Amusing The Million

Author: John F. Kasson
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1429952237
Size: 44.96 MB
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Coney Island: the name still resonates with a sense of racy Brooklyn excitement, the echo of beach-front popular entertainment before World War I. Amusing the Million examines the historical context in which Coney Island made its reputation as an amusement park and shows how America's changing social and economic conditions formed the basis of a new mass culture. Exploring it afresh in this way, John Kasson shows Coney Island no longer as the object of nostalgia but as a harbinger of modernity--and the many photographs, lithographs, engravings, and other reproductions with which he amplifies his text support this lively thesis.

Amusing The Million

Author: John F. Kasson
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 9780809001330
Size: 63.17 MB
Format: PDF
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Coney Island: the name still resonates with a sense of racy Brooklyn excitement, the echo of beach-front popular entertainment before World War I. Amusing the Million examines the historical context in which Coney Island made its reputation as an amusement park and shows how America's changing social and economic conditions formed the basis of a new mass culture. Exploring it afresh in this way, John Kasson shows Coney Island no longer as the object of nostalgia but as a harbinger of modernity--and the many photographs, lithographs, engravings, and other reproductions with which he amplifies his text support this lively thesis.

Amusing The Million

Author: John F. Kasson
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0809026171
Size: 48.74 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Coney Island: the name still resonates with a sense of racy Brooklyn excitement, the echo of beach-front popular entertainment before World War I. "Amusing the Million" examines the historical context in which Coney Island made its reputation as an amusement park and shows how America's changing social and economic conditions formed the basis of a new mass culture. Exploring it afresh in this way, John Kasson shows Coney Island no longer as the object of nostalgia but as a harbinger of modernity--and the many photographs, lithographs, engravings, and other reproductions with which he amplifies his text support this lively thesis.

Kodak And The Lens Of Nostalgia

Author: Nancy Martha West
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813919591
Size: 38.42 MB
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The advertising campaigns launched by Kodak in the early years of snapshot photography stand at the center of a shift in American domestic life that goes deeper than technological innovations in cameras and film. Before the advent of Kodak advertising in 1888, writes Nancy Martha West, Americans were much more willing to allow sorrow into the space of the domestic photograph, as evidenced by the popularity of postmortem photography in the mid-nineteenth century. Through the taking of snapshots, Kodak taught Americans to see their experiences as objects of nostalgia, to arrange their lives in such a way that painful or unpleasant aspects were systematically erased. West looks at a wide assortment of Kodak's most popular inventions and marketing strategies, including the "Kodak Girl," the momentous invention of the Brownie camera in 1900, the "Story Campaign" during World War I, and even the Vanity Kodak Ensemble, a camera introduced in 1926 that came fully equipped with lipstick. At the beginning of its campaign, Kodak advertising primarily sold the fun of taking pictures. Ads from this period celebrate the sheer pleasure of snapshot photography--the delight of handling a diminutive camera, of not worrying about developing and printing, of capturing subjects in candid moments. But after 1900, a crucial shift began to take place in the company's marketing strategy. The preservation of domestic memories became Kodak's most important mission. With the introduction of the Brownie camera at the turn of the century, the importance of home began to replace leisure activity as the subject of ads, and at the end of World War I, Americans seemed desperately to need photographs to confirm familial unity. By 1932, Kodak had become so intoxicated with the power of its own marketing that it came up with the most bizarre idea of all, the "Death Campaign." Initiated but never published, this campaign based on pictures of dead loved ones brought Kodak advertising full circle. Having launched one of the most successful campaigns in advertising history, the company did not seem to notice that selling a painful subject might be more difficult than selling momentary pleasure or nostalgia. Enhanced with over 50 reproductions of the ads themselves, 16 of them in color, Kodak and the Lens of Nostalgia vividly illustrates the fundamental changes in American culture and the function of memory in the formative years of the twentieth century.

Inside The Minstrel Mask

Author: Annemarie Bean
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 9780819563002
Size: 78.19 MB
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A sourcebook of contemporary and historical commentary on America's first popular mass entertainment.

Major Problems In American Popular Culture

Author: Kathleen Franz
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1133417175
Size: 27.19 MB
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MAJOR PROBLEMS IN AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE follows the highly successful Major Problems format. Each chapter comprises essays and documents that focus on a particular aspect of American popular culture. These essays and documents will prompt students to think about the centrality of popular culture in American life and its powerful role in forging identity, historical memory, and relationships among consumers, producers, citizens, and the state. They reinforce the idea that popular culture is the ground on which cultural and social transformations are worked. Race and class are at the center of the analysis, and these categories, along with gender and nationalism, thread through the chapters. They all argue for seeing popular audiences as active creators rather than passive receivers of popular culture. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Female Spectacle

Author: Susan A. Glenn
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674037669
Size: 59.31 MB
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When the French actress Sarah Bernhardt made her first American tour in 1880, the term "feminism" had not yet entered our national vocabulary. But over the course of the next half-century, a rising generation of daring actresses and comics brought a new kind of woman to center stage. Exploring and exploiting modern fantasies and fears about female roles and gender identity, these performers eschewed theatrical convention and traditional notions of womanly modesty. They created powerful images of themselves as ambitious, independent, and sexually expressive "New Women." "Female Spectacle" reveals the theater to have been a powerful new source of cultural authority and visibility for women. Ironically, theater also provided an arena in which producers and audiences projected the uncertainties and hostilities that accompanied changing gender relations. From Bernhardt's modern methods of self-promotion to Emma Goldman's political theatrics, from the female mimics and Salome dancers to the upwardly striving chorus girl, Glenn shows us how and why theater mattered to women and argues for its pivotal role in the emergence of modern feminism.

Silent Film And The Triumph Of The American Myth

Author: Paula Marantz Cohen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195343883
Size: 63.45 MB
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Silent Film and the Triumph of the American Myth connects the rise of film and the rise of America as a cultural center and twentieth-century world power. Silent film, Paula Cohen reveals, allowed America to sever its literary and linguistic ties to Europe and answer the call by nineteenth-century writers like Emerson, Thoreau and Whitman for an original form of expression compatible with American strengths and weaknesses. When film finally began to talk in 1927, the medium had already done its work. It had helped translate representation into a dynamic visual form and had "Americanized" the world. Cohen explores the way film emerged as an American medium through its synthesis of three basic elements: the body, the landscape, and the face. Nineteenth-century American culture had already charged these elements with meaning--the body through vaudeville and burlesque, landscape through landscape painting and moving panoramas, and the face through portrait photography. Integrating these popular forms, silent film also developed genres that showcased each of its basic elements: the body in comedy, the landscape in the western, and the face in melodrama. At the same time, it helped produce a new idea of character, embodied in the American movie star. Cohen's book offers a fascinating new perspective on American cultural history. It shows how nineteenth-century literature can be said to anticipate twentieth-century film--how Douglas Fairbanks was, in a sense, successor to Walt Whitman. And rather than condemning the culture of celebrity and consumption that early Hollywood helped inspire, the book highlights the creative and democratic features of the silent-film ethos. Just as notable, Cohen champions the concept of the "American myth" in the wake of recent attempts to discredit it. She maintains that American silent film helped consolidate and promote a myth of possibility and self-making that continues to dominate the public imagination and stands behind the best impulses of our contemporary world.

Coney Island

Author: Charles Denson
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781580084550
Size: 26.15 MB
Format: PDF
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Growing up on Coney Island in the '�?50s and '�?60s, Charles Denson experienced legendary amusements and attractions like the Cyclone and Thunderbolt roller coasters, the Parachute Jump, and Steeplechase Park. In CONEY ISLAND: LOST AND FOUND, Denson gives us an insider'�?s look at one of New York'�?s best-known neighborhoods, weaving together memories of his childhood adventures with colorful stories of the area'�?s past and interviews with local personalities, all brought to life by hundreds of photographs, detailed maps, and authentic memorabilia. CONEY ISLAND is a heartfelt chronicle that stretches from colonial times to the island'�?s heyday in the early 20th century and through its subsequent decline and revival, culminating in the 2001 opening of the new ballpark that brought baseball back to Brooklyn.,Ģ Features 300 color and black-and-white photographs, including many never-before-published images.,Ģ Detailed hand-drawn maps trace a century of amusement park history.,Ģ Includes posters, programs, and tickets from past and present.Reviews"Evocative."-Newark Star-LedgerRecommended in "New York Bookshelf, Nonfiction" -New York Times"Charles Denson traces CONEY ISLAND . . . in all its glory." -Birmingham News"[A] crisply researched and tenderly rendered love letter." - St. Petersburg Times"Many delightful details assembled in the thoughtful and handsome" volume." -San Francisco Chronicle"Denson'�?s CONEY ISLAND is a well-researched, passionate account of his neighborhood's decline and rebirth is an invaluable addition . . . to American history." -New York'�?s City Limits