American Character

Author: Colin Woodard
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143110004
Size: 71.98 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 7470
Download
"Explores the ongoing debates throughout history between the fight for individual rights and the community as a whole, from discussions that took place at the Constitutional Convention, through the Civil War, all the way up to the modern Tea Party"--NoveList.

A Nation Of Victims

Author: Charles J. Sykes
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312098827
Size: 78.94 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 675
Download
A look at "victimism" in the United States criticizes the ways in which individuals define themselves by their status as victims--of parents, men, the workplace, stress, drugs, food, and physical characteristics

Tocqueville On American Character

Author: Michael A. Ledeen
Publisher: Truman Talley Books
ISBN: 0312274513
Size: 24.79 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4060
Download
In 1831, Alexis De Tocqueville, a twenty-six-year-old French aristocrat, spent nine months travelling across the United States. From the East Coast to the frontier, from the Canadian border to New Orleans, Tocqueville observed the American people and the revolutionary country they'd created. His celebrated Democracy in America, the most quoted work on America ever written, presented the new Americans with a degree of understanding no one had accomplished before or has since. Astonished at the pace of daily life and stimulated by people at all levels of society, Tocqueville recognized that Americans were driven by a series of internal conflicts: simultaneously religious and materialistic; individualistic and yet deeply involved in community affairs; isolationist and interventionist; pragmatic and ideological. Noted author Michael Ledeen takes a fresh look at Tocqueville's insights into our national psyche and asks whether Americans' national character, which Tocqueville believed to be wholly admirable, has fallen into moral decay and religious indifference. Michael Ledeen's sparkling new exploration has some surprising answers and provides a lively new look at a time when character is at the center of our national debate.

The Book Of Unknown Americans

Author: Cristina Henríquez
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0385350856
Size: 15.37 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 4627
Download
“A triumph of storytelling. Henríquez pulls us into the lives of her characters with such mastery that we hang on to them just as fiercely as they hang on to one another and their dreams. This passionate, powerful novel will stay with you long after you’ve turned the final page.” —Ben Fountain, author of Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk A boy and a girl who fall in love. Two families whose hopes collide with destiny. An extraordinary novel that offers a resonant new definition of what it means to be American. Arturo and Alma Rivera have lived their whole lives in Mexico. One day, their beautiful fifteen-year-old daughter, Maribel, sustains a terrible injury, one that casts doubt on whether she’ll ever be the same. And so, leaving all they have behind, the Riveras come to America with a single dream: that in this country of great opportunity and resources, Maribel can get better. When Mayor Toro, whose family is from Panama, sees Maribel in a Dollar Tree store, it is love at first sight. It’s also the beginning of a friendship between the Rivera and Toro families, whose web of guilt and love and responsibility is at this novel’s core. Woven into their stories are the testimonials of men and women who have come to the United States from all over Latin America. Their journeys and their voices will inspire you, surprise you, and break your heart. Suspenseful, wry and immediate, rich in spirit and humanity, The Book of Unknown Americans is a work of rare force and originality. This eBook edition includes a Reading Group Guide.

American Character

Author: Mark Thompson
Publisher: Arcade Publishing
ISBN: 9781559705509
Size: 56.48 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 4080
Download
The life of Western maverick Charles Fletcher Lummis is laid bare in this entertaining biography of the journalist, photographer, poet, and Native American rights advocate who spent most of his life fighting injustice in the West. 25,000 first printing.

People Of Plenty

Author: David M. Potter
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226676319
Size: 46.21 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 4568
Download
America has long been famous as a land of plenty, but we seldom realize how much the American people are a people of plenty—a people whose distinctive character has been shaped by economic abundance. In this important book, David M. Potter breaks new ground both in the study of this phenomenon and in his approach to the question of national character. He brings a fresh historical perspective to bear on the vital work done in this field by anthropologists, social psychologists, and psychoanalysts. "The rejection of hindsight, with the insistence on trying to see events from the point of view of the participants, was a governing theme with Potter. . . . This sounds like a truism. Watching him apply it however, is a revelation."—Walter Clemons, Newsweek "The best short book on national character I have seen . . . broadly based, closely reasoned, and lucidly written."—Karl W. Deutsch, Yale Review

American Nations

Author: Colin Woodard
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101544457
Size: 18.68 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1730
Download
An illuminating history of North America's eleven rival cultural regions that explodes the red state-blue state myth. North America was settled by people with distinct religious, political, and ethnographic characteristics, creating regional cultures that have been at odds with one another ever since. Subsequent immigrants didn't confront or assimilate into an “American” or “Canadian” culture, but rather into one of the eleven distinct regional ones that spread over the continent each staking out mutually exclusive territory. In American Nations, Colin Woodard leads us on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, and the rivalries and alliances between its component nations, which conform to neither state nor international boundaries. He illustrates and explains why “American” values vary sharply from one region to another. Woodard (author of American Character: A History of the Epic Struggle Between Individual Liberty and the Common Good) reveals how intranational differences have played a pivotal role at every point in the continent's history, from the American Revolution and the Civil War to the tumultuous sixties and the "blue county/red county" maps of recent presidential elections. American Nations is a revolutionary and revelatory take on America's myriad identities and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and are molding our future. From the Hardcover edition.

Shaping The American Character The Significance Of The Frontier In American History

Author: Frederick Jackson Turner
Publisher: Now and Then Reader LLC
ISBN: 1937853101
Size: 40.82 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6762
Download
More than a hundred years after it was first articulated, Frederick Jackson Turner's "frontier thesis" remains one of the key interpretations of American history. Turner argued that the European heritage of Americans was less important in understanding the country they had made than their own experience in settling a continent. It was the circumstances of life on the frontierin fact a succession of frontiers that moved inexorably westwardthat were a determining influence on American character and institutions. Turner read this paper propounding his thesis at the meeting of the American Historical Association in Chicago, July 12, 1893, as part of the World's Columbian Exposition. It was timely, he suggested, because the Census of 1890 had announced the closing of the frontier in the United States and thus the end of an important stage of American development.