Athens

Author: Niall Livingstone
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317293940
Size: 38.69 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5410
Download
The citizens of ancient Athens were directly responsible for the development and power of its democracy; but how did they learn about politics and what their roles were within it? In this volume Livingstone argues that learning about political praxis (how to be a citizen) was an integral part of the everyday life of ancient Athenians. In the streets, shops and other meeting-places of the city people from all levels of society, from slaves to the very wealthy, exchanged knowledge and competed for power and status. The City as University explores the spaces and occasions where Athenians practised the arts of citizenship for which they and their city became famous. In the agora and on the pnyx, Athenian democracy was about performance and oratory; but the written word opened the way to ever-increasing sophistication in both the practice and theory of politics. As the arts of spin proliferated, spontaneous live debate in which the speaker’s authority came from being one of the many remained a core democratic value. Livingstone explores how ideas of democratic leadership evolved from the poetry of the legendary law-giver Solon to the writings of the sophist Alcidamas of Elaia. The volume offers a new approach to the study of ancient education and will be an invaluable tool to students of ancient politics and culture, and to all those studying the history of democracy.

Childhood In Ancient Athens

Author: Lesley A. Beaumont
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136486690
Size: 65.75 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2037
Download
Childhood in Ancient Athens offers an in-depth study of children during the heyday of the Athenian city state, thereby illuminating a significant social group largely ignored by most ancient and modern authors alike. It concentrates not only on the child's own experience, but also examines the perceptions of children and childhood by Athenian society: these perceptions variously exhibit both similarities and stark contrasts with those of our own 21st century Western society. The study covers the juvenile life course from birth and infancy through early and later childhood, and treats these life stages according to the topics of nurture, play, education, work, cult and ritual, and death. In view of the scant ancient Greek literary evidence pertaining to childhood, Beaumont focuses on the more copious ancient visual representations of children in Athenian pot painting, sculpture, and terracotta modelling. Notably, this is the first full-length monograph in English to address the iconography of childhood in ancient Athens, and it breaks important new ground by rigorously analysing and evaluating classical art to reconstruct childhood’s social history. With over 120 illustrations, the book provides a rich visual, as well as narrative, resource for the history of childhood in classical antiquity.

Ancient Magic

Author: John Petropoulos
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780415282338
Size: 72.55 MB
Format: PDF
View: 1703
Download
Arranged chronologically with sections on ancient, Byzantine and modern Greece, this set of studies shows how magic provides a unifying theme through Greek history. As the contributors show, magic was, even in ancient times a private practice rather than part of the established public polis religion, and later chapters show how it was intertwined with Christian belief, whilst remaining largely outside the official realm of the church. Continuing belief in the evil eye forms the subject of the modern chapters. The final section is theoretical, seeking to define magic, particularly in relation to religion, and asking whether it is something which inevitably declines with technological and scientific advances.

Thinking The Greeks

Author: Bruce King
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781138671867
Size: 80.50 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5397
Download
This volume, from an international and interdisciplinary cohort of scholars, offers independent-minded essays about central Greek texts and about the relation of social theory and comparative method to the study of archaic and classical Greek literature. It is in honor of James M. Redfield, whose innovative and theoretically-informed work has been a touchstone for the contributors; it includes an Introduction that discusses Redfield's work, as well as a complete Bibliography of Redfield's scholarship. The volume is divided into three parts: on Homer, Plato and the genre of Socratic dialogue, and finally reception and transmission. An exploration of the dialectical relationship between literary genre and social form animates many of the essays. Drawing on work in anthropology, linguistics, sociology, art history, and philosophy, this volume offers ground-breaking perspectives on the study of Greek literature. It will be an invaluable resource to students and researchers alike.

Peace And Reconciliation In The Classical World

Author: E. P. Moloney
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317082869
Size: 16.70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5605
Download
Warfare has long been central to a proper understanding of ancient Greece and Rome, worlds where war was, as the philosopher Heraclitus observed, ‘both king and father of all’. More recently, however, the understanding of Classical antiquity solely in such terms has been challenged; it is recognised that while war was pervasive, and a key concern in the narratives of ancient historians, a concomitant desire for peace was also constant. This volume places peace in the prime position as a panel of scholars stresses the importance of ‘peace’ as a positive concept in the ancient world (and not just the absence of, or necessarily even related to, war), and considers examples of conflict resolution, conciliation, and concession from Homer to Augustine. Comparing and contrasting theories and practice across different periods and regions, this collection highlights, first, the open and dynamic nature of peace, and then seeks to review a wide variety of initiatives from across the Classical world.

Ancient Cities

Author: Charles Gates
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 113682328X
Size: 37.84 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2807
Download
Ancient Cities surveys the cities of the Ancient Near East, Egypt, and the Greek and Roman worlds from the perspectives of archaeology and architectural history, bringing to life the physical world of ancient city dwellers by concentrating on evidence recovered from archaeological excavations. Urban form is the focus: the physical appearance and overall plans of the cities, their architecture and natural topography, and the cultural and historical contexts in which they flourished. Attention is also paid to non-urban features such as religious sanctuaries and burial grounds, places and institutions that were a familiar part of the city dweller's experience. Objects or artifacts that represented the essential furnishings of everyday life are discussed, such as pottery, sculpture, wall paintings, mosaics and coins. Ancient Cities is unusual in presenting this wide range of Old World cultures in such comprehensive detail, giving equal weight to the Preclassical and Classical periods, and in showing the links between these ancient cultures. User-friendly features include: use of clear and accessible language, assuming no previous background knowledge lavishly illustrated with over 300 line drawings, maps, and photos historical summaries, further reading arranged by topic, plus a consolidated bibliography and comprehensive index new to the second edition: a companion website with an interactive timeline, chapter summaries, study questions, illustrations and a glossary of archaeological and historical terms. Visit the website at http://cw.routledge.com/textbooks/9780415498647/ In this second edition, Charles Gates has comprehensively revised and updated his original text, and Neslihan Yılmaz has reworked her acclaimed illustrations. Readers and lecturers will be delighted to see a new chapter on Phoenician cities in the first millennium BC, and new sections on Göbekli Tepe, the sensational Neolithic sanctuary; Sinope, a Greek city on the Black Sea coast; and cities of the western Roman Empire. With its comprehensive presentation of ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern cities, its rich collection of illustrations, and its new companion website, Ancient Cities will remain an essential textbook for university and high school students across a wide range of archaeology, ancient history, and ancient Near Eastern, Biblical, and classical studies courses.

Fourth Century Athens And The Hellenistic City

Author: Phillip Harding
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780415873925
Size: 11.14 MB
Format: PDF
View: 3268
Download
Most studies of fourth century Athens end with the battle of Khaironeia or with the death of Alexander, and while these may have been epochal points for other parts of Greece, neither was definitive for Athens. In Fourth Century Athens and the Hellenistic World, renowned historian of ancient Greece Philip Harding looks forward rather than back to illustrate how seamless was Athens’ transition into the Hellenistic world. Harding argues that it was the fourth-century, rather than the fifth, that eventually became the model for the Hellenistic city in government, diplomacy, education, taxation and administration of justice. Furthermore, it was Athens of the fourth century that provided the spiritual inspiration for Hellenistic culture. Whilst the spread of Hellenism to the east of Asia Minor and Egypt through the foundation of cities is rightly attributed to Alexander and his successors, Harding here argues for the recognition that Athens was truly the model for these new cities with implications for subsequent learning, religion, philosophy and rhetoric, literature and art.

Philostratus Interpreters And Interpretation

Author: Graeme Miles
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315415038
Size: 34.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 5456
Download
Philostratus is one of the greatest examples of the vitality and inventiveness of the Greek culture of his period, at once a one-man summation of contemporary tastes and interests and a strikingly individual re-inventor of the traditions in which he was steeped. This Roman-era engagement with the already classical past set important precedents for later understandings of classical art, literature and culture. This volume examines the ways in which the labyrinthine Corpus Philostrateum represents and interrogates the nature of interpretation and the interpreting subject. Taking ‘interpretation’ broadly as the production of meaning from objects that are considered to bear some less than obvious significance, it examines the very different interpreter figures presented: Apollonius of Tyana as interpreter of omens, dreams and art-works; an unnamed Vinetender and the dead Protesilaus as interpreters of heroes; and the sophist who emotively describes a gallery full of paintings, depicting in the process both the techniques of educated viewing and the various errors and illusions into which a viewer can fall.

Death And Disease In The Ancient City

Author: Valerie M. Hope
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415214278
Size: 19.74 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 7003
Download
First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Late Classical And Early Hellenistic Corinth

Author: Michael D. Dixon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317676491
Size: 58.67 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 342
Download
Late Classical and Early Hellenistic Corinth, 338-196 B.C. challenges the perception that the Macedonians' advent and continued presence in Corinth amounted to a loss of significance and autonomy. Immediately after Chaironeia, Philip II and his son Alexander III established close relations with Corinth and certain leading citizens on the basis of goodwill (eunoia). Mutual benefits and respect characterized their discourse throughout the remainder of the early Hellenistic period; this was neither a period of domination or decline, nor one in which the Macedonians deprived Corinthians of their autonomy. Instead, Corinth flourished while the Macedonians possessed the city. It was the site of a vast building program, much of which must be construed as the direct result of Macedonian patronage, evidence suggests strongly that those Corinthians who supported the Macedonians enjoyed great prosperity under them. Corinth's strategic location made it an integral part of the Macedonians' strategy to establish and maintain hegemony over the mainland Greek peninsula after Philip II's victory at Chaironeia. The Macedonian dynasts and kings who later possessed Corinth also valued its strategic position, and they regarded it as an essential component in their efforts to claim legitimacy due to its association with the Argead kings, Philip II and Alexander III the Great, and the League of Corinth they established. This study explicates the nature of the relationship between Corinthians and Macedonians that developed in the aftermath of Chaironeia, through the defeat at the battle of Kynoskephalai and the declaration of Greek Freedom at Isthmia in 196 B.C. Late Classical and Early Hellenistic Corinth is not simply the history of a single polis; it draws upon the extant literary, epigraphic, prosopographic, topographic, numismatic, architectural, and archaeological evidence to place Corinth within broader Hellenistic world. This volume, the full first treatment of the city in this period, contributes significantly to the growing body of scholarly literature focusing on the Hellenistic world and is a crucial resource for specialists in late Classical and early Hellenistic history.