Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment For Education

Author: Jacqueline Leighton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139464280
Size: 74.44 MB
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With the current push toward educational reform, there is great potential for innovation and change, particularly in large scale testing. One area where change is possible is in cognitive diagnostic assessment. Researchers in educational measurement and cognitive psychology are finally in a position to design tests targeted specifically for providing valuable information about students' cognitive strengths and weaknesses. This self-contained volume organizes what is known about cognitive diagnostic assessment in education, including its conceptual and philosophical basis, methods, and applications. The complete list of topics includes educational demand, philosophical rationale, construct validity, cognitive methods, test construction, statistical models, and unresolved issues (e.g., how to best translate diagnostic information into teaching practices). Leighton and Gierl present a comprehensive and up-to-date examination of cognitive diagnostic assessment in education.

Diagnostic Measurement

Author: Andr? A. Rupp
Publisher: Guilford Press
ISBN: 1606235281
Size: 40.47 MB
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This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of diagnostic classification models (DCMs), which are useful for statistically driven diagnostic decision making. DCMs can be employed in a wide range of disciplines, including educational assessment and clinical psychology. For the first time in a single volume, the authors present the key conceptual underpinnings and methodological foundations for applying these models in practice. Specifically, they discuss a unified approach to DCMs, the mathematical structure of DCMs and their relationship to other latent variable models, and the implementation and estimation of DCMs using Mplus. The book's highly accessible language, real-world applications, numerous examples, and clearly annotated equations will encourage professionals and students to explore the utility and statistical properties of DCMs in their own projects. This book will appeal to professionals in the testing industry; professors and students in educational, school, clinical, and cognitive psychology. It will also serve as a useful text in doctoral-level courses in diagnostic testing, cognitive diagnostic assessment, test validity, diagnostic assessment, advanced educational measurement, psychometrics, and item response theory

The Wiley Handbook Of Cognition And Assessment

Author: Andre A. Rupp
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118956575
Size: 30.50 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This state-of-the-art resource brings together the most innovative scholars and thinkers in the field of testing to capture the changing conceptual, methodological, and applied landscape of cognitively-grounded educational assessments. Offers a methodologically-rigorous review of cognitive and learning sciences models for testing purposes, as well as the latest statistical and technological know-how for designing, scoring, and interpreting results Written by an international team of contributors at the cutting-edge of cognitive psychology and educational measurement under the editorship of a research director at the Educational Testing Service and an esteemed professor of educational psychology at the University of Alberta as well as supported by an expert advisory board Covers conceptual frameworks, modern methodologies, and applied topics, in a style and at a level of technical detail that will appeal to a wide range of readers from both applied and scientific backgrounds Considers emerging topics in cognitively-grounded assessment, including applications of emerging socio-cognitive models, cognitive models for human and automated scoring, and various innovative virtual performance assessments

Measurement Theory And Applications For The Social Sciences

Author: Deborah L. Bandalos
Publisher: Guilford Publications
ISBN: 1462532136
Size: 63.86 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Which types of validity evidence should be considered when determining whether a scale is appropriate for a given measurement situation? What about reliability evidence? Using clear explanations illustrated by examples from across the social and behavioral sciences, this engaging text prepares students to make effective decisions about the selection, administration, scoring, interpretation, and development of measurement instruments. Coverage includes the essential measurement topics of scale development, item writing and analysis, and reliability and validity, as well as more advanced topics such as exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, item response theory, diagnostic classification models, test bias and fairness, standard setting, and equating. End-of-chapter exercises (with answers) emphasize both computations and conceptual understanding to encourage readers to think critically about the material.

Assessing Students In The Margin

Author: Michael Russell
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1617353167
Size: 67.25 MB
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The importance of student assessment, particularly for summative purposes, has increased greatly over the past thirty years. At the same time, emphasis on including all students in assessment programs has also increased. Assessment programs, whether they are largescale, districtbased, or teacher developed, have traditionally attempted to assess students using a single instrument administered to students under the same conditions. Educators and test developers, however, are increasingly acknowledging that this practice does not result in valid information, inferences, and decisions for all students. This problem is particularly true for students in the margins, whose characteristics and needs differ from what the public thinks of as the general population of students. Increasingly, educators, educational leaders, and test developers are seeking strategies, techniques, policies, and guidelines for assessing students for whom standard assessment instruments do not function well. Whether used for highstakes decisions or classroombased formative decisions, the most critical element of any educational assessment is validity. Developing and administering assessment instruments that provide valid measures and allow for valid inferences and decisions for all groups of students presents a major challenge for today’s assessment programs. Over the past few decades, several national policies have sparked research and development efforts that aim to increase test validity for students in the margins. This book explores recent developments and efforts in three important areas. The first section focuses on strategies for improving test validity through the provision of test accommodations. The second section focuses on alternate and modified assessments. Federal policies now allow testing programs to develop and administer alternate assessments for students who have not been exposed to gradelevel content, and thus are not expected to demonstrate proficiency on gradelevel assessments. A separate policy allows testing programs to develop modified assessments that will provided more useful information about achievement for a small percentage of students who are exposed to gradelevel content but for whom the standard form of the gradelevel test does not provide a valid measure of achievement. These policies are complex and can be confusing for educators who are not familiar with their details. The chapters in the second section unpack these policies and explore the implications these policies have for test design. The third and final section of the book examines how principles of Universal Design can be applied to improve test validity for all students. Collectively, this volume presents a comprehensive examination of the several issues that present challenges for assessing the achievement of all students. While our understanding of how to overcome these challenges continues to evolve, the lessons, strategies, and avenues for future research explored in this book empower educators, test developers, and testing programs with a deeper understanding of how we can improve assessments for students in the margins.

Sociocognitive Foundations Of Educational Measurement

Author: Robert J. Mislevy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317976517
Size: 60.58 MB
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Several key developments challenge the field of educational measurement today: demands for tests at larger scales with higher stakes, an improved understanding of how people develop capabilities, and new technologies for interactive digital assessments. Sociocognitive Foundations of Educational Measurement integrates new developments in educational measurement and educational psychology in order to provide researchers, testing professionals, and students with an innovative sociocognitive perspective on assessment. This comprehensive volume begins with a broad explanation of the sociocognitive perspective and the foundations of assessment, then provides a series of focused applications to major topics such as assessment arguments, validity, fairness, interactive assessment, and a conception of "measurement" in educational assessment. Classical test theory, item response theory, categorical models, mixture models, cognitive diagnosis models, and Bayesian networks are explored from the resulting perspective. Ideal for specialists in these areas, graduate students, developers, and scholars in both educational measurement and fields that contribute to a sociocognitive perspective, this book consolidates nearly a decade of research into a fresh perspective on educational measurement.

Cognitive Assessment

Author: Kikumi K. Tatsuoka
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135681325
Size: 60.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book introduces a new methodology for the analysis of test results. Free from ambiguous interpretations, the results truly demonstrate an individual’s progress. The methodology is ideal for highlighting patterns derived from test scores used in evaluating progress. Dr. Tatsuoka introduces readers to the Rule Space Method (RSM), a technique that transforms unobservable knowledge and skill variables into observable and measurable attributes. RSM converts item response patterns into attribute mastery probabilities. RSM is the only up-to-date methodology that can handle large scale assessment for tests such as the SAT and PSAT. PSAT used the results from this methodology to create cognitively diagnostic scoring reports. In this capacity, RSM helps teachers understand what scores mean by helping them ascertain an individual’s cognitive strengths and weaknesses. For example, two students may have the exact same score, but for different reasons. One student might excel at processing grammatically complex texts but miss the main idea of the prose, while another excels at understanding the global message. Such knowledge helps teachers customize a student’s education to his or her cognitive abilities. RSM is also used for medical diagnoses, genetics research, and to help classify music into various states of emotions for treating mental problems. The book opens with an overview of cognitive assessment research and nonparametric and parametric person-fit statistics. The Q-matrix theory is then introduced followed by the Rule Space method. Various properties of attribute mastery probabilities are then introduced along with the reliability theory of attributes and its connection to classical and item response theory. The book concludes with a discussion of how the construct validity of a test can be clarified with the Rule Space method. Intended for researchers and graduate students in quantitative, educational, and cognitive psychology, this book also appeals to those in computer science, neuroscience, medicine, and mathematics. The book is appropriate for advanced courses on cognometrics, latent class structures, and advanced psychometrics as well as statistical pattern recognition and classification courses taught in statistics and/or math departments.

Dynamic Assessment In Practice

Author: H. Carl Haywood
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139462075
Size: 22.92 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Dynamic assessment embeds interaction within the framework of a test-intervene-retest approach to psychoeducational assessment. This book offers an introduction to diagnostic assessors in psychology, education, and speech/language pathology to the basic ideas, principles, and practices of dynamic assessment. Most importantly, the book presents an array of specific procedures developed and used by the authors that can be applied to clients of all ages in both clinical and educational settings. The authors discuss their approach to report-writing, with a number of examples to demonstrate how they incorporate dynamic assessment into a comprehensive approach to assessment. The text concludes with a discussion of issues and questions that need to be considered and addressed. Two appendixes include descriptions of additional tests used by the authors that are adapted for dynamic assessment, as well as information about dynamic assessment procedures developed by others and sources for additional information about this approach.

Cognition Intelligence And Achievement

Author: Timothy Papadopoulos
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 0124104444
Size: 74.92 MB
Format: PDF
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Cognition, Intelligence, and Achievement is motivated by the work of the renowned Professor J. P. Das on the PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous and Successive Processing) theory of intelligence and CAS measures (Cognitive Assessment System) of cognitive processes. This book reviews current research using this and other frameworks in understanding the relationships among cognition, intelligence, and achievement. The assessment and diagnosis of learning disabilities, mental retardation, and ADHD are addressed, and the interrelationships among cognition, culture, neuropsychology, academic achievement, instruction, and remediation are examined. No other book has presented such an integrated view across these domains, from such a diverse array of internationally known and respected experts from psychology, education, and neuroscience. Summarizes decades of research on PASS theory and use of CAS Discusses how findings in the neuropsychology of intelligence speak to PASS theory use and application Covers use of PASS and CAS for assessing and treating a variety of learning disabilities Outlines use of PASS and CAS for enhancing learning and cognitive processes

Psychometrics And Psychological Assessment

Author: Carina Coulacoglou
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 0128024909
Size: 40.70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Psychometrics and Psychological Assessment: Principles and Applications reports on contemporary perspectives and models on psychological assessment and their corresponding measures. It highlights topics relevant to clinical and neuropsychological domains, including cognitive abilities, adaptive behavior, temperament, and psychopathology.Moreover, the book examines a series of standard as well as novel methods and instruments, along with their psychometric properties, recent meta-analytic studies, and their cross-cultural applications. Discusses psychometric issues and empirical studies that speak to same Explores the family context in relation to children’s behavioral outcomes Features major personality measures as well as their cross cultural variations Identifies the importance of coping and resilience in assessing personality and psychopathology Examines precursors of aggression and violence for prediction and prevention