Blame Welfare Ignore Poverty And Inequality

Author: Joel F. Handler
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139461168
Size: 48.35 MB
Format: PDF
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With the passage of the 1996 welfare reform, not only welfare, but poverty and inequality have disappeared from the political discourse. The decline in the welfare rolls has been hailed as a success. This book challenges that assumption. It argues that while many single mothers left welfare, they have joined the working poor, and fail to make a decent living. The book examines the persistent demonization of poor single-mother families; the impact of the low-wage market on perpetuating poverty and inequality; and the role of the welfare bureaucracy in defining deserving and undeserving poor. It argues that the emphasis on family values - marriage promotion, sex education and abstinence - is misguided and diverts attention from the economic hardships low-income families face. The book proposes an alternative approach to reducing poverty and inequality that centers on a children's allowance as basic income support coupled with jobs and universal child care.

Latinos In American Society

Author: Ruth Enid Zambrana
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801461521
Size: 18.43 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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It is well known that Latinos in the United States bear a disproportionate burden of low educational attainment, high residential segregation, and low visibility in the national political landscape. In Latinos in American Society, Ruth Enid Zambrana brings together the latest research on Latinos in the United States to demonstrate how national origin, age, gender, socioeconomic status, and education affect the well-being of families and individuals. By mapping out how these factors result in economic, social, and political disadvantage, Zambrana challenges the widespread negative perceptions of Latinos in America and the single story of Latinos in the United States as a monolithic group. Synthesizing an increasingly substantial body of social science research-much of it emerging from the interdisciplinary fields of Chicano studies, U.S. Latino studies, critical race studies, and family studies-the author adopts an intersectional "social inequality lens" as a means for understanding the broader sociopolitical dynamics of the Latino family, considering ethnic subgroup diversity, community context, institutional practices, and their intersections with family processes and well-being. Zambrana, a leading expert on Latino populations in America, demonstrates the value of this approach for capturing the contemporary complexity of and transitions within diverse U.S. Latino families and communities. This book offers the most up-to-date portrait we have of Latinos in America today.

Catching A Case

Author: Tina Lee
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813576156
Size: 74.59 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Influenced by news reports of young children brutalized by their parents, most of us see the role of child services as the prevention of severe physical abuse. But as Tina Lee shows in Catching a Case, most child welfare cases revolve around often ill-founded charges of neglect, and the parents swept into the system are generally struggling but loving, fighting to raise their children in the face of crushing poverty, violent crime, poor housing, lack of childcare, and failing schools. Lee explored the child welfare system in New York City, observing family courts, interviewing parents and following them through the system, asking caseworkers for descriptions of their work and their decision-making processes, and discussing cases with attorneys on all sides. What she discovered about the system is troubling. Lee reveals that, in the face of draconian budget cuts and a political climate that blames the poor for their own poverty, child welfare practices have become punitive, focused on removing children from their families and on parental compliance with rules. Rather than provide needed help for families, case workers often hold parents to standards almost impossible for working-class and poor parents to meet. For instance, parents can be accused of neglect for providing inadequate childcare or housing even when they cannot afford anything better. In many cases, child welfare exacerbates family problems and sometimes drives parents further into poverty while the family court system does little to protect their rights. Catching a Case is a much-needed wake-up call to improve the child welfare system, and to offer more comprehensive social services that will allow all children to thrive.

Social Work Macro Practice

Author: F. Ellen Netting
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
ISBN: 9780205496075
Size: 36.37 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Social Work Macro Practicefocuses on work with organizations and communities, including planned change approaches and implementation. This new edition ofSocial Work Macro Practicehas been updated and revised to make it an even stronger and more user-friendly text. The authors have designed the book to mesh well with a variety of contemporary policy texts.

Nclb At The Crossroads

Author: Michael A. Rebell
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 9780807749449
Size: 33.83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This important new work from Rebell and Wolff, authors of the groundbreaking volume Moving Every Child Ahead: From NCLB Hype to Meaningful Educational Opportunity, brings together the nation's leading researchers and thinkers in the field of educational equity to provide a range of provocative critiques that go well beyond what has already been said on the subject of No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Unlike most books, this one puts aside political rhetoric and quick-fix solutions to tackle the truly difficult questions about how to ensure meaningful educational opportunities for all children.