, the theoretical and practical foundations and the case studies have broad implications and provide useful insights for anyone involved in developing and using performance assessment systems--teacher educators, university and school administrators, classroom teachers, and educational researchers.

Implementing And Analyzing Performance Assessments In Teacher Education

Author: Joyce E. Many
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1641131217
Size: 12.37 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Teacher education has long relied on locallydeveloped assessments that lack reliability and validity. Rigorous performancebased assessments for preservice teachers have been advanced as one possible way to ensure that all students receive instruction from a highquality teacher. Recently, performancebased assessments have been developed which focus on the application of knowledge of teaching and learning in a classroom setting. Our book explores factors related to the implementation of teacher performance assessments in varying state and institutional contexts. The contributors, teacher educators from across the country, focus on what was learned from inquiries conducted using diverse methodologies (quantitative, qualitative, selfstudies, and mixed methods). Their research encompassed faculty, supervisors, cooperating teachers, and students’ perceptions and concerns of teacher performance assessments, case studies of curricular reform and/or resistance, analyses of experiences and needs as a result of the adoption of such assessments, and examinations of the results of program alignment and reform. The chapters showcase experiences which occurred during highstakes situations, in implementation periods prior to highstakes adoption, and in contexts where programs adopted performance assessments as an institutional policy rather than as a result of a statewide mandate. Endorsements The chapters compiled for Implementing and Analyzing Performance Assessments in Teacher Education edited by Joyce E. Many and Ruchi Bhatnagar, present a thoughtful look at the challenges and solutions embedded in the adoption of teacher performance assessments for preservice teachers. Most chapters feature edTPA, the most commonly used performance assessment now mandated in numerous states and used voluntarily by other programs across the country, and reveal how such assessments shine a bright light on the problems of practice in teacher preparation (stressful timelines, faculty silos, communication with P12 partners, etc.) when new requirements disrupt the status quo. Each chapter tells a valuable story of performance assessment implementation and approaches that offset compliance in favor of inquiry and educative experiences for candidates and programs alike. Andrea Whittaker, Ph.D edTPA National Director Stanford University Graduate School of Education ULSCALE Many and Bhatnagar launch the AAPE book series with a curated volume highlighting the contexts in which teacher educators implement and utilize performance assessments in educator preparation. Together, the chapters present research from various viewpoints—from candidates, faculty, university supervisors, and clinical partners—using diverse methodologies and approaches. The volume contributes significantly to the program assessment research landscape by providing examples of how performance assessments inform preparation at the intersection of praxis and research, and campus and field. These chapters provide a critical foundation for teacher educators eager to leverage performance assessments to improve their programs. Diana B. Lys, EdD. Assistant Dean of Educator Preparation and Accreditation School of Education University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University And School Connections

Author: Irma N. Guadarrama
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1607526026
Size: 58.15 MB
Format: PDF
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The need for strengthening the connections between universitybased teacher education programs and schools has never been greater in an era where standards and accountability systems often play centric roles in practically all aspects of the education field. Within this context, university educators and school practitioners have increasingly focused their attention on how professional development schools produce the multiplicity of outcomes that address the exigencies of quality programs for educating teachers and improving school achievement. In keeping with the mission of producing a collection of papers that inform, enlighten, and motivate readers, Volume 3 of the Professional Development Schools book series provides practitioners and researchers with articles on a substantial variety of themes on the most recent developments of the field. Among the thematic threads that organize Volume 3 are 1) using the national standards to examine and evaluate PDSs; 2) implementation, development and leadership issues relevant to beginning and experienced PDSs; 3) using innovative means for student assessments and mentoring in preservice education within a PDS context; 4) the impact of PDSs on teacher education and student achievement; and 5) cases of PDSs and the value of lessons learned. Volume 3 is similar to the previous two volumes in that it includes both practitioner and researcher strands, however, the authors in the current volume carry a sense of maturity and exudes a tone of confidence in their voice. Professional development schools research is an important aspect of teacher education. The collection of articles in Volume 3 contribute to our understanding of their essential qualities and offer assurance that innovation, change, and quality are building blocks in professional development schools.

Partnering To Prepare Urban Teachers

Author: Francine P. Peterman
Publisher: Peter Lang
ISBN: 9781433101168
Size: 65.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book attempts to present both theoretical and practical perspectives on school and university partnerships that focus on the preparation and retention of urban teachers. In particular, the book focuses on (a) theoretical and historical underpinnings of partnering to prepare urban teachers as social activists; (b) stories from the field, explored through the voices and actions of students, families, teacher educators, and preservice and in-service teachers; and (c) a critical analysis of this work. The research presented is situated in urban settings that mirror those across the United States and represents partnerships in Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Los Angeles, and Wilmington, where school, city, and teacher education communities collaborate to prepare and keep teachers in hard-to-staff, high-needs schools. Case studies included in the text explore multiple perspectives on partnering to prepare urban teachers - including those of urban schoolchildren and their teachers, teacher educators and teachers becoming teacher educators, and parents. Combined, the chapters theoretically and practically detail the layers and conundrums, tribulations and triumphs, contexts and voices of the challenges facing urban teachers, teacher educators, community members, and administrators who work collaboratively to prepare and support teachers as social activists.

The Sage Handbook Of Research On Teacher Education

Author: D. Jean Clandinin
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1526415461
Size: 35.15 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The SAGE Handbook of Research on Teacher Education offers an ambitious and international overview of the current landscape of teacher education research, as well as the imagined futures. The two volumes are divided into sub-sections: Section One: Mapping the Landscape of Teacher Education Section Two: Learning Teacher Identity in Teacher Education Section Three: Learning Teacher Agency in Teacher Education Section Four: Learning Moral & Ethical Responsibilities of Teaching in Teacher Education Section Five: Learning to Negotiate Social, Political, and Cultural Responsibilities of Teaching in Teacher Education Section Six: Learning through Pedagogies in Teacher Education Section Seven: Learning the Contents of Teaching in Teacher Education Section Eight: Learning Professional Competencies in Teacher Education and throughout the Career Section Nine: Learning with and from Assessments in Teacher Education Section Ten: The Education and Learning of Teacher Educators Section Eleven: The Evolving Social and Political Contexts of Teacher Education Section Twelve: A Reflective Turn This handbook is a landmark collection for all those interested in current research in teacher education and the possibilities for how research can influence future teacher education practices and policies. Watch handbook editors D. Jean Clandinin and Jukka Husu and handbook working editorial board members Jerry Rosiek, Mistilina Sato and Auli Toom discuss key aspects of the new handbook: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yee8cZVakfc

Excellence Through Equity

Author: Alan M. Blankstein
Publisher: ASCD
ISBN: 1416622578
Size: 51.53 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Excellence Through Equity is an inspiring look at how real-world educators are creating schools where all students are able to thrive. In these schools, educators understand that equity is not about treating all children the same. They are deeply committed to ensuring that each student receives what he or she individually needs to develop their full potential—and succeed. To help educators with what can at times be a difficult and challenging journey, Blankstein and Noguera frame the book with five guiding principles of Courageous Leadership: - Getting to your core - Making organizational meaning - Ensuring constancy and consistency of purpose - Facing the facts and your fears - Building sustainable relationships They further emphasize that the practices are grounded in three important areas of research that are too often disregarded: (1) child development, (2) neuroscience, and (3) environmental influences on child development and learning. You’ll hear from Carol Corbett Burris, Michael Fullan, Marcus J. Newsome, Paul Reville, Susan Szachowicz, and other bold practitioners and visionary thinkers who share compelling and actionable ideas, strategies, and experiences for closing the achievement gap in your classrooms and school. Ensuring that all students receive an education that cultivates their talents and potential is in all our common interest. As Andy Hargreaves writes in the coda: “The opportunity for all Americans is to articulate and believe in an inspiring vision of educational change that is about what the next genera¬tion of America and Americans should become, not about a target or ranking that the nation should attain.”

Transforming Schools Using Project Based Learning Performance Assessment And Common Core Standards

Author: Bob Lenz
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118739701
Size: 27.23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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It's not what students know, but what they do with what they know that is important Schools are changing in response to this reality, and in Transforming Schools Using Project-Based Learning, Performance Assessment, and Common Core Standards, Bob Lenz, Justin Wells, and Sally Kingston draw on the example of the Envision Education schools, as well as other leading schools around the country, to show how the concept of deeper learning can meet the need for students who are both college and career ready and engaged in their own education. In this book, the authors explain how project-based learning can blend with Common Core-aligned performance assessment for deeper learning. You'll discover how many schools have successfully made the transition from traditional, teacher-centered learning to project-based, deeper learning and find many practical ideas for implementation. Companion DVD and website include videos showing how to implement deeper learning strategies in the classroom Evidence-based descriptions show why deeper learning is right for students Performance assessment experts explain how to align assessments with Common Core by shifting the emphasis from knowing to doing Extensive game plan section provides step-by-step guidance for change Schools are complex organizations, and transformation involves all of the stakeholders, from students to superintendents. But as this book shows, there are amazing benefits to be realized when everyone commits to diving deeper into learning.

Boundary Spanners

Author: Kenneth R. Howey
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 33.74 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book builds on the 2004 AASCU/NASULGC Task Force report, "Crossing Boundaries, the Urban Education Imperative."

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Size: 45.50 MB
Format: PDF
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

Driven By Data

Author: Paul Bambrick-Santoyo
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470548746
Size: 12.86 MB
Format: PDF
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Offers a practical guide for improving schools dramatically that will enable all students from all backgrounds to achieve at high levels. Includes assessment forms, an index, and a DVD.