Defending My Enemy

Author: Aryeh Neier
Publisher: International Debate Education Assn
ISBN: 9781617700453
Size: 20.91 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4961
Download
Are Nazis entitled to freedom of expression? In 1977, Frank Collin, leader of the National Socialist Party of America, sought to hold a Nazi march in Skokie, Illinois. Skokie had one of the largest Holocaust survivor populations outside New York City. Writing from his perspective as national executive director of the ACLU, the author details what happened next.

When The Nazis Came To Skokie

Author: Philippa Strum
Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas
ISBN:
Size: 45.70 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 850
Download
In the Chicago suburb of Skokie, one out of every six Jewish citizens in the late 1970s was a survivor -- or was directly related to a survivor -- of the Holocaust. These victims of terror had resettled in America expecting to lead peaceful lives free from persecution. But their safe haven was shattered when a neo-Nazi group announced its intention to parade there in 1977. Philippa Strum's dramatic retelling of the events in Skokie (and in the courts) shows why the case ignited such enormous controversy and challenged our understanding of and commitment to First Amendment values. The debate was clear-cut: American Nazis claimed the right of free speech while their Jewish "targets" claimed the right to live without intimidation. The town, arguing that the march would assault the sensibilities of its citizens and spark violence, managed to win a court injunction against the marchers. In response, the American Civil Liberties Union took the case and successfully defended the Nazis' right to free speech. Skokie had all the elements of a difficult case: a clash of absolutes, prior restraint of speech, and heated public sentiment. In recreating it, Strum presents a detailed account and analysis of the legal proceedings as well as finely delineated portraits of the protagonists: Frank Collin, National Socialist Party of America leader and the son of a Jewish Holocaust survivor; Skokie community leader Sol Goldstein, a Holocaust survivor who planned a counter demonstration against the Nazis; Skokie mayor Albert Smith, who wanted only to protect his townspeople; and ACLU attorney David Goldberger, caught in the ironic position of being a Jew defending the rights of Nazis against fellow Jews.While the ACLU did win the case, it was a costly victory -- 30,000 of its members left the organization. And in the end, ironically, the Nazis never did march in Skokie. Forcefully argued, Strum's book shows' that freedom of speech must be defended even when the beneficiaries of that defense are far from admirable individuals. It raises both constitutional and moral issues critical to our understanding of free speech and carries important lessons for current controversies over hate speech on college campuses, inviting readers to think more carefully about what the First Amendment really means.

Taking Liberties

Author: Aryeh Neier
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 9781586482916
Size: 80.95 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3737
Download
Since joining the staff of the American Civil Liberties Union in 1963 and becoming its youngest executive director, Aryeh Neier has been at the forefront of efforts to fight for civil liberties, human rights, and social justice. Whether he was confronting police abuse, defending draft opponents or defending free speech, as he did at the ACLU; out-maneuvering the Reagan administration over military abuses in El Salvador, promoting accountability for political crimes in Argentina and Chile or supporting dissidents in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, as he did at Human Rights Watch; or trying to eradicate landmines, promote stability in the Balkans or establish an International Criminal Court, as he has at the Open Society Institute; Aryeh Neier has been methodical, relentless, and unusually successful. In this look back at an amazing career, Neier both reflects on the unintended consequences of some of his victories and why, if he had anticipated them, he might have done things differently; and reveals that some of the various movements of which he was a part had their greatest triumphs under the most adverse circumstances.

Giving Offense

Author: J. M. Coetzee
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226111776
Size: 21.24 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 4882
Download
Winner of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature. J. M. Coetzee presents a coherent, unorthodox analysis of censorship from the perspective of one who has lived and worked under its shadow. The essays collected here attempt to understand the passion that plays itself out in acts of silencing and censoring. He argues that a destructive dynamic of belligerence and escalation tends to overtake the rivals in any field ruled by censorship. From Osip Mandelstam commanded to compose an ode in praise of Stalin, to Breyten Breytenbach writing poems under and for the eyes of his prison guards, to Aleksander Solzhenitsyn engaging in a trial of wits with the organs of the Soviet state, Giving Offense focuses on the ways authors have historically responded to censorship. It also analyzes the arguments of Catharine MacKinnon for the suppression of pornography and traces the operations of the old South African censorship system. "The most impressive feature of Coetzee's essays, besides his ear for language, is his coolheadedness. He can dissect repugnant notions and analyze volatile emotions with enviable poise."—Kenneth Baker, San Francisco Chronicle Book Review "Those looking for simple, ringing denunciations of censorship's evils will be disappointed. Coetzee explicitly rejects such noble tritenesses. Instead . . . he pursues censorship's deeper, more fickle meanings and unmeanings."—Kirkus Reviews "These erudite essays form a powerful, bracing criticism of censorship in its many guises."—Publishers Weekly "Giving Offense gets its incisive message across clearly, even when Coetzee is dealing with such murky theorists as Bakhtin, Lacan, Foucault, and René; Girard. Coetzee has a light, wry sense of humor."—Bill Marx, Hungry Mind Review "An extraordinary collection of essays."—Martha Bayles, New York Times Book Review "A disturbing and illuminating moral expedition."—Richard Eder, Los Angeles Times Book Review

Obscenity Rules

Author: Whitney Strub
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780700619368
Size: 71.90 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 2086
Download
An examination of the landmark 1957 Supreme Court case "Roth v. United States," which for the first time attempted to define what constitutes obscenity in American life and law. Explores this problematic ruling within the broad sweep of American social and legal history.

New York Times V Sullivan

Author: Kermit L. Hall
Publisher: Landmark Law Cases & American
ISBN: 9780700618033
Size: 38.81 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 7701
Download
Two forefront legal historians examine a classic case from the turbulent civil rights era to trace how the New York Times won a key Supreme Court appeal against an Alabama defamation suit, a victory that established important precedents in the areas of free press while significantly advancing civil rights for African-Americans in the Deep South. Simultaneous.

Madison S Music

Author: Burt Neuborne
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 1620970538
Size: 56.63 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2145
Download
Are you sitting down? It turns out that everything you learned about the First Amendment is wrong. For too long, we’ve been treating small, isolated snippets of the text as infallible gospel without looking at the masterpiece of the whole. Legal luminary Burt Neuborne argues that the structure of the First Amendment as well as of the entire Bill of Rights was more intentional than most people realize, beginning with the internal freedom of conscience and working outward to freedom of expression and finally freedom of public association. This design, Neuborne argues, was not to protect discrete individual rights—such as the rights of corporations to spend unlimited amounts of money to influence elections—but to guarantee that the process of democracy continues without disenfranchisement, oppression, or injustice. Neuborne, who was the legal director of the ACLU and has argued numerous cases before the Supreme Court, invites us to hear the “music” within the form and content of Madison’s carefully formulated text. When we hear Madison’s music, a democratic ideal flowers in front of us, and we can see that the First Amendment gives us the tools to fight for campaign finance reform, the right to vote, equal rights in the military, the right to be full citizens, and the right to prevent corporations from riding roughshod over the weakest among us. Neuborne gives us an eloquent lesson in democracy that informs and inspires.

The International Human Rights Movement

Author: Aryeh Neier
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691135150
Size: 72.32 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 7473
Download
"Aryeh Neier's insightful account of the human rights movement underlines the crucial role played by individuals and human rights defenders in speaking out against abuses. This book describes many of the human rights challenges that remain and is essential reading for all those wishing to understand the political challenges of our times."--Kofi Annan, former secretary-general of the United Nations (1997--2006) "Human rights has become a global movement. Aryeh Neier was present at the creation of it, so nobody is better qualified to tell the story of its ongoing and epochal fight against brutality and injustice. We can all be grateful for Neier's life of activism and we can be thankful he has reflected on it with such insight."--Michael Ignatieff, University of Toronto and former leader of the Liberal Party of Canada "Aryeh Neier has done more than anyone else to shape the values and practices of the modern human rights movement. His decades of experience give him a unique perspective to describe the key events and decisions that shaped the movement, to detail its major successes, and to outline the steps that must now be taken to meet the challenges ahead."--Kenneth Roth, executive director, Human Rights Watch "With the intimate knowledge--and authority--of one who has been at the center of the international human rights movement for more than three decades, Aryeh Neier captures the movement's uneven but steady rise to the top of the agenda of the world community. The significant transformations chronicled here, and the struggles of the brave men and women around the world that made these changes possible, form a road map for the enormous challenges that still lie ahead."--Juan E. Mendez, UN special rapporteur on torture and coauthor of Taking a Stand: The Evolution of Human Rights "This is a valuable, lucid, and timely account of the international human rights movement. Neier has the unique authority to guide the public's understanding of this complex landscape, and his book is full of information, vision, and wisdom."--Andrew J. Nathan, Columbia University

Free Speech For Me But Not For Thee

Author: Nat Hentoff
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 9780060995102
Size: 54.85 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7061
Download
Hentoff's timely, fact-filled, and illuminating book describes the current assault on free speech from all points of the political spectrum--even from the traditionally liberal groups now intent on repressing opinions thought "politically incorrect".