Changing Clothes In China

Author: Antonia Finnane
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231512732
Size: 50.91 MB
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Based largely on nineteenth and twentieth-century representations of Chinese dress as traditional and unchanging, historians have long regarded fashion as something peculiarly Western. But in this surprising, sumptuously illustrated book, Antonia Finnane proves that vibrant fashions were a vital part of Chinese life in the late imperial era, when well-to-do men and women showed a keen awareness of what was up-to-date. Though foreigners who traveled to China in the early decades of the twentieth century came away with the impression that Chinese dress was simple and monotone, the key features of modern fashion were beginning to emerge, especially in Shanghai. Men in blue gowns donned felt caps and leather shoes, girls began to wear fitted jackets and narrow pants, and homespun garments gave way to machine-woven cloth, often made in foreign lands. These innovations marked the start of a far-reaching vestimentary revolution that would transform the clothing culture in urban and much of rural China over the next half century. Through Finnane's meticulous research, we are able to see how the close-fitting jacket and high collar of the 1911 Revolutionary period, the skirt and jacket-blouse of the May Fourth era, and the military style popular in the Cultural Revolution led to the variegated, globalized wardrobe of today. She brilliantly connects China's modernization and global visibility with changes in dress, offering a vivid portrait of the complex, subtle, and sometimes contradictory ways the people of China have worn their nation on their backs.

Empire To Nation

Author: Joseph Esherick
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742540316
Size: 21.44 MB
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The fall of empires and the rise of nation-states was a defining political transition in the making of the modern world. Here, ten prominent specialists discuss the empire-to-nation transition in comparative perspective. Chapters on Latin America, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Russia, and China illustrate both the common features and the diversity of the transition. While previous studies have focused on the rise and fall of empires or on nationalism and the process of nation-building, this intriguing volume concentrates on the empire-to-nation transition itself.

Let 100 Voices Speak

Author: Liz Carter
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857739212
Size: 17.93 MB
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From the Occupy movement in the Western world to the role of Twitter in the Middle East, the internet is changing the global landscape. China is next. Despite being a heavily censored society, China has over 600 million active internet users. With the help of inventive memes and Chinese puns, political news, gossip and satire have spread through the internet underground, becoming practically impossible to contain. Social media expert and China-watcher Liz Carter here tells the story of a coming together of activists and ordinary people on an unprecedented scale. A grassroots shift of assumptions and expectations has taken place, as Chinese men and women have rejected the party-line, top-down status quo and sought out new forms of self-expression and communication with the world. Let 100 Voices Speak is the must-read guide to a changing China, and the future of protest and censorship in the internet age.

Changing Media Changing China

Author: Susan L. Shirk
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199751978
Size: 21.23 MB
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Thirty years ago, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) made a fateful decision: to allow newspapers, magazines, television, and radio stations to compete in the marketplace instead of being financed exclusively by the government. The political and social implications of that decision are still unfolding as the Chinese government, media, and public adapt to the new information environment. Edited by Susan Shirk, one of America's leading experts on contemporary China, this collection of essays brings together a who's who of experts--Chinese and American--writing about all aspects of the changing media landscape in China. In detailed case studies, the authors describe how the media is reshaping itself from a propaganda mouthpiece into an agent of watchdog journalism, how politicians are reacting to increased scrutiny from the media, and how television, newspapers, magazines, and Web-based news sites navigate the cross-currents between the open marketplace and the CCP censors. China has over 360 million Internet users, more than any other country, and an astounding 162 million bloggers. The growth of Internet access has dramatically increased the information available, the variety and timeliness of the news, and its national and international reach. But China is still far from having a free press. As of 2008, the international NGO Freedom House ranked China 181 worst out of 195 countries in terms of press restrictions, and Chinese journalists have been aptly described as "dancing in shackles." The recent controversy over China's censorship of Google highlights the CCP's deep ambivalence toward information freedom. Covering everything from the rise of business media and online public opinion polling to environmental journalism and the effect of media on foreign policy, Changing Media, Changing China reveals how the most populous nation on the planet is reacting to demands for real news.

Is Taiwan Chinese

Author: Melissa J. Brown
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520231821
Size: 50.80 MB
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Annotation Melissa Brown looks at the issue of Tiawan - specifically whether or not the Taiwanese are of Chinese/Han ethnicity (as is claimed by the Chinese government) - or is there in fact a Taiwanese ethnicity that is in fact unique unto itself (as the Taiwanese claim).

A History Of China

Author: J. A. G. Roberts
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 1349277045
Size: 80.89 MB
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This study aims to provide an accessible account of the history of China from the earliest times to the present day. Its subject matter extends from the ambitions of the First Emperor to the conquest of China by the Mongols and to the triumphs and tribulations of the People's Republic. It also offers an analysis of the interpretations of Chinese history contained in recent scholarly works.

China S New Confucianism

Author: Daniel A. Bell
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400834822
Size: 20.55 MB
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What is it like to be a Westerner teaching political philosophy in an officially Marxist state? Why do Chinese sex workers sing karaoke with their customers? And why do some Communist Party cadres get promoted if they care for their elderly parents? In this entertaining and illuminating book, one of the few Westerners to teach at a Chinese university draws on his personal experiences to paint an unexpected portrait of a society undergoing faster and more sweeping changes than anywhere else on earth. With a storyteller's eye for detail, Daniel Bell observes the rituals, routines, and tensions of daily life in China. China's New Confucianism makes the case that as the nation retreats from communism, it is embracing a new Confucianism that offers a compelling alternative to Western liberalism. Bell provides an insider's account of Chinese culture and, along the way, debunks a variety of stereotypes. He presents the startling argument that Confucian social hierarchy can actually contribute to economic equality in China. He covers such diverse social topics as sex, sports, and the treatment of domestic workers. He considers the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, wondering whether Chinese overcompetitiveness might be tempered by Confucian civility. And he looks at education in China, showing the ways Confucianism impacts his role as a political theorist and teacher. By examining the challenges that arise as China adapts ancient values to contemporary society, China's New Confucianism enriches the dialogue of possibilities available to this rapidly evolving nation. In a new preface, Bell discusses the challenges of promoting Confucianism in China and the West.

Jesus In Beijing

Author: David Aikman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1596986522
Size: 62.44 MB
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This book details the great unreported story of the Chinese giant, its enormously rapid conversion to Christianity, and what this change means to the global balance of power.

Unearthing The Nation

Author: Grace Yen Shen
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022609054X
Size: 28.15 MB
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Questions of national identity have long dominated China’s political, social, and cultural horizons. So in the early 1900s, when diverse groups in China began to covet foreign science in the name of new technology and modernization, questions of nationhood came to the fore. In Unearthing the Nation, Grace Yen Shen uses the development of modern geology to explore this complex relationship between science and nationalism in Republican China. Shen shows that Chinese geologists—in battling growing Western and Japanese encroachment of Chinese sovereignty—faced two ongoing challenges: how to develop objective, internationally recognized scientific authority without effacing native identity, and how to serve China when China was still searching for a stable national form. Shen argues that Chinese geologists overcame these obstacles by experimenting with different ways to associate the subjects of their scientific study, the land and its features, with the object of their political and cultural loyalties. This, in turn, led them to link national survival with the establishment of scientific authority in Chinese society. The first major history of modern Chinese geology, Unearthing the Nation introduces the key figures in the rise of the field, as well as several key organizations, such as the Geological Society of China, and explains how they helped bring Chinese geology onto the world stage.

By All Means Necessary

Author: Elizabeth Economy
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199921784
Size: 44.94 MB
Format: PDF
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A comprehensive account of the Chinese economy's considerable growth in recent decades traces their efforts to obtain the considerable resources needed to maintain the country's expansion, exploring how their efforts have had benefits and consequences for the rest of the world.