Mormons And The Bible

Author: Philip L. Barlow
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019973903X
Size: 53.55 MB
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Philip L. Barlow analyzes the approaches taken to the Bible by key Mormon leaders, from founder Joseph Smith up to the present day. This edition includes an updated preface and bibliography.

Mormon History

Author: Ronald W. Walker
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252026195
Size: 11.45 MB
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A companion volume to their massive bibliography Studies in Mormon History, 1830-1997, this descriptive history by a team of top Mormon scholars provides a comprehensive view of how the writing of Mormon history has evolved since the establishment of the church. Mormon History offers an interpretive survey of Mormon historical writings, from the partisan and often ephemeral history of the nineteenth century through the shift in the first half of the twentieth toward a more balanced and professional approach to the "new Mormon history" that has emerged since World War II. In addition to laying out Mormon historiography, the authors examine Mormon biography and autobiography and discuss social science literature on the Mormons. Two valuable appendixes round out this volume, one on the development and nature of Mormon imprints, the other on conducting historical research in Mormon sources.

Mormonism A Historical Encyclopedia

Author: W. Paul Reeve
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1598841084
Size: 41.95 MB
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Covering its historic development, important individuals, and central ideas and issues, this encyclopedia offers broad historical coverage of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. • 140 entries on individuals, places, events, and issues • An overview section of six essays tracing the history of Mormonism from Joseph Smith's vision to years of global expansion that began in the mid-20th century • 50 contributors who are among the world's foremost scholars on the Mormon religion and its history • A chronology of Mormonism from its beginnings in upstate New York to its current status as a globalized church headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah • A bibliography of the latest scholarship on Mormon history

Lowell L Bennion

Author: Mary Lythgoe Bradford
Publisher: Dialogue Foundation
ISBN: 9781560850816
Size: 60.11 MB
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Lowell L. Bennion is legendary in many circles. An LDS institute instructor and professor of sociology at the University of Utah, he was never content simply to quantify social ills or to preach against them but actively set out to correct what he could. He founded and directed the Teton Valley Boys Ranch, served as executive director for the Salt Lake City Community Services Council, and organized other charities.His heart was with the underprivileged. He detested Pharisaism and often quoted biblical passages on the topic adapted to a Mormon ear: As your treading is upon the poor, ... I hate, I despise your f(ast) days, and I will not (dwell in) your solemn assemblies ... Take thou away from me the noise of thy songs; for I will not hear ... Woe unto them that are at ease in Zion. Bennion passed away in 1996 just after this biography was released, leaving an enormous void where he had been a beacon to humanitarian and liberation causes in his community.

Dialogue

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Size: 76.27 MB
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In Sacred Loneliness

Author: Todd Compton
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Size: 37.83 MB
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Beginning in the 1830s, at least thirty-three women married Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism. These were passionate relationships which also had some longevity, except in cases such as that of two young sisters, one of whom was discovered by Joseph's first wife, Emma, in a locked bedroom with the prophet. Emma remained a steadfast opponent of polygamy throughout her life. The majority of Smith's wives were younger than he, and one-third were between fourteen and twenty years of age. Another third were already married, and some of the husbands served as witnesses at their own wife's polyandrous wedding. In addition, some of the wives hinted that they bore Smith children--most notably Sylvia Sessions's daughter Josephine--although the children carried their stepfather's surname. For all of Smith's wives, the experience of being secretly married was socially isolating, emotionally draining, and sexually frustrating. Despite the spiritual and temporal benefits, which they acknowledged, they found their faith tested to the limit of its endurance. After Smith's death in 1844, their lives became even more "lonely and desolate." One even joined a convent. The majority were appropriated by Smith's successors, based on the Old Testament law of the Levirate, and had children by them, though they considered these guardianships unsatisfying. Others stayed in the Midwest and remarried, while one moved to California. But all considered their lives unhappy, except for the joy they found in their children and grandchildren.