African American Women S Rhetoric

Author: Deborah F. Atwater
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739121764
Size: 75.87 MB
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African American Women's Rhetoric is a comprehensive study of the ways in which African American women in politics, education, business, and other social contexts have tried to persuade their audiences to value what they say and who they are. Through detailed examinations of the rhetoric of a variety of women in important periods in American history, Deborah Atwater reveals that African American women today who engage in speech in the public sphere (such as Condoleezza Rice, Barbara Jordan, and others) stem from an important lineage of active, outspoken women.

Race And Reconciliation

Author: John B. Hatch
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780739121535
Size: 58.39 MB
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Hatch develops a robust rhetorical theory of reconciliation and applies it to contemporary national and global efforts to redress the racialized wounds and injustices created by slavery. What emerges from this work is a profound vision for the prospects of meaningful reparation, forgiveness, and reconciliation in American race relations.

A Century Of Communication Studies

Author: Pat J. Gehrke
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134062796
Size: 23.24 MB
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This volume chronicles the development of communication studies as a discipline, providing a history of the field and identifying opportunities for future growth. Editors Pat J. Gehrke and William M. Keith have assembled an exceptional list of communication scholars who, in the thirteen chapters contained in this book, cover the breadth and depth of the field. Organized around themes and concepts that have enduring historical significance and wide appeal across numerous subfields of communication, A Century of Communication Studies bridges research and pedagogy, addressing themes that connect classroom practice and publication. Published in the 100th anniversary year of the National Communication Association, this collection highlights the evolution of communication studies and will serve future generations of scholars as a window into not only our past but also the field’s collective possibilities.

The Interpretation Of Cultures

Author: Clifford Geertz
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465093566
Size: 41.27 MB
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In The Interpretation of Cultures, the most original anthropologist of his generation moved far beyond the traditional confines of his discipline to develop an important new concept of culture. This groundbreaking book, winner of the 1974 Sorokin Award of the American Sociological Association, helped define for an entire generation of anthropologists what their field is ultimately about.

Unequal Freedom

Author: Evelyn Nakano GLENN
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674037649
Size: 42.29 MB
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The inequalities that persist in America have deep historical roots. Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War II. During this era the country experienced enormous social and economic changes with the abolition of slavery, rapid territorial expansion, and massive immigration, and struggled over the meaning of free labor and the essence of citizenship as people who previously had been excluded sought the promise of economic freedom and full political rights. After a lucid overview of the concepts of the free worker and the independent citizen at the national level, Glenn vividly details how race and gender issues framed the struggle over labor and citizenship rights at the local level between blacks and whites in the South, Mexicans and Anglos in the Southwest, and Asians and haoles (the white planter class) in Hawaii. She illuminates the complex interplay of local and national forces in American society and provides a dynamic view of how labor and citizenship were defined, enforced, and contested in a formative era for white-nonwhite relations in America.

Rhetoric And Resistance In Black Women S Autobiography

Author: Johnnie M. Stover
Publisher: Orange Groove Books
ISBN: 9781616101350
Size: 50.79 MB
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Johnnie M. Stover explores the origin and power of black women writers' voices using the personal narratives of 19th-century Americans who were slaves or indentured servants. Displaying aspects of the oral traditions of Yoruba culture in West Africa, these voices took on a subversive tone, a form of expression that Stover describes as the "mother tongue" and argues is completely different from literary forms employed by white men or women or black men. Stover maintains that the mother tongue--a system of linguistic and physical techniques--developed in response to black women's struggles to find outlets for expression in a white male dominated society. The African American mother tongue is not a result of biology but grew out of the need of black women to resist oppression. It is a combination of words, rhythms, sounds, and silences that black women encoded with veiled meanings. Moreover, it is a physical way of communicating--a look, a set of the lips, a positioning of the hand, hip, and head. It is a stance, an attitude of resistance, and a powerful force in social and political as well as literary life. She proposes that the linguistic practices are a balance of African, European, and African American communicative techniques and include secrets, silences, hesitations, whispers, feigned misunderstanding, lying, masking, mumbling, sass, invective, impudence, and dissembling. Stover focuses on four texts that employ the mother tongue and engage sociopolitical issues of the 19th century--Harriet Wilson's Our Nig, Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Elizabeth Keckley's Behind the Scenes, and Susie King Taylor's Reminiscences of My Life in Camp. Rhetoric and Resistancewill affect the way African American women's autobiography is read today and will be valuable to scholoars interested in linguistics and 19th-century literature and in African American, multicultural, and women's studies.

Black Skin White Masks

Author: Frantz Fanon
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 0802197604
Size: 30.58 MB
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Few modern voices have had as profound an impact on the black identity and critical race theory as Frantz Fanon, and Black Skin, White Masks represents some of his most important work. Fanon’s masterwork is now available in a new translation that updates its language for a new generation of readers. A major influence on civil rights, anti-colonial, and black consciousness movements around the world, Black Skin, White Masks is the unsurpassed study of the black psyche in a white world. Hailed for its scientific analysis and poetic grace when it was first published in 1952, the book remains a vital force today from one of the most important theorists of revolutionary struggle, colonialism, and racial difference in history.

Ella Baker And The Black Freedom Movement

Author: Barbara Ransby
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807827789
Size: 60.64 MB
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A stirring new portrait of one of the most important black leaders of the twentieth century introduces readers to the fiery woman who inspired generations of activists. (Social Science)

Demeaned But Empowered

Author: Obika Gray
Publisher: University of West Indies Press
ISBN: 9789766401535
Size: 60.54 MB
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Gray's central thesis asserts that the Jamaican state is a form of predatory state that incorporates contradictory social forces into an arrangement that is hierarchical, often brutal and ultimately debilitating to democracy. He introduces a series of constructs to support this argument, but the more interesting and novel theses are to be found in his vivid description of the social forces that resist the predatory state and how they have carved out a modicum of autonomy based on what he describes as an elaborate value system of badness/honour.

Angry Abolitionists And The Rhetoric Of Slavery

Author: Benjamin Lamb-Books
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319313460
Size: 27.36 MB
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This book is an original application of rhetoric and moral-emotions theory to the sociology of social movements. It promotes a new interdisciplinary vision of what social movements are, why they exist, and how they succeed in attaining momentum over time. Deepening the affective dimension of cultural sociology, this work draws upon the social psychology of human emotion and interpersonal communication. Specifically, the book revolves around the topic of anger as a unique moral emotion that can be made to play crucial motivational and generative functions in protest. The chapters develop a new theory of the emotional power of protest rhetoric, including how abolitionist performances of heterodoxic racial and gender status imaginaries contributed to the escalation of the ‘sectional conflict’ over American slavery.