Blame Welfare Ignore Poverty And Inequality

Author: Joel F. Handler
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139461168
Size: 68.49 MB
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With the passage of the 1996 welfare reform, not only welfare, but poverty and inequality have disappeared from the political discourse. The decline in the welfare rolls has been hailed as a success. This book challenges that assumption. It argues that while many single mothers left welfare, they have joined the working poor, and fail to make a decent living. The book examines the persistent demonization of poor single-mother families; the impact of the low-wage market on perpetuating poverty and inequality; and the role of the welfare bureaucracy in defining deserving and undeserving poor. It argues that the emphasis on family values - marriage promotion, sex education and abstinence - is misguided and diverts attention from the economic hardships low-income families face. The book proposes an alternative approach to reducing poverty and inequality that centers on a children's allowance as basic income support coupled with jobs and universal child care.

Child Poverty And Inequality

Author: Duncan Lindsey
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195305442
Size: 14.60 MB
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Duncan Lindsey shows in this volume that it is possible to provide true opportunity to all children, insuring them against a lifetime of inequality. When we do, the walls dividing the United States by race, ethnicity, and wealth will begin to crumble.

The Poverty And Education Reader

Author: Paul C. Gorski
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC.
ISBN: 1579228593
Size: 14.39 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The contributors to this book—teachers, students, parents, educational activists, and scholars—take on the prevalent deficit views of students and families in poverty. Rather than focusing on how to fix poor and working class youth, the contributors challenge us to acknowledge the ways these youth and their families are disenfranchised by educational policies and practices that deny them the opportunities enjoyed by their wealthier peers. Using a combination of brief, accessible essays, memoir, and poetry, the contributors to The Poverty and Education Reader bring to the fore the schooling experiences of poor and working class students, highlighting the tremendous resiliency, creativity, and educational aspirations of low-income families. It showcases proven strategies that imaginative teachers and schools have adopted for closing the opportunity gap. They do this by working in partnership with low-income families despite growing class sizes, the imposition of rote pedagogical models and teach-to-the-test mandates. This book addresses policy issues including, among many others, school funding, the problematic Teach for America Program, and other initiatives ostensibly meant to “help” low-income students. It also addresses the false promise of charter schools. Included are policies and practices that are known to work.

The Handbook Of Community Practice

Author: Marie Weil
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1452289972
Size: 72.28 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Second Edition of The Handbook of Community Practice is expanded and updated with a major global focus and serves as a comprehensive guidebook of community practice grounded in social justice and human rights. It utilizes community and practice theories and encompasses community development, organizing, planning, social change, policy practice, program development, service coordination, organizational cultural competency, and community-based research in relation to global poverty and community empowerment. This is also the first community practice text to provide combined and in-depth treatment of globalization and international development practice issues—including impacts on communities in the United States and on international development work. The Handbook is grounded in participatory and empowerment practices, including social change, social and economic development, feminist practice, community-collaborative, and engagement in diverse communities. It utilizes the social development perspective and employs analyses of persistent poverty, asset development, policy practice, and community research approaches as well as providing strategies for advocacy and social and legislative action. The handbook consists of forty chapters which challenge readers to examine and assess practice, theory, and research methods. As it expands on models and approaches, delineates emerging issues, and connects policy and practice, the book provides vision and strategies for local to global community practice in the coming decades. The handbook will continue to stand as the central text and reference for comprehensive community practice, and will be useful for years to come as it emphasizes direction for positive change, new developments in community approaches, and focuses attention on globalization, human rights, and social justice. It will continue to be used as a core text for multiple courses within programs, will have long term application for students of community practice, and will provide practitioners with new grounding for development, planning, organizing, and empowerment and social change work.

Policy Change Public Attitudes And Social Citizenship

Author: Humpage, Louise
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1447323513
Size: 80.70 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Neoliberal reforms have seen a radical shift in government thinking about social citizenship rights around the world. But have they had a similarly significant impact on public support for these rights? This unique book traces public views on social citizenship across three decades through attitudinal data from New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Australia. It argues that support for some aspects of social citizenship diminished more significantly under some political regimes than others, and that limited public resistance following the financial crisis of 2008-2009 further suggests the public ‘rolled over’ and accepted these neoliberal values. Yet attitudinal variances across different policy areas challenge the idea of an omnipotent neoliberalism, providing food for thought for academics, students and advocates wishing to galvanise support for social citizenship in the 21st century.

Social Policy And Citizenship

Author: Adalbert Evers
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199908575
Size: 31.55 MB
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In both Europe and America, the landscape of social policies has undergone fundamental changes in recent decades, especially in endeavors to develop new welfare arrangements. How does this affect citizenship-at-large as defined by the Marshallian triad of personal, democratic, and social rights? Taking nine European countries as case studies, the contributions analyze the ways that citizenship has changed in key areas such as social security, labor market policies, and social services. Other chapters concentrate on the theoretical and conceptual challenges that result from the interrelation of changing social policies with different notions of citizenship. Trends in welfare reform have become harder to interpret. They are no longer about simple reductions in social services and entitlements, or a decline in social citizenship; the terms of debate have shifted. In a postindustrial world, individuals are afforded more mobility, autonomy, and responsibility. Security is being reexamined in light of the new risks stemming from a worldwide knowledge-based economy. Behind the diversity of changes there is a unified agenda taking shape, characterized with concepts like activation, social investments, concerns with inclusion, and the strengthening of links between rights and responsibilities. The contributions in this volume represent an insightful look at the debate between the determination to curb social spending and a new model of an activist state ready to make social investments.

Black Girls And Adolescents Facing The Challenges

Author: Catherine Fisher Collins
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440830541
Size: 63.22 MB
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This one-of-a kind book challenges the current thinking about black girls to show how America has failed them—and what can be done to make their lives better. • Provides the first research work on this topic • Covers health (physical, mental, and sexual), education, crime/criminal justice, and parenting as they affect black teen girls and adolescents • Features contributors from a broad range of fields, including psychology, biology, criminal justice, sociology, spirituality, law, medicine, and popular culture • Examines characteristics of at-risk girls and the lure of the "bad girl" image • Clarifies what parents/mentors and others can do to help these girls and teens live happy, healthy, more rewarding lives

Latinos In American Society

Author: Ruth Enid Zambrana
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801461521
Size: 11.14 MB
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It is well known that Latinos in the United States bear a disproportionate burden of low educational attainment, high residential segregation, and low visibility in the national political landscape. In Latinos in American Society, Ruth Enid Zambrana brings together the latest research on Latinos in the United States to demonstrate how national origin, age, gender, socioeconomic status, and education affect the well-being of families and individuals. By mapping out how these factors result in economic, social, and political disadvantage, Zambrana challenges the widespread negative perceptions of Latinos in America and the single story of Latinos in the United States as a monolithic group. Synthesizing an increasingly substantial body of social science research-much of it emerging from the interdisciplinary fields of Chicano studies, U.S. Latino studies, critical race studies, and family studies-the author adopts an intersectional "social inequality lens" as a means for understanding the broader sociopolitical dynamics of the Latino family, considering ethnic subgroup diversity, community context, institutional practices, and their intersections with family processes and well-being. Zambrana, a leading expert on Latino populations in America, demonstrates the value of this approach for capturing the contemporary complexity of and transitions within diverse U.S. Latino families and communities. This book offers the most up-to-date portrait we have of Latinos in America today.