Creating Joy And Meaning For The Dementia Patient

Author: Ronda Parsons
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442227567
Size: 41.45 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Creating Joy and Meaning for the Dementia Patient offers a positive approach to dementia care, one that will help caregivers connect the patient’s understanding to the world around him/her, so that even small triumphs can help to bridge the gap from the darkness of dementia to the integrity of the life of the patient.

Loving Someone Who Has Dementia

Author: Pauline Boss
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118002296
Size: 40.79 MB
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Provides guidelines for managing the stress and grief of knowing someone who is suffering from dementia, including how to stay resilient and cope with the emotional strains of caregiving and the meaning of relationships with those who are cognitively impaired. Original.

Love In The Land Of Dementia

Author: Deborah Shouse
Publisher: Central Recovery Press, LLC
ISBN: 1937612503
Size: 60.22 MB
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Caregiver Shouse celebrates spiritual and practical lessons learned on her unscripted yet rewarding journey with her mother through Alzheimer's disease.

A Caregiver S Guide To Alzheimer S Disease Large Print 16pt

Author: Patricia R. Callone
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 145875734X
Size: 57.69 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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An estimated 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. That number continues to grow - by 2050 the number of individuals with Alzheimer's could range from 11.3 million to 16 million. Alzheimer's disease is not a normal part of aging. It is a devastating disorder of the brain's nerve cells that impairs memory, thinking, and behavior. Written for patients, their families, and caregivers, A Caregiver's Guide to Alzheimer's Disease: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier will help readers understand what is physically happening to the brain so they can empower their own special skills and talents throughout the disease process. The book is divided into three sections that correspond to the progression of Alzheimer's and the unique challenges encountered at each stage. Section A: The major part of the book divides the progression of the disease into Stages: the Pre-Clinical Stage; Early-To-Mild Stage, which marks the onset of the disease; Moderate Stage; and the Severe Stage. Hundreds of practical tips geared to coping and compensating at each level of the disease provide support for the affected individual and the caregiver. Section B: A bonus section of questions and answers addresses specific issues caregivers face and give them points to reflect on as they continue the process. Key topics covered include: Legal and financial issues Family Forums in the caregiving process The role of medication at various stages of the disease Helping children understand what is happening to a loved one Handling the holidays and celebrations Making the living environment more stimulating and enjoyable Section C: Lists resources and suggests websites to find additional information about the disease itself as well as related valuable networks. With an abundance of pointers and guidelines for affected individuals, their families, friends and caregivers, A Caregiver's Guide to Alzheimer's Disease: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier is essential for all readers who want to focus on the capabilities that remain instead of those that have been lost.

What If It S Not Alzheimer S

Author: Gary Radin
Publisher: Prometheus Books
ISBN: 1616149698
Size: 78.21 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Although the public most often associates dementia with Alzheimer’s disease, the medical profession now distinguishes various types of “other” dementias. This book is the first and only comprehensive guide dealing with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD), one of the largest groups of non-Alzheimer’s dementias. The contributors are either specialists in their fields or have exceptional hands-on experience with FTD sufferers. Beginning with a focus on the medical facts, the first part defines and explores FTD as an illness distinct from Alzheimer’s disease. Also considered are clinical and medical care issues and practices, as well as such topics as finding a medical team and rehabilitation interventions. The next section on managing care examines the daily care routine including exercise, socialization, adapting the home environment, and behavioral issues. In the following section on caregiver resources, the contributors identify professional and government assistance programs along with private resources and legal options. The final section focuses on the caregiver, in particular the need for respite and the challenge of managing emotions. This new, completely revised edition follows recent worldwide collaboration in research and provides the most current medical information available, a better understanding of the different classifications of FTD, and more clarity regarding the role of genetics. The wealth of information offered in these pages will help both healthcare professionals and caregivers of someone suffering from frontotemporal degeneration.

Connecting Through Music With People With Dementia

Author: Robin Rio
Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
ISBN: 9781846427251
Size: 28.36 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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For people with dementia, the world can become a lonely and isolated place. Music has long been a vital instrument in transcending cognitive issues; bringing people together, and allowing a person to live in the moment. Connecting through Music with People with Dementia explains how a caregiver can learn to use melody or rhythm to connect with someone who may be otherwise non-responsive, and how memories can be stimulated by music that resonates with a part of someone's past. This user-friendly book demonstrates how even simple sounds and movements can engage people with dementia, promoting relaxation and enjoyment. All that's needed to succeed is a love of music, and a desire to gain greater communication and more meaningful interaction with people with dementia. The book provides practical advice on using music with people with dementia, and includes a songbook suggesting a range of popular song choices and a chapter focusing on the importance of caregivers looking after themselves as well as the people they care for. Suitable for both family and professional caregivers with no former experience of music therapy, and for music therapy students and entry level professionals, this accessible book will lay bare the secrets of music therapy to all.

Talking To Alzheimer S

Author: Claudia Strauss
Publisher: New Harbinger Publications
ISBN: 1608822524
Size: 15.37 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Alzheimer's can have a devastating impact on a patient's close relationships and all too often, family members and friends feel so uncomfortable that they end up dreading visits, or simply give up trying to stay in contact with the patient. This book offers a wealth of practical things you can do to stay connected with the Alzheimer's patient in your life. It offers straightforward suggestions and invaluable do's and don'ts, with advice on everything from dealing effectively with the inevitable repetition that occurs in conversations with an Alzheimer's patient to helpful strategies for saying no to unrealistic demands. It also includes thoughtful tips to remind you to take care of your own feelings and suggestions for helping children become comfortable with visiting an Alzheimer's sufferer.

The 36 Hour Day

Author: Nancy L. Mace
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421422247
Size: 28.70 MB
Format: PDF
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Through five editions, The 36-Hour Day has been an essential resource for families who love and care for people with Alzheimer disease. Whether a person has Alzheimer disease or another form of dementia, he or she will face a host of problems. The 36-Hour Day will help family members and caregivers address these challenges and simultaneously cope with their own emotions and needs. Featuring useful takeaway messages and informed by recent research into the causes of and the search for therapies to prevent or cure dementia, this edition includes new information on • devices to make life simpler and safer for people who have dementia• strategies for delaying behavioral and neuropsychiatric symptoms• changes in Medicare and other health care insurance laws• palliative care, hospice care, durable power of attorney, and guardianship• dementia due to traumatic brain injury• choosing a residential care facility• support groups for caregivers, friends, and family members The central idea underlying the book—that much can be done to improve the lives of people with dementia and of those caring for them—remains the same. The 36-Hour Day is the definitive dementia care guide. -- Jeffrey Cummings, MD, ScD, Director, Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health

Untangling Alzheimer S

Author: Tam Cummings
Publisher: BookBaby
ISBN: 0985445033
Size: 14.35 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A gerontologist explains dementia and Alzheimer's disease, from diagnosis to death in terms family and professional caregivers can understand. The stages of dementia, the history of Alzheimer's and the physiology of the disease are explained. Communication techniques, working with and tracking combative behaviors for the doctor are discussed, as well as techniques to address caregiver stress. Activities for person's with dementia are offered. The progression of the disease with an emphasis on the A's of Alzheimer's are provided, giving caregivers a clear explanation of falls, loss of speech, movement and memory. Vignettes from case histories are used to illustrate key points in the book. A detailed and compassionate explanation of the end of life is presented for caregivers.

Memory S Last Breath

Author: Gerda Saunders
Publisher: Hachette Books
ISBN: 0316502634
Size: 48.37 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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NAMED A BEST BOOK OF 2017 BY NPR "For anyone facing dementia, [Saunders'] words are truly enlightening.... Inspiring lessons about living and thriving with dementia."---Maria Shriver, NBC's Today Show A "courageous and singular book" (Andrew Solomon), Memory's Last Breath is an unsparing, beautifully written memoir--"an intimate, revealing account of living with dementia" (Shelf Awareness). Based on the "field notes" she keeps in her journal, Memory's Last Breath is Gerda Saunders' astonishing window into a life distorted by dementia. She writes about shopping trips cut short by unintentional shoplifting, car journeys derailed when she loses her bearings, and the embarrassment of forgetting what she has just said to a room of colleagues. Coping with the complications of losing short-term memory, Saunders, a former university professor, nonetheless embarks on a personal investigation of the brain and its mysteries, examining science and literature, and immersing herself in vivid memories of her childhood in South Africa.