An Open Internet For All

Author: Dana D. Bagwell
Publisher: Lfb Scholarly Pub Llc
ISBN: 9781593325213
Size: 26.50 MB
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"Network neutrality is one of the most contested issues in communications law today. Those in opposition maintain thtat the rights of network owners are at stake. Supporters argue that the Internet's open architecture is at risk as are the rights of Internet users to freely publish and access information. Despite this connection to free speech, up to this point there has been little discussion about the First Amendment implications of network neutrality. Using the idea of a right of access to the media, Bagwell uncovers legal precedent that would give First Amendment support to network neutrality rules"--Provided by publisher.

Virtual Freedom

Author: Dawn C. Nunziato
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804772452
Size: 53.55 MB
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Communications giants like Google, Comcast, and AT&T enjoy increasingly unchecked control over speech. As providers of broadband access and Internet search engines, they can control online expression. Their online content restrictions—from obstructing e-mail to censoring cablecasts—are considered legal because of recent changes in free speech law. In this book, Dawn Nunziato criticizes recent changes in free speech law in which only the government need refrain from censoring speech, while companies are permitted to self-regulate. By enabling Internet providers to exercise control over content, the Supreme Court and the FCC have failed to protect the public's right to access a broad diversity of content. Nunziato argues that regulation is necessary to ensure the free flow of information and to render the First Amendment meaningful in the twenty-first century. This book offers an urgent call to action, recommending immediate steps to preserve our free speech rights online.

Freedom Of Connection Freedom Of Expression

Author:
Publisher: UNESCO
ISBN: 9231041886
Size: 24.67 MB
Format: PDF
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As this publication explains, freedom of expression is not just a by-product of technical change; it must be protected by legal and regulatory measures that balance a variety of potentially conflicting values and interests in a complex global ecology of choices. The impetus that this report provides for the prioritization of research in this field encourages further scrutiny of the multifaceted issues that govern the conditions for freedom of expression on the Internet. The findings of this research point to the need to better track a wider array of global, legal and regulatory trends. It is my hope that this publication proves to be a useful and informative resource for all users working in this domain, whether individual researchers, students or policy makers.

Who Controls The Internet

Author: Jack Goldsmith
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198034803
Size: 78.19 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Is the Internet erasing national borders? Will the future of the Net be set by Internet engineers, rogue programmers, the United Nations, or powerful countries? Who's really in control of what's happening on the Net? In this provocative new book, Jack Goldsmith and Tim Wu tell the fascinating story of the Internet's challenge to governmental rule in the 1990s, and the ensuing battles with governments around the world. It's a book about the fate of one idea--that the Internet might liberate us forever from government, borders, and even our physical selves. We learn of Google's struggles with the French government and Yahoo's capitulation to the Chinese regime; of how the European Union sets privacy standards on the Net for the entire world; and of eBay's struggles with fraud and how it slowly learned to trust the FBI. In a decade of events the original vision is uprooted, as governments time and time again assert their power to direct the future of the Internet. The destiny of the Internet over the next decades, argue Goldsmith and Wu, will reflect the interests of powerful nations and the conflicts within and between them. While acknowledging the many attractions of the earliest visions of the Internet, the authors describe the new order, and speaking to both its surprising virtues and unavoidable vices. Far from destroying the Internet, the experience of the last decade has lead to a quiet rediscovery of some of the oldest functions and justifications for territorial government. While territorial governments have unavoidable problems, it has proven hard to replace what legitimacy governments have, and harder yet to replace the system of rule of law that controls the unchecked evils of anarchy. While the Net will change some of the ways that territorial states govern, it will not diminish the oldest and most fundamental roles of government and challenges of governance. Well written and filled with fascinating examples, including colorful portraits of many key players in Internet history, this is a work that is bound to stir heated debate in the cyberspace community.

Why Net Neutrality Matters

Author: Committee on the Judiciary United States
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781547105939
Size: 69.86 MB
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The FCC is in the process of considering whether to adopt rules that would regulate the Internet. The rules the FCC is now considering will shape the Internet ecosystem for many years to come and could have a profound effect on the U.S. economy, place in the world and ultimately on the nature of society. The Internet we know is the direct result of two key characteristics. First, the Internet separates applications from infrastructure, making it possible to create a networked application without knowing anything about the underlying network. Second, every applications is immediately available to every consumer. These two characteristics radically lowered the cost of building and distributing Internet applications, opening the market to a much larger and more diverse pool of creators. For the first time, people without money, connections, or corporate backing could create an application and reach a global audience. Until recently, Internet access providers could not tell if you were watching Netflix, playing Angry Birds, or posting on Facebook. By default, access to the Internet was open. They have now deployed technology that allows them to see what services you are using. This will make it possible for the cable and telephone companies we use to get to the Internet to charge application developers for faster delivery of packets, slow traffic they decide is less important and even block traffic altogether. The Internet has remained a relatively level playing field because of a combination of FCC enforcement actions and Comcast's acceptance of net neutrality principles as a condition of their merger with NBC. Today, those agreements are nearing expiration, and the FCC's ability to enforce open Internet principles has been sharply curtailed by the DC Circuit Court's decision in the Verizon case.

The Master Switch

Author: Tim Wu
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307594653
Size: 37.32 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A New Yorker and Fortune Best Book of the Year Analyzing the strategic maneuvers of today’s great information powers–Apple, Google, and an eerily resurgent AT&T–Tim Wu uncovers a time-honored pattern in which invention begets industry and industry begets empire. It is easy to forget that every development in the history of the American information industry–from the telephone to radio to film–once existed in an open and chaotic marketplace inhabited by entrepreneurs and utopians, just as the Internet does today. Each of these, however, grew to be dominated by a monopolist or cartel. In this pathbreaking book, Tim Wu asks: will the Internet follow the same fate? Could the Web–the entire flow of American information–come to be ruled by a corporate leviathan in possession of "the master switch"? Here, Tim Wu shows how a battle royale for Internet’s future is brewing, and this is one war we dare not tune out.

Internet Architecture And Innovation

Author: Barbara van Schewick
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262265575
Size: 61.59 MB
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Today -- following housing bubbles, bank collapses, and high unemployment -- the Internet remains the most reliable mechanism for fostering innovation and creating new wealth. The Internet's remarkable growth has been fueled by innovation. In this pathbreaking book, Barbara van Schewick argues that this explosion of innovation is not an accident, but a consequence of the Internet's architecture -- a consequence of technical choices regarding the Internet's inner structure that were made early in its history.The Internet's original architecture was based on four design principles: modularity, layering, and two versions of the celebrated but often misunderstood end-to-end arguments. But today, the Internet's architecture is changing in ways that deviate from the Internet's original design principles, removing the features that have fostered innovation and threatening the Internet's ability to spur economic growth, to improve democratic discourse, and to provide a decentralized environment for social and cultural interaction in which anyone can participate. If no one intervenes, network providers' interests will drive networks further away from the original design principles. If the Internet's value for society is to be preserved, van Schewick argues, policymakers will have to intervene and protect the features that were at the core of the Internet's success.

Freedom For The Thought That We Hate

Author: Anthony Lewis
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465012930
Size: 35.24 MB
Format: PDF
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More than any other people on earth, we Americans are free to say and write what we think. The press can air the secrets of government, the corporate boardroom, or the bedroom with little fear of punishment or penalty. This extraordinary freedom results not from America's culture of tolerance, but from fourteen words in the constitution: the free expression clauses of the First Amendment. In Freedom for the Thought That We Hate, two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Anthony Lewis describes how our free-speech rights were created in five distinct areas—political speech, artistic expression, libel, commercial speech, and unusual forms of expression such as T-shirts and campaign spending. It is a story of hard choices, heroic judges, and the fascinating and eccentric defendants who forced the legal system to come face to face with one of America's great founding ideas.