Masterpieces Of Chicago Architecture

Author: John Zukowsky
Publisher: Rizzoli International Publications
ISBN: 9780847825967
Size: 46.54 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Over 200 illustrations drawn from the Art Institute of Chicago's repository of architectural drawings, models, and building fragments present a striking record of Chicago's great buildings and structures.

A View From The River

Author: Jennifer Marjorie Bosch
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780764979873
Size: 28.16 MB
Format: PDF
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The story of Chicago is the story of its river. A View from the River is an essential guide to more than 60 significant buildings and structures along the Chicago River. This visual tour, filled with stunning contemporary photography and a variety of historical images, serves as a companion to the Chicago Architecture Foundation River Cruise aboard Chicago's First Lady Cruises.Since Chicago was founded in the 1830s, architects and engineers have designed this city through a series of unforgettable engineering marvels, from the buildings of the Chicago skyline to the Chicago River itself. The river, though a natural feature, has been dredged, straightened, and even had its direction reversed in the past 200 years. Today, the river flows through a canyon of skyscrapers, civic structures, waterside homes, and parks.As the city grows and changes, the river and our understanding of it changes as well. Now in its third edition, A View from the River is updated to reflect the city's latest developments and to further explore Chicago's past, present, and future.

Lost Chicago

Author: David Lowe
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226494322
Size: 73.61 MB
Format: PDF
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The City of Big Shoulders has always been our most quintessentially American—and world-class—architectural metropolis. In the wake of the Great Fire of 1871, a great building boom—still the largest in the history of the nation—introduced the first modern skyscrapers to the Chicago skyline and began what would become a legacy of diverse, influential, and iconoclastic contributions to the city’s built environment. Though this trend continued well into the twentieth century, sour city finances and unnecessary acts of demolishment left many previous cultural attractions abandoned and then destroyed. Lost Chicago explores the architectural and cultural history of this great American city, a city whose architectural heritage was recklessly squandered during the second half of the twentieth century. David Garrard Lowe’s crisp, lively prose and over 270 rare photographs and prints, illuminate the decades when Gustavus Swift and Philip D. Armour ruled the greatest stockyards in the world; when industrialists and entrepreneurs such as Cyrus McCormick, Potter Palmer, George Pullman, and Marshall Field made Prairie Avenue and State Street the rivals of New York City’s Fifth Avenue; and when Louis Sullivan, Daniel Burnham, and Frank Lloyd Wright were designing buildings of incomparable excellence. Here are the mansions and grand hotels, the office buildings that met technical perfection (including the first skyscraper), and the stores, trains, movie palaces, parks, and racetracks that thrilled residents and tourists alike before falling victim to the wrecking ball of progress. “Lost Chicago is more than just another coffee table gift, more than merely a history of the city’s architecture; it is a history of the whole city as a cultural creation.”—New York Times Book Review

Henry Ives Cobb S Chicago

Author: Edward W. Wolner
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226905616
Size: 42.49 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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When championing the commercial buildings and homes that made the Windy City famous, one can’t help but mention the brilliant names of their architects—Daniel Burnham, Louis Sullivan, and Frank Lloyd Wright, among others. But few people are aware of Henry Ives Cobb (1859–1931), the man responsible for an extraordinarily rich chapter in the city’s turn-of-the-century building boom, and fewer still realize Cobb’s lasting importance as a designer of the private and public institutions that continue to enrich Chicago’s exceptional architectural heritage. Henry Ives Cobb’s Chicago is the first book about this distinguished architect and the magnificent buildings he created, including the Newberry Library, the Chicago Historical Society, the Chicago Athletic Association, the Fisheries Building for the 1893 World’s Fair, and the Chicago Federal Building. Cobb filled a huge institutional void with his inventive Romanesque and Gothic buildings—something that the other architect-giants, occupied largely with residential and commercial work, did not do. Edward W. Wolner argues that these constructions and the enterprises they housed—including the first buildings and master plan for the University of Chicago—signaled that the city had come of age, that its leaders were finally pursuing the highest ambitions in the realms of culture and intellect. Assembling a cast of colorful characters from a free-wheeling age gone by, and including over 140 images of Cobb’s most creative buildings, Henry Ives Cobb’s Chicago is a rare achievement: a dynamic portrait of an architect whose institutional designs decisively changed the city’s identity during its most critical phase of development.

Pocket Guide To Chicago Architecture Norton Pocket Guides

Author: Judith Paine McBrien
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 039373384X
Size: 41.57 MB
Format: PDF
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“A handy guidebook that profiles a building per page, with a drawing and vital statistics on most of Chicago’s major historic and modern buildings.”—Chicago Tribune Updated and expanded to chart the changing urban landscape of Chicago--as well as to incorporate a section on Chicago’s campus architecture, including works by Rem Koolhaas at the Illinois Institute of Technology and Frank Lloyd Wright at the University of Chicago--the second edition of this popular handbook is a perfect companion for walking tours and an excellent source of background information for exploring the internationally acclaimed architecture of Chicago. Over 100 highlights of downtown Chicago are covered, from Michigan Avenue to the riverfront to the Loop, with accompanying maps, a glossary of architectural terms, and an index of architects and buildings.

The Chicago School Of Architecture

Author: Rolf Achilles
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 0747813817
Size: 16.67 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The birth of the skyscraper in Chicago in the mid-1880s introduced a new direction for city architecture: upwards. But how-and why- was it that Chicago set the standard for high-rise buildings, not only across the USA but all over the world? Rolf Achilles here introduces the style of the First Chicago School from 1880 to 1910, explaining the innovative use of iron frames for strength, height and openness, and the ubiquity of gridded window arrangements. With reference to such famous architects as William Le Baron Jenny and Frank Lloyd Wright, and colorful pictures of, among many others, the Reliance, Brooks and Marquette buildings, this book is a fascinating exploration of the structures that helped to give Chicago its identity, and the world a new way of building.

Chicago 1890

Author: Joanna Merwood-Salisbury
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780226520780
Size: 24.66 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Chicago’s first skyscrapers are famous for projecting the city’s modernity around the world. But what did they mean at home, to the Chicagoans who designed and built them, worked inside their walls, and gazed up at their façades? Answering this multifaceted question, Chicago 1890 reveals that early skyscrapers offered hotly debated solutions to the city’s toughest problems and, in the process, fostered an urban culture that spread across the country. An ambitious reinterpretation of the works of Louis Sullivan, Daniel Burnham, and John Wellborn Root, this volume uses their towering achievements as a lens through which to view late nineteenth-century urban history. Joanna Merwood-Salisbury sheds new light on many of Chicago’s defining events—including violent building trade strikes, the Haymarket bombing, the World’s Columbian Exposition, and Burnham’s Plan of Chicago—by situating the Masonic Temple, the Monadnock Building, and the Reliance Building at the center of the city’s cultural and political crosscurrents. While architects and property owners saw these pioneering structures as manifestations of a robust American identity, immigrant laborers and social reformers viewed them as symbols of capitalism’s inequity. Illuminated by rich material from the period’s popular press and professional journals, Merwood-Salisbury’s chronicle of this contentious history reveals that the skyscraper’s vaunted status was never as inevitable as today’s skylines suggest.

Building Chicago

Author: John Zukowsky
Publisher: Rizzoli International Publications
ISBN: 9780847848706
Size: 18.51 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Building Chicago presents the best of this country’s first city of architecture. Colloquially known as America’s "second city," Chicago is widely regarded as this country’s crown jewel when it comes to architecture. The roster of masters who have helped shape its skyline and streetscape stands as a who’s who of the architectural pantheon from the last two hundred years, from Louis Sullivan, Daniel Burnham, and Frank Lloyd Wright to Mies van der Rohe and Frank Gehry. Lavishly illustrated, this volume compellingly displays the masterworks of Chicago architecture—from the Chicago Tribune Tower (1925) and the Rookery (1888) by Burnham & Root to the Trump International Hotel and Tower (2008) by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and the residential skyscraper Aqua (2009) by Jeanne Gang. It features the city’s beloved masterpieces by Wright, including the Robie House, such milestones as the Willis Tower and the John Hancock Building, Gehry’s Pritzker Bandshell, as well as a wealth of little-known treasures from Chicago’s early days culled from the vast collection of the Chicago History Museum. "

A Guide To Chicago S Murals

Author: Mary Lackritz Gray
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226305998
Size: 60.73 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Provides information on more than seven hundred murals found in Chicago, Illinois.

The Chicago Bungalow

Author: Chicago Architecture Foundation
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 143961377X
Size: 54.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Chicago Bungalow is more than a housing style indigenous to the city. It epitomizes Chicago's work ethic and its rewards for successive waves of ethnic newcomers to the city since the early 20th century. In this book, the Chicago Architecture Foundation interprets both the design and the meaning of these homes, in keeping with CAF's mission to raise awareness of Chicago's architectural legacy. After 1915, new neighborhoods appeared across the prairie. The Chicago-style bungalow came to both dominate and symbolize these areas. A one and one-half story single-family freestanding home, it included such conveniences as electricity, indoor plumbing, and central heat. Chicagoans built some 80,000 bungalows. Another 20,000 were built in suburban Cook County. Nearly every ethnic and racial group in the area has made its way at one time or another to the Bungalow Belt. Today the Bungalow Belt includes white ethnic, African American, Latino, and Asian families.