A History Of Education For Citizenship

Author: Derek Heater
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134407297
Size: 42.91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2752
Download
In this unique examination of education for citizenship, Derek Heater covers two and a half millennia of history encompassing every continent. Education for citizenship is considered from its classical origins through to ideas of world citizenship and multiculturalism which are relevant today. The book reveals the constants of motives, policies, recommendations and practices in this field and the variables determined by political, social and economic circumstances, which in turn illustrate the reasons behind education for citizenship today. Sections covered include: * Classical origins * The age of rebellions and revolutions * Education for liberal democracy * Totalitarianism and transitions * Multiple citizenship education. A History of Education for Citizenship will be of interest to teachers and students of citizenship, particularly those concerned with citizenship education. It will also be of interest to those working in the field of politics of education and history of education.

Citizenship Education In The United States

Author: Iftikhar Ahmad
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1134846320
Size: 26.13 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 3114
Download
This book presents a history of the ideas and activities of the American Political Science Association (APSA) in the field of citizenship education in public schools. Examining APSA’s evolving objectives and strategies in implementing citizenship education, Ahmad analyzes the complicated relationship between the teaching of government in the public schools and the APSA’s changing visions of citizenship education. By offering a narrative of political scientists’ ideas on citizenship and citizenship education, Ahmad reveals the impact of APSA’s worldview and official policies concerning pre-collegiate curriculum and instruction in citizenship education. By providing a comprehensive history of ASPA’s agenda and its implementation, this book sheds light on the intersection between the pedagogical goals of political scientists and the meaning, purpose, and context for citizenship education in high schools.

Patriotism And Citizenship Education

Author: Bruce Haynes
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444322859
Size: 51.78 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 7185
Download
Seven authors describe the controversial nature of patriotism and citizenship education in their country, basing their account and recommendations upon their philosophical understanding of education and schooling. Offers differing national perspectives on patriotism across the United States, South Africa, New Zealand, Australia, Japan and England Discusses varying accounts of how patriotism and citizenship education should be handled as part of the school curriculum Provides crucial insights into how schools handle social and political demands on controversial topics

A Brief History Of Citizenship

Author: Derek Heater
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814736718
Size: 14.73 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2120
Download
“Patrolling the neighborhoods of central Fort Worth, sorting through trash piles, exploring dumpsters, scanning the streets and the gutters for items lost or discarded, I gathered the city's degraded bounty, then returned home to sort and catalogue the take.” —From the Introduction In December of 2001 Jeff Ferrell quit his job as tenured professor, moved back to his hometown of Fort Worth, Texas, and, with a place to live but no real income, began an eight-month odyssey of essentially living off of the street. Empire of Scrounge tells the story of this unusual journey into the often illicit worlds of scrounging, recycling, and second-hand living. Existing as a dumpster diver and trash picker, Ferrell adopted a way of life that was both field research and free-form survival. Riding around on his scrounged BMX bicycle, Ferrell investigated the million-dollar mansions, working-class neighborhoods, middle class suburbs, industrial and commercial strips, and the large downtown area, where he found countless discarded treasures, from unopened presents and new clothes to scrap metal and even food. Richly illustrated throughout, Empire of Scrounge is both a personal journey and a larger tale about the changing values of American society. Perhaps nowhere else do the fault lines of inequality get reflected so clearly than at the curbside trash can, where one person's garbage often becomes another's bounty. Throughout this engaging narrative, full of a colorful cast of characters, from the mansion living suburbanites to the junk haulers themselves, Ferrell makes a persuasive argument about the dangers of over-consumption. With landfills overflowing, today’s highly disposable culture produces more trash than ever before—and yet the urge to consume seems limitless. In the end, while picking through the city's trash was often dirty and unpleasant work, unearthing other people's discards proved to be unquestionably illuminating. After all, what we throw away says more about us than what we keep.

Citizenship

Author: Derek Heater
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 9780719068416
Size: 39.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 404
Download
Citizenship describes, analyzes and interprets the topic of citizenship in a global context as it has developed historically, in its variations as a political concept and status, and the ways in which citizens have been and are being educated for that status. The book provides a historical survey which ranges from the Ancient Greeks to the twentieth century, and reveals the legacies which each era passed on to later centuries. It explains the meaning of citizenship, what political citizenship entails and the nature of citizenship as a status, and also tackles the issue of whether there can be a generally accepted, holistic understanding of the idea. For this new edition an epilogue has been written which demonstrates the intense nature of the academic and pedagogical debates on the subject as well as the practical matters relating to the status since 1990.

Civics And Citizenship Education In Australia

Author: Andrew Peterson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1474248209
Size: 78.15 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5654
Download
Civics and Citizenship Education in Australia provides a comprehensive analysis of teaching and learning in this field in Australian schools, drawing on case study material to demonstrate the current practice in the field. Reflecting on the issues and possibilities raised by the inclusion of civics and citizenship education in the new national Australian curriculum, leading national and international scholars analyse the subject's theoretical, curricular and pedagogical bases and approaches. Placing civics and citizenship education within historical and contemporary contexts, the book critically explores a range of issues concerning the development, organisation and teaching of the subject. These include how the subject might include indigenous, global and Asian perspectives, and how it may help students to engage with issues around sustainability, active citizenship, diversity, religion and values. The final chapters written by scholars from England, the USA, Canada, Hong Kong and Singapore adopt a comparative approach situating Australian civics and citizenship education in the wider international context.

England S Citizenship Education Experiment

Author: Lee Jerome
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441104879
Size: 65.27 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 4758
Download
How do we prepare young people to understand the complex problems confronting our society and their place as citizens in shaping solutions? Until 1997, the contribution of schools to these challenges was ad hoc and uncoordinated, but with the introduction of citizenship education into the National Curriculum in England a new political project began. Between 2002 and 2012, England has become a leading player in the debate about how to induct young people into democracy. Jerome explores the connections between the values promoted by the government and the forms of citizenship promoted through the National Curriculum and considers: What did the politicians want the policy to achieve? What kinds of citizens were teachers trying to create? What kind of citizens do the young people feel that they have become? To answer these questions this book considers a range of evidence from large scale national and international research projects to single school case studies, conducted with student co-researchers. The study illustrates the complexity of policy making and reveals the gap between curriculum policy and implementation.

Debates In Citizenship Education

Author: James Arthur
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136618619
Size: 48.80 MB
Format: PDF
View: 317
Download
What are the key issues in Citizenship Education today? Debates in Citizenship Education encourages student and practising teachers to engage with and reflect on some of the key topics, concepts and debates that they will have to address throughout their career. It places the specialist field of Citizenship Education in a wider context and aims to enable teachers to reach their own informed judgements and argue their points of view with deeper theoretical knowledge and understanding. Taking account of recent policy and controversies, expert contributors provide a balance of experience and perspectives and cover a wide range of classic and contemporary topics including: Theoretical Perspectives on Citizenship Education; International Comparative Perspectives on Citizenship Education; Citizenship Education, Race and Community Cohesion; Climate Change and Sustainable Citizenship Education; ICT and Citizenship Education; Ethics and Citizenship Education; Assessment of Citizenship Education. Debates in Citizenship Education is for all student teachers, and practising teachers engaged in CPD or interested in furthering their understanding of teaching in the subject area. Including carefully annotated further reading and reflective questions to help shape your own research and writing, this collection provides an introduction to recent critical thinking and contemporary debates within Citizenship Education.

To The Past

Author: Ruth Wells Sandwell
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 080203814X
Size: 60.69 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 4102
Download
Recent years have witnessed a breakdown in consensus about what history should be taught within Canadian schools; there is now a heightened awareness of the political nature of deciding whose history is, or should be, included in social studies and history classrooms. Meanwhile, as educators are debating what history should be taught, developments in educational and cognitive research are expanding our understanding of how best to teach it. To the Past explores some of the political, cultural and educational issues surrounding what history education is, and why we should care about it, in the twenty-first century in Canada. Originally broadcast in the fall of 2002 on the CBC Radio program Ideas, the lectures that comprise this volume not only address how history is taught in Canadian classrooms, but also explore strands within larger discussions about the meaning and purposes of history more generally. Contributors show how Canadians are demonstrating a new interest in what scholars have termed 'historical consciousness' or collective memory, through participation in a wide range of cultural activities, from visiting museums to watching the History Channel. Canadian adults and children alike seem to be seeking answers to questions of identity, meaning, community and nation in their study of the past. Through this series of essays, readers will have the opportunity to explore some of the political and ethical issues involved in this emerging field of Canadian 'citizenship through history' as they learn about public memory and broadly defined history education in Canada.

The Quest For Citizenship

Author: Kim Cary Warren
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807899441
Size: 46.87 MB
Format: PDF
View: 3848
Download
In The Quest for Citizenship, Kim Cary Warren examines the formation of African American and Native American citizenship, belonging, and identity in the United States by comparing educational experiences in Kansas between 1880 and 1935. Warren focuses her study on Kansas, thought by many to be the quintessential free state, not only because it was home to sizable populations of Indian groups and former slaves, but also because of its unique history of conflict over freedom during the antebellum period. After the Civil War, white reformers opened segregated schools, ultimately reinforcing the very racial hierarchies that they claimed to challenge. To resist the effects of these reformers' actions, African Americans developed strategies that emphasized inclusion and integration, while autonomy and bicultural identities provided the focal point for Native Americans' understanding of what it meant to be an American. Warren argues that these approaches to defining American citizenship served as ideological precursors to the Indian rights and civil rights movements. This comparative history of two nonwhite races provides a revealing analysis of the intersection of education, social control, and resistance, and the formation and meaning of identity for minority groups in America.