Complexity And Creative Capacity

Author: Kelly Chapman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317398130
Size: 45.15 MB
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Complexity theories gained prominence in the 1990s with a focus on self-organising and complex adaptive systems. Since then, complexity theory has become one of the fastest growing topics in both the natural and social sciences, and touted as a revolutionary way of understanding the behaviour of complex systems. This book uses complexity theory to surface and challenge the deeply held cultural assumptions that shape how we think about reality and knowledge. In doing so it shows how our traditional approaches to generating and applying knowledge may be paradoxically exacerbating some of the ‘wicked’ environmental problems we are currently facing. The author proposes an innovative and compelling argument for rejecting old constructs of knowledge transfer, adaptive management and adaptive capacity. The book also presents a distinctively coherent and comprehensive synthesis of cognition, learning, knowledge and organizing from a complexity perspective. It concludes with a reconceptualization of the problem of knowledge transfer from a complexity perspective, proposing the concept of creative capacity as an alternative to adaptive capacity as a measure of resilience in socio-ecological systems. Although written from an environmental management perspective, it is relevant to the broader natural sciences and to a range of other disciplines, including knowledge management, organizational learning, organizational management, and the philosophy of science.

Disciplining The Undisciplined

Author: Martin Brueckner
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 331971449X
Size: 64.20 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book explores how the interrelated concepts of responsible citizenship, corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability can be interpreted, researched and taught. It contributes to the much-needed debate on the role of universities – and business schools in particular – in the context of rising social and environmental stakes and growing calls for 'doing business the right way'. The book offers diverse perspectives on the concepts of responsible citizenship, CSR and sustainability, with individual contributions focusing on the conceptual implications for specific disciplines, exploring associated challenges and opportunities, and raising methodological and theoretical concerns for the teaching and research of these concepts laden with complexity and ambiguity. The book is divided into three major parts, the first of which presents conceptual, theoretical and ethical issues. In turn, part two explores specific disciplines' perspectives. Lastly, part three presents hands-on experiences from the field. Thanks to this threefold approach, the book not only offers a guide to direct future research, but can also be used as a text for advanced courses on responsible citizenship, CSR and sustainability.

The Governance Of Urban Green Spaces In The Eu

Author: Judith Schicklinski
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315403803
Size: 48.27 MB
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Across European cities the use of urban space is controversial and subject to diverging interests. On the one hand citizens are increasingly aware of the necessity for self-organising to reclaim green spaces. On the other hand local authorities have started to involve citizens in the governance of urban green spaces. While an increased level of citizen participation and conducive conditions for citizens’ self-organisation are a desirable development per se, the risk of functionalising civil society actors by the local authority for neoliberal city development must be kept in mind. Drawing on qualitative and quantitative data collected in 29 European cities from all four European geographic regions, this book examines the governance of urban green spaces and urban food production, focusing on the contribution of citizen-driven activities. Over the course of the book, Schicklinski identifies best practice examples of successful collaboration between citizens and local government. The book concludes with policy recommendations with great practical value for local governance in European cities in times of the growth-turn. This book will be of great relevance to students, scholars, and policy-makers with an interest in environmental governance, urban geography, and sustainable development.

Environmental Justice In India

Author: Gitanjali Nain Gill
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317415604
Size: 69.42 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Modern environmental regulation and its complex intersection with international law has led many jurisdictions to develop environmental courts or tribunals. Strikingly, the list of jurisdictions that have chosen to do this include numerous developing countries, including Bangladesh, Kenya and Malawi. Indeed, it seems that developing nations have taken the task of capacity-building in environmental law more seriously than many developed nations. Environmental Justice in India explores the genesis, operation and effectiveness of the Indian National Green Tribunal (NGT). The book has four key objectives. First, to examine the importance of access to justice in environmental matters promoting sustainability and good governance Second, to provide an analytical and critical account of the judicial structures that offer access to environmental justice in India. Third, to analyse the establishment, working practice and effectiveness of the NGT in advancing a distinctively Indian green jurisprudence. Finally, to present and review the success and external challenges faced and overcome by the NGT resulting in growing usage and public respect for the NGT’s commitment to environmental protection and the welfare of the most affected people. Providing an informative analysis of a growing judicial development in India, this book will be of great interest to students and scholars of environmental justice, environmental law, development studies and sustainable development.