Black Like Me

Author: John Howard Griffin
Publisher: Wings Press
ISBN: 1609401085
Size: 35.89 MB
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This American classic has been corrected from the original manuscripts and indexed, featuring historic photographs and an extensive biographical afterword.

Black Like Me

Author: John Howard Griffin
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780451192035
Size: 57.99 MB
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This American classic has been corrected from the original manuscripts and indexed, featuring historic photographs and an extensive biographical afterword.

Man In The Mirror

Author: Robert Bonazzi
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781570751189
Size: 10.31 MB
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Describes the events that led a white American writer to darken his skin and live for a time as an African American in the Deep South

White Like Me

Author: Tim Wise
Publisher: Soft Skull Press
ISBN: 1593764707
Size: 72.17 MB
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With a new preface and updated chapters, White Like Me is one-part memoir, one-part polemical essay collection. It is a personal examination of the way in which racial privilege shapes the daily lives of white Americans in every realm: employment, education, housing, criminal justice, and elsewhere. Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise demonstrates the ways in which racism not only burdens people of color, but also benefits, in relative terms, those who are “white like him.” He discusses how racial privilege can harm whites in the long run and make progressive social change less likely. He explores the ways in which whites can challenge their unjust privileges, and explains in clear and convincing language why it is in the best interest of whites themselves to do so. Using anecdotes instead of stale statistics, Wise weaves a narrative that is at once readable and yet scholarly, analytical and yet accessible.

Black Like You

Author: John Strausbaugh
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781585425938
Size: 38.30 MB
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Presents an analysis of American racial attitudes as reflected by the historical practice of "blackface," exploring its past role in entertainment, its continuing impact, and its role as a symbol of positive advances in modern race relations.

Revival Black Marks Minority Ethnic Audiences And Media 2001

Author: Karen Ross
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 135175596X
Size: 69.59 MB
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This title was first published in 2001. This text brings together a collection of empirical studies focusing on the relationships which minority ethnic audiences have with and to media texts, both mainstream and minority. The media which comprise the focus for the essays include television, film, advertising, magazines and the press. The field of media studies has moved beyond the model of media consumer as passive recipient towards individuals and groups who are altogether more engaged, responsive and critical. But studies of the interactive media consumer often fail to consider the specific characteristics of "race" and ethnicity which come into play for minority ethnic audiences, and this book aims to add to the limited knowledge of the ways in which ethnic markers intervene in textual understanding and contestation.

Black Like Kyra White Like Me

Author: Judith Vigna
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1497683416
Size: 56.42 MB
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Kyra is Christy’s best friend from the youth center. Matt and Julie are Christy’s best friends on her block. When Kyra’s African-American family moves into Christy’s white neighborhood, Christy learns a hard lesson about prejudice.

Black For A Day

Author: Alisha Gaines
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469632845
Size: 54.86 MB
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In 1948, journalist Ray Sprigle traded his whiteness to live as a black man for four weeks. A little over a decade later, John Howard Griffin famously "became" black as well, traveling the American South in search of a certain kind of racial understanding. Contemporary history is littered with the surprisingly complex stories of white people passing as black, and here Alisha Gaines constructs a unique genealogy of "empathetic racial impersonation--white liberals walking in the fantasy of black skin under the alibi of cross-racial empathy. At the end of their experiments in "blackness," Gaines argues, these debatably well-meaning white impersonators arrived at little more than false consciousness. Complicating the histories of black-to-white passing and blackface minstrelsy, Gaines uses an interdisciplinary approach rooted in literary studies, race theory, and cultural studies to reveal these sometimes maddening, and often absurd, experiments of racial impersonation. By examining this history of modern racial impersonation, Gaines shows that there was, and still is, a faulty cultural logic that places enormous faith in the idea that empathy is all that white Americans need to make a significant difference in how to racially navigate our society.

Available Light

Author: John Howard Howard Griffin
Publisher: Wings Press
ISBN: 1609401115
Size: 68.37 MB
Format: PDF
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Culled from previously unpublished material, this collection of writing and photography by John Howard Griffin was taken from the period during which he was writing and revising what would be his most famous book, the bestselling "Black Like Me." Living in exile in Mexico at the time, along with his young family and aging parents, Griffin had been forced from his home town of Mansfield, Texas, by death threats from local white racists. Knowing that he would become a controversial public figure once he returned to the states, he kept an intimate journal of his ethical queries on racism and injustice--and to escape from his worries he also immersed himself in the culture of the Tarascan Indians of Michoacan. Accordingly, Robert Bonazzi's introduction contains substantial unpublished portions of the journals, and the main body of the book is made up of three essays by Griffin--one on photography and two about trips he made to photograph rural Mexico.

Drawing The Line

Author: Doreen Fowler
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813934001
Size: 54.96 MB
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In an original contribution to the psychoanalytic approach to literature, Doreen Fowler focuses on the fiction of four major American writers—William Faulkner, Richard Wright, Flannery O'Connor, and Toni Morrison—to examine the father's function as a "border figure." Although the father has most commonly been interpreted as the figure who introduces opposition and exclusion to the child, Fowler finds in these literary depictions fathers who instead support the construction of a social identity by mediating between cultural oppositions. Fowler counters the widely accepted notion that boundaries are solely sites of exclusion and offers a new theoretical model of boundary construction. She argues that boundaries are mysterious, dangerous, in-between places where a balance of sameness and difference makes differentiation possible. In the fiction of these southern writers, father figures introduce a separate cultural identity by modeling this mix of relatedness and difference. Fathers intervene in the mother-child relationship, but the father is also closely related to both mother and child. This model of boundary formation as a balance of exclusion and relatedness suggests a way to join with others in an inclusive, multicultural community and still retain ethnic, racial, and gender differences. Fowler's model for the father's mediating role in initiating gender, race, and other social differences shows not only how psychoanalytic theory can be used to interpret fiction and cultural history but also how literature and history can reshape theory.