Aristotle And The Rediscovery Of Citizenship

Author: Susan D. Collins
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139457039
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Aristotle and the Rediscovery of Citizenship confronts a question that is central to Aristotle's political philosophy as well as to contemporary political theory: what is a citizen? Answers prove to be elusive, in part because late twentieth-century critiques of the Enlightenment called into doubt fundamental tenets that once guided us. Engaging the two major works of Aristotle's political philosophy, his Nicomachean Ethics and his Politics, Susan D. Collins poses questions that current discussions of liberal citizenship do not adequately address. Drawing a path from contemporary disputes to Aristotle, she examines in detail his complex presentations of moral virtue, civic education, and law; his view of the aims and limits of the political community; and his treatment of the connection between citizenship and the human good. Collins thereby shows how Aristotle continues to be an indispensable source of enlightenment, as he has been for political and religious traditions of the past.

Aristotle S Politics

Author: Eugene Garver
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226284026
Size: 44.47 MB
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"Completes a trilogy on Aristotle: Aristotle's Rhetoric: an art of character (University of Chicago Press, 1994) and Confronting Aristotle's Ethics: ancient and modern morality (University of Chicago Press, 2006) were the first two books in the series"--Preliminaries.

Aristotle S Dialogue With Socrates

Author: Ronna Burger
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226080544
Size: 37.26 MB
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What is the good life for a human being? Aristotle’s exploration of this question in the Nicomachean Ethics has established it as a founding work of Western philosophy, though its teachings have long puzzled readers and provoked spirited discussion. Adopting a radically new point of view, Ronna Burger deciphers some of the most perplexing conundrums of this influential treatise by approaching it as Aristotle’s dialogue with the Platonic Socrates. Tracing the argument of the Ethics as it emerges through that approach, Burger’s careful reading shows how Aristotle represents ethical virtue from the perspective of those devoted to it while standing back to examine its assumptions and implications. “This is the best book I have read on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. It is so well crafted that reading it is like reading the Ethics itself, in that it provides an education in ethical matters that does justice to all sides of the issues.”—Mary P. Nichols, Baylor University

Aristotle S Politics

Author: Judith A. Swanson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1441164448
Size: 78.90 MB
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In the Politics, Aristotle sets out to discover what is the best form that the state can take. Similar to his mentor Plato, Aristotle considers the form that will produce justice and cultivate the highest human potential; however Aristotle takes a more empirical approach, examining the constitution of existing states and drawing on specific case-studies. In doing so he lays the foundations of modern political science.

Citizenship The History Of An Idea

Author: Paul Magnette
Publisher: ECPR Press
ISBN: 0954796659
Size: 34.12 MB
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Citizenship is the main axis of modern political legitimacy... But for all its evident centrality to modern politics, it would be quite wrong to assume that citizenship itself is well understood. "Paul Magnette's book offers an economical and illuminating guide through many of the elements which have gone into the intellectual and ideological history of modern citizenship. In doing so, he clearly surpasses any other recent analysis in any language known to me. This is a book to read closely and reflect on with the utmost care. It is our story; and to make a wiser future we must learn to understand it a great deal better. In that exacting and pressing task Paul Magnette's lucid and patient book offers nothing but help". John Dunn, University of Cambridge

Immigration And Citizenship In The Twenty First Century

Author: Noah M. Jedidiah Pickus
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780847692217
Size: 66.73 MB
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In this important book, a distinguished group of historians, political scientists, and legal experts explore three related issues: the Immigration and Naturalization Service's historic review of its citizenship evaluation, recent proposals to alter the oath of allegiance and the laws governing dual citizenship, and the changing rights and responsibilities of citizens and resident aliens in the United States. How Americans address these issues, the contributors argue, will shape broader debates about multiculturalism, civic virtue and national identity. The response will also determine how many immigrants become citizens and under what conditions, what these new citizens learn -- and teach -- about the meaning of American citizenship, and whether Americans regard newcomers as intruders or as fellow citizens with whom they share a common fate.

Making Good Citizens

Author: Diane Ravitch
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300099171
Size: 48.15 MB
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This volume brings together leading thinkers from a variety of disciplines to probe the relation between a healthy democracy and education. Their discussions cut across a range of important topics - the cultivation of democratic values, the formation of social capital in schools and communities, political conflict in a pluralist society, the place of religion in public life, the enduring problems of racial inequality.

The History Of The Renaissance World From The Rediscovery Of Aristotle To The Conquest Of Constantinople

Author: Susan Wise Bauer
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393240673
Size: 41.61 MB
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A lively and fascinating narrative history about the birth of the modern world. Beginning in the heady days just after the First Crusade, this volume—the third in the series that began with The History of the Ancient World and The History of the Medieval World—chronicles the contradictions of a world in transition. Popes continue to preach crusade, but the hope of a Christian empire comes to a bloody end at the walls of Constantinople. Aristotelian logic and Greek rationality blossom while the Inquisition gathers strength. As kings and emperors continue to insist on their divine rights, ordinary people all over the world seize power: the lingayats of India, the Jacquerie of France, the Red Turbans of China, and the peasants of England. New threats appear, as the Ottomans emerge from a tiny Turkish village and the Mongols ride out of the East to set the world on fire. New currencies are forged, new weapons invented, and world-changing catastrophes alter the landscape: the Little Ice Age and the Great Famine kill millions; the Black Death, millions more. In the chaos of these epoch-making events, our own world begins to take shape. Impressively researched and brilliantly told, The History of the Renaissance World offers not just the names, dates, and facts but the memorable characters who illuminate the years between 1100 and 1453—years that marked a sea change in mankind’s perception of the world.

Organization Society And Politics

Author: K. Morrell
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 113702688X
Size: 40.14 MB
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This thought-provoking book will appeal to both specialists and newcomers to Aristotle. Specialists will welcome the attention to original texts that underpin many of our ideas on politics, business studies, and other social sciences, whilst newcomers will appreciate the lucid summaries and applications that make Aristotle fascinatingly accessible.

The Cosmopolitan Constitution

Author: Alexander Somek
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191030929
Size: 66.23 MB
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Originally the constitution was expected to express and channel popular sovereignty. It was the work of freedom, springing from and facilitating collective self-determination. After the Second World War this perspective changed: the modern constitution owes its authority not only to collective authorship, it also must commit itself credibly to human rights. Thus people recede into the background, and the national constitution becomes embedded into one or other system of 'peer review' among nations. This is what Alexander Somek argues is the creation of the cosmopolitan constitution. Reconstructing what he considers to be the three stages in the development of constitutionalism, he argues that the cosmopolitan constitution is not a blueprint for the constitution beyond the nation state, let alone a constitution of the international community; rather, it stands for constitutional law reaching out beyond its national bounds. This cosmopolitan constitution has two faces: the first, political, face reflects the changed circumstances of constitutional authority. It conceives itself as constrained by international human rights protection, firmly committed to combating discrimination on the grounds of nationality, and to embracing strategies for managing its interaction with other sites of authority, such as the United Nations. The second, administrative, face of the cosmopolitan constitution reveals the demise of political authority, which has been traditionally vested in representative bodies. Political processes yield to various, and often informal, strategies of policy co-ordination so long as there are no reasons to fear that the elementary civil rights might be severely interfered with. It represents constitutional authority for an administered world.