American Nations

Author: Colin Woodard
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101544457
Size: 35.86 MB
Format: PDF
View: 7302
Download
An illuminating history of North America's eleven rival cultural regions that explodes the red state-blue state myth. North America was settled by people with distinct religious, political, and ethnographic characteristics, creating regional cultures that have been at odds with one another ever since. Subsequent immigrants didn't confront or assimilate into an “American” or “Canadian” culture, but rather into one of the eleven distinct regional ones that spread over the continent each staking out mutually exclusive territory. In American Nations, Colin Woodard leads us on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, and the rivalries and alliances between its component nations, which conform to neither state nor international boundaries. He illustrates and explains why “American” values vary sharply from one region to another. Woodard (author of American Character: A History of the Epic Struggle Between Individual Liberty and the Common Good) reveals how intranational differences have played a pivotal role at every point in the continent's history, from the American Revolution and the Civil War to the tumultuous sixties and the "blue county/red county" maps of recent presidential elections. American Nations is a revolutionary and revelatory take on America's myriad identities and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and are molding our future. From the Hardcover edition.

American Nations

Author: Colin Woodard
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781101540787
Size: 75.50 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6465
Download
The author describes eleven rival regional "nations" in the United States (Yankeedom, New Netherland, the Midlands, Tidewater, Greater Appalachia, the Deep South, New France, El Norte, the Left Coast, the Far West, and First Nation), and how these deep roots continue to influence our politics today.

American Nations

Author: Colin Woodard
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780670022960
Size: 38.29 MB
Format: PDF
View: 1709
Download
A history of North America's 11 rival cultural regions challenges popular perceptions about the red state-blue state conflict, tracing lingering tensions stemming from disparate intranational values that have shaped every major event in history. By the author of Ocean's End. 25,000 first printing.

The Nine Nations Of North America

Author: Joel Garreau
Publisher: Avon Books
ISBN:
Size: 44.38 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5289
Download
Divides North America into nine powers, and explains the cultural, ethnic, and geographic identities of each

American Nations

Author: Frederick E. Hoxie
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415927505
Size: 44.70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 3334
Download
Twenty-three essays by academics consider the historical, cultural, religious and political circumstances of various Native American peoples.

A Nation Of Nations

Author: Tom Gjelten
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 147674386X
Size: 53.54 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5268
Download
"The dramatic and compelling story of the transformation of America during the last fifty years, told through a handful of families in one suburban county in Virginia that has been utterly changed by recent immigration. In the fifty years since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, the foreign-born population of the United States has tripled. Significantly, these immigrants are not coming from Europe, as was the case before 1965, but from all corners of the globe. Today non-European immigration is ninety percent of the total immigration to the US. Americans today are vastly more diverse than ever. They look different, speak different languages, practice different religions, eat different foods, and enjoy different cultures. In 1950, Fairfax County, Virginia, was ninety percent white, ten percent African-American, with a little more than one hundred families who were 'other.' Currently the African-American percentage of the population is about the same, but the Anglo white population is less than fifty percent, and there are families of Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and Latin American origin living all over the county. A Nation of Nations follows the lives of a few immigrants to Fairfax County over recent decades as they gradually 'Americanize.' Hailing from Korea, Bolivia, and Libya, these families have stories that illustrate common immigrant themes: friction between minorities, economic competition and entrepreneurship, and racial and cultural stereotyping. It's been half a century since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act changed the landscape of America, and no book has assessed the impact or importance of this law as this one does, with its brilliant combination of personal stories and larger demographic and political issues."--Publisher information.

Nation To Nation

Author: Suzan Shown Harjo
Publisher: Smithsonian Institution
ISBN: 1588344797
Size: 48.25 MB
Format: PDF
View: 7128
Download
Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indians explores the promises, diplomacy, and betrayals involved in treaties and treaty making between the United States government and Native Nations. One side sought to own the riches of North America and the other struggled to hold on to traditional homelands and ways of life. The book reveals how the ideas of honor, fair dealings, good faith, rule of law, and peaceful relations between nations have been tested and challenged in historical and modern times. The book consistently demonstrates how and why centuries-old treaties remain living, relevant documents for both Natives and non-Natives in the 21st century.

American Character

Author: Colin Woodard
Publisher: Viking Adult
ISBN: 0525427899
Size: 26.71 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5671
Download
The struggle between individualism and the good of the community as a whole has been the basis of every major disagreement in America's history, from the debates at the Constitutional Convention to the civil rights movement to the Tea Party. In American Character, Colin Woodard traces these two key strands in American politics through the four centuries of the nation's existence, from the first colonies through the Gilded Age and Great Depression to the present day, and how different regions of the country have successfully or disastrously accommodated them.

Why Latin American Nations Fail

Author: Matías Vernengo
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520290305
Size: 80.78 MB
Format: PDF
View: 255
Download
The question of development is a major topic in courses across the social sciences and history, particularly those focused on Latin America. Many scholars and instructors have tried to pinpoint, explain, and define the problem of underdevelopment in the region. With new ideas have come new strategies that by and large have failed to explain or reduce income disparity and relieve poverty in the region. Why Latin American Nations Fail brings together leading Latin Americanists from several disciplines to address the topic of how and why contemporary development strategies have failed to curb rampant poverty and underdevelopment throughout the region. Given the dramatic political turns in contemporary Latin America, this book offers a much-needed explanation and analysis of the factors that are key to making sense of development today.

Indian Nations Of North America

Author: Anton Treuer
Publisher: National Geographic Books
ISBN: 9781426206641
Size: 47.25 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5233
Download
Categorized into eight geographical regions, this encyclopedic reference examines the history, beliefs, traditions, languages, and lifestyles of indigenous peoples of North America.