Canaan Land

Author: Albert J. Raboteau
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195145854
Size: 19.87 MB
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Offers insight into the history of African American religious traditions in the United States.

Slave Religion

Author: Albert J. Raboteau
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198020318
Size: 48.18 MB
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Twenty-five years after its original publication, Slave Religion remains a classic in the study of African American history and religion. In a new chapter in this anniversary edition, author Albert J. Raboteau reflects upon the origins of the book, the reactions to it over the past twenty-five years, and how he would write it differently today. Using a variety of first and second-hand sources-- some objective, some personal, all riveting-- Raboteau analyzes the transformation of the African religions into evangelical Christianity. He presents the narratives of the slaves themselves, as well as missionary reports, travel accounts, folklore, black autobiographies, and the journals of white observers to describe the day-to-day religious life in the slave communities. Slave Religion is a must-read for anyone wanting a full picture of this "invisible institution."

Religion In The Lives Of African Americans

Author: Robert Joseph Taylor
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 0761917098
Size: 75.60 MB
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Deriving conclusions from the National Survey of Black Americans and several additional wide-ranging surveys, Religion in the Lives of African Americans examines broad issues: patterns of religious involvement; the functions of religion in coping, social support, etc.; and the relationships between religion and physical and mental health and well-being. Since the early 1900s, there has been ongoing academic interest in the nature, patterns, and functions of religion in the lives of African Americans because of the pervasiveness and persistence of the religious context in the lives of individuals, families and communities for this population group. This book enhances and furthers such academic interest by presenting a comprehensive, integrated analysis based upon rigorous, systematic survey research. The authors provide readers with an authoritative profile of the importance of religious involvement in relation to diverse forms of behaviours, attitudes and perceptions.

African American Religious History

Author: Milton C. Sernett
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822324492
Size: 79.38 MB
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This is a 2nd edition of the 1985 anthology that examines the religious history of African Americans.

A Fire In The Bones

Author: Albert J. Raboteau
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 9780807009338
Size: 41.40 MB
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Traces the history of the African American religious experience and shows how the active faith of African Americans empowered the struggle for social justice throughout history

Jesus Jobs And Justice

Author: Bettye Collier-Thomas
Publisher: Knopf
ISBN: 9780307593054
Size: 59.76 MB
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“The Negroes must have Jesus, Jobs, and Justice,” declared Nannie Helen Burroughs, a nationally known figure among black and white leaders and an architect of the Woman’s Convention of the National Baptist Convention. Burroughs made this statement about the black women’s agenda in 1958, as she anticipated the collapse of Jim Crow segregation and pondered the fate of African Americans. Following more than half a century of organizing and struggling against racism in American society, sexism in the National Baptist Convention, and the racism and paternalism of white women and the Southern Baptist Convention, Burroughs knew that black Americans would need more than religion to survive and to advance socially, economically, and politically. Jesus, jobs, and justice are the threads that weave through two hundred years of black women’s experiences in America. Bettye Collier-Thomas’s groundbreaking book gives us a remarkable account of the religious faith, social and political activism, and extraordinary resilience of black women during the centuries of American growth and change. It shows the beginnings of organized religion in slave communities and how the Bible was a source of inspiration; the enslaved saw in their condition a parallel to the suffering and persecution that Jesus had endured. The author makes clear that while religion has been a guiding force in the lives of most African Americans, for black women it has been essential. As co-creators of churches, women were a central factor in their development. Jesus, Jobs, and Justice explores the ways in which women had to cope with sexism in black churches, as well as racism in mostly white denominations, in their efforts to create missionary societies and form women’s conventions. It also reveals the hidden story of how issues of sex and sexuality have sometimes created tension and divisions within institutions. Black church women created national organizations such as the National Association of Colored Women, the National League of Colored Republican Women, and the National Council of Negro Women. They worked in the interracial movement, in white-led Christian groups such as the YWCA and Church Women United, and in male-dominated organizations such as the NAACP and National Urban League to demand civil rights, equal employment, and educational opportunities, and to protest lynching, segregation, and discrimination. And black women missionaries sacrificed their lives in service to their African sisters whose destiny they believed was tied to theirs. Jesus, Jobs, and Justice restores black women to their rightful place in American and black history and demonstrates their faith in themselves, their race, and their God. From the Hardcover edition.

Religion In American Life

Author: Jon Butler
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199913293
Size: 53.12 MB
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"Quite ambitious, tracing religion in the United States from European colonization up to the 21st century.... The writing is strong throughout."--Publishers Weekly (starred review) "One can hardly do better than Religion in American Life.... A good read, especially for the uninitiated. The initiated might also read it for its felicity of narrative and the moments of illumination that fine scholars can inject even into stories we have all heard before. Read it."--Church History This new edition of Religion in American Life, written by three of the country's most eminent historians of religion, offers a superb overview that spans four centuries, illuminating the rich spiritual heritage central to nearly every event in our nation's history. Beginning with the state of religious affairs in both the Old and New Worlds on the eve of colonization and continuing through to the present, the book covers all the major American religious groups, from Protestants, Jews, and Catholics to Muslims, Hindus, Mormons, Buddhists, and New Age believers. Revised and updated, the book includes expanded treatment of religion during the Great Depression, of the religious influences on the civil rights movement, and of utopian groups in the 19th century, and it now covers the role of religion during the 2008 presidential election, observing how completely religion has entered American politics.

Religion And The Creation Of Race And Ethnicity

Author: Craig R. Prentiss
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814767009
Size: 79.39 MB
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This volume, meant specifically for those new to the field, brings together an ensemble of prominent scholars and illuminates the role religious myths have played in shaping those social boundaries that we call "races" and "ethnicities".

American Prophets

Author: Albert J. Raboteau
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400874408
Size: 15.29 MB
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American Prophets sheds critical new light on the lives and thought of seven major prophetic figures in twentieth-century America whose social activism was motivated by a deeply felt compassion for those suffering injustice. In this compelling and provocative book, acclaimed religious scholar Albert Raboteau tells the remarkable stories of Abraham Joshua Heschel, A. J. Muste, Dorothy Day, Howard Thurman, Thomas Merton, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Fannie Lou Hamer—inspired individuals who succeeded in conveying their vision to the broader public through writing, speaking, demonstrating, and organizing. Raboteau traces how their paths crossed and their lives intertwined, creating a network of committed activists who significantly changed the attitudes of several generations of Americans about contentious political issues such as war, racism, and poverty. Raboteau examines the influences that shaped their ideas and the surprising connections that linked them together. He discusses their theological and ethical positions, and describes the rhetorical and strategic methods these exemplars of modern prophecy used to persuade their fellow citizens to share their commitment to social change. A momentous scholarly achievement as well as a moving testimony to the human spirit, American Prophets represents a major contribution to the history of religion in American politics. This book is essential reading for anyone who is concerned about social justice, or who wants to know what prophetic thought and action can mean in today's world.

Gods In America

Author: Charles L. Cohen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199931925
Size: 79.36 MB
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Religious pluralism has characterized America almost from its seventeenth-century inception, but the past half century or so has witnessed wholesale changes in the religious landscape. Gods in America brings together leading scholars from a variety of disciplines to explain the historical roots of these phenomena and assess their impact on modern American society.